Police Story (1985) - News Poster

(1985)

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The Problem With East Asian Action Cinema Today

Tom Jolliffe takes a look at recent trends in East Asian Action Cinema…

I’ve seen a lot of action films in my time. From all over the world. From the biggest blockbusters, to the straight to VHS specials that used to regularly populate your nearest video store. Whether it was the latest mega budget Schwarzenegger special, or Don ‘The Dragon’ Wilson starring in Bloodfist: VIII, I’ve put the hours in.

Like most Westerners my enthusiasm for the genre began with American films. Historically it has been America providing the majority of action films that register worldwide. I grew up on Die Hard, Predator, Lethal Weapon, Bloodsport and every low rent VHS premiere copycat you can imagine (Oh Don…). A little later I discovered Hong Kong and Chinese action films, particularly from that 80’s to early 90’s period of the former which saw ground breaking performers like Jackie Chan
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Rushes. New Fassbinder, "Stalin" Banned, De Havilland Sues

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.Recommended VIEWINGWe're very much in love with Zama, Lucrecia Martel's long-anticipated return to filmmaking. The new trailer calls us back to our encounter of the film at Toronto last year and our conversation with the director.We all know that Rainer Werner Fassbinder made a lot—a whole lot—of films in his all too brief 15 years of activity, but it's truly remarkable how new (old) work of his keeps appearing. First there was the revelation of World on a Wire (1973) and now another made-for-tv epic has been restored and is being re-released, Eight Hours Are Not a Day (1972-1973). We wonder what other future delights and provocations Rwf has in store for us!Recommended READINGDoll & EmAt The Guardian, Lili Loofbourow takes a look at how stories about women are perceived and received differently than those about men.
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Review: Heart of Glass—Jackie Chan's "Police Story"

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After a second failed attempt to break into the American market with The Protector (1985), a film in which he repeatedly conflicted with director James Glickenhaus, Jackie Chan returned to Hong Kong determined to top Hollywood. According to Chan, he told Glickenhaus: “You do The Protector and I’ll do Police Story, and I’ll show you what the action movie is all about.” Today, more than 30 years after its release, Police Story remains one of the best-loved and most impressive action films by the most popular action star in the world, and has been given the restoration treatment and Metrograph engagement befitting a true classic, while Glickenhaus is best known for actually writing and directing a movie called McBain.After knocking around Hong Kong for several years as a stuntman and bit player, and a few attempts at becoming a lead in cheap Bruce Lee knock-offs, Jackie Chan finally burst
See full article at MUBI »

15 Films to See in March

As March brings a close to 2017 in cinema with the Academy Awards, there are also a great number of noteworthy 2018 films making their way to theaters, ranging from animated adventures to dark comedies to ambitious blockbusters. Looking further back, in terms of restorations that are touring the country, don’t miss Chronicle of Anna Magdalena Bach, Mind Game, Police Story, and Eight Hours Don’t Make a Day.

Matinees to See: They Remain (3/2), Red Sparrow (3/2), Souvenir (3/2), The Leisure Seeker (3/9), Gringo (3/9), Ramen Heads (3/16), 12 Days (3/16), Keep the Change (3/16), 7 Days in Entebbe (3/16), Roxanne Roxanne (3/23), I Kill Giants (3/23), Game Over, Man! (3/23), Final Portrait (3/23), Salomé & Wilde Salomé (3/30), Outside In (3/30)

15. Ready Player One (Steven Spielberg; March 29)

Synopsis: When the creator of a virtual reality world called the Oasis dies, he releases a video in which he challenges all Oasis users to find his Easter Egg, which will give the finder his fortune. Wade Watts finds
See full article at The Film Stage »

Oscar-Nominated Film Editor Edward Abroms Dies at 82

Oscar-Nominated Film Editor Edward Abroms Dies at 82
Oscar-nominated and Emmy Award winning film editor Edward Abroms died on Feb. 13 of heart failure in Thousand Oaks, Ca. He was 82.

He received an Academy Award nomination in 1983 with Frank Moriss for “Blue Thunder.” Abroms won Emmys for “My Sweet Charlie” in 1970 and for “Columbo” in 1972.

His TV credits include “Ironside,” “Murder She Wrote,” “Kojak,” “Police Story,” “CHiPs,” “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “Hawaii Five-o.”

Abroms worked with director Steven Spielberg on the pilot for “Night Gallery” in 1969 and on Spielberg’s first feature film “The Sugarland Express.” He was also an editor on “Jewel of the Nile.”

Abroms broke into the entertainment industry with a job at the mailroom at Republic Studios, then went to work at Technicolor where he met his wife Colleen. He began working as an apprentice at Review Productions to assistant editor and dialog editor on the series “Tarzan.”

In 1969 he teamed up with director Lamont Johnson on the television movie “Deadlock
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Oscar-Nominated Film Editor Edward Abroms Dies at 82

Oscar-Nominated Film Editor Edward Abroms Dies at 82
Oscar-nominated and Emmy Award winning film editor Edward Abroms died on Feb. 13 of heart failure in Thousand Oaks, Ca. He was 82.

He received an Academy Award nomination in 1983 with Frank Moriss for “Blue Thunder.” Abroms won Emmys for “My Sweet Charlie” in 1970 and for “Columbo” in 1972.

His TV credits include “Ironside,” “Murder She Wrote,” “Kojak,” “Police Story,” “CHiPs,” “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “Hawaii Five-o.”

Abroms worked with director Steven Spielberg on the pilot for “Night Gallery” in 1969 and on Spielberg’s first feature film “The Sugarland Express.” He was also an editor on “Jewel of the Nile.”

Abroms broke into the entertainment industry with a job at the mailroom at Republic Studios, then went to work at Technicolor where he met his wife Colleen. He began working as an apprentice at Review Productions to assistant editor and dialog editor on the series “Tarzan.”

In 1969 he teamed up with director Lamont Johnson on the television movie “Deadlock
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Trailer for upcoming Chinese film ‘Keep Calm and Be a Superstar’

Hong Kong star Eason Chan (Office, Dream Home) is delivering kung fu slapstick with ‘Keep Calm and Be a Superstar’, a fun-filled comedy from director Vincent Kok (Gorgeous). The film has obvious references to Jackie Chan’s Drunken Master and Police Story and centers around a cop who goes undercover on an action movie to try and stop a drug trafficking ring. Alongside Easton Chan the cast includes Eason Chan, Li Ronghao, Li Yitong, and Danny Chan Kwok-Kwan.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Trailer for upcoming Chinese film ‘Keep Calm and Be a Superstar’

Hong Kong star Eason Chan (Office, Dream Home) is delivering kung fu slapstick with ‘Keep Calm and Be a Superstar’, a fun-filled comedy from director Vincent Kok (Gorgeous). The film has obvious references to Jackie Chan’s Drunken Master and Police Story and centers around a cop who goes undercover on an action movie to try and stop a drug trafficking ring. Alongside Easton Chan the cast includes Eason Chan, Li Ronghao, Li Yitong, and Danny Chan Kwok-Kwan.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

10 awesome martial arts fights in the snow

Craig Lines Dec 6, 2017

Christmas and martial arts movies? They rarely crossover. But amazing fights in the snow? Now we're in business...

I love martial arts movies and I love Christmas so I'm kinda sad that the two have never really come together (Kung Fu Panda Holiday doesn't count). I'd hoped to find at least one good example to write about, as we move into the festive period, but I guess since most martial arts films come from Buddhist countries and Christmas is a Christian holiday, I was destined for disappointment.

I did briefly consider making one up with the aid of Photoshop, but wasn't sure I could get away with it so, alas, The 25th Advent Chamber Of Shaolin is not to be. For what it's worth, I'd got as far as an apprentice monk named Ho, fighting his way through 25 'doors' of a giant temple designed to resemble an advent calendar.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Willie Chan, Jackie Chan’s Former Manager, Dies at 76

Willie Chan, Jackie Chan’s Former Manager, Dies at 76
Willie Chan, film producer and long-time manager of Jackie Chan, has died. He was 76.

Sources tell Variety that he died in his sleep, between Tuesday night and Wednesday morning, local time.

Born in Malaysia as Chan Chi-keung, and educated partly in Hawaii, Chan moved to Hong Kong in 1970. That was just as Bruce Lee mania was at its peak, and was propelling the Hong Kong film industry, which is made up of many exiles from Greater China, into a production boom.

Chan quickly met Jackie Chan through actor Charlie Chin. Jackie Chan was working as a stunt man. With Hong Kong looking for a new male action hero following Lee’s untimely death, Willie Chan found Jackie Chan his first starring role in Lo Wei’s 1976 film “New Fist of Fury.”

Their 38-year relationship weathered the ups and downs of Jackie Chan’s early career, including self-imposed exile in Australia, and an unsuccessful
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'The Foreigner' Review: Jackie Chan Goes the 'Taken' Route in Revenge Thriller

'The Foreigner' Review: Jackie Chan Goes the 'Taken' Route in Revenge Thriller
Legend is a much abused word in the movie business – but Jackie Chan really is a legend. The undisputed king of martial-arts movies kicked up a notch with slapstick and jaw-dropping stunts, the star is acrobatic poetry in motion. American audiences know him best from his three Rush Hour action comedies with Chris Tucker (No. 4 is on the drawing board), but true aficionados rightly point to Chan's death-defying Hong Kong cinema epics – see Drunken Master, Police Story and Armor of God – as pinnacles of the form. The lifetime achievement Oscar
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Top 5 Films Without Repeating a Language or Country

by Sebastian Nebel

Name your Top 5 films without repeating a language or country of origin.

That was the challenge I posed on Twitter last month. It's tricky enough to limit your favorites to a specific number, and I was interested in seeing what kind of responses this added degree of difficulty would garner.

Turns out Twitter loves making lists! I got a ton of replies – way too many to collect all of them here, unfortunately. But I've rounded up a handful of them after the jump including lists by The Film Experience contributors, film critics and film makers...

edgarwright

@edgarwright

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (Il buono, il brutto, il cattivo)

2001: A Space Odyssey

Police Story (警察故事)

Delicatessen

Santa Sangre (Holy Blood)

— August 28, 2017
See full article at FilmExperience »

Ridiculous Movie Stunts: The Landmark Moments

Author: Rob Keeling

With Fast and the Furious 8 due out in cinemas this week, it seems only right that we look back at some of the landmark moments in the proud history of ridiculous stunts. The Fast and the Furious movie franchise is one which has firmly embraced the “more is more” approach to set pieces and stunts and while in its infancy it made do with garish cars racing quickly, it now parachutes them out of planes and drives them from building to building.

Since the early days of cinema though, filmmakers have been going to great lengths to make their action sequences really impress:

Safety Last! (1923) – The clock face

In this aptly titled silent comedy, star Harold Lloyd was playing an employee climbing the outside of his work’s building as part of a publicity stunt. How did they make this feat look so realistic with 1920s technology?
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Vital Life Lessons You Can Learn From Action Movies

Whosoever said that only teachers, lecturers and professors can teach us the real meaning of life, didn’t know about the existence of action movies. Wondering why we say so? Well, skills like hanging from a helicopter, holding to our composure even the enemy tries to demean you and taking violent adventures and escapades head on are a few skills only action movies can teach us. From the likes of Stallone, Lundgren, James Bond to Seagal and Schwarzenegger, these pantheon of great action stars can teach us many great things about life. They are:

You do not need to resort to violence to blow your enemy away: Taking cue from the body of work of the lovably dangerous Jackie Chan, resorting to Ak-47s to blow your enemy away isn’t how life works. Just a little bit of martial arts mixed with some heart-stopping stunts and the weakness of
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Cine-Sunday: ‘Shaolin’ Review

Stars: Andy Lau, Nicolas Tse, Jackie Chan, Wu Jing, Fan Bingbing, Yu Hai, Xiong Xinxin | Written by Alan Yuen | Action Director Corey Yuen | Directed by Benny Chan

Review by Baron Fortnightly

China’s last imperial Dynasty has fallen and a ruthless warlord (Andy Lau) amasses a vast fortune through the violent subjugation of his people. Faced with a brutal betrayal, he runs for his life, seeking redemption in the fabled Shaolin Temple. When his enemies discover his location, he must stand with his new brothers and fight his lifes greatest battle…

Shaolin, also known as The New Shaolin Temple, is a 2011 film directed by Benny Chan (New Police Story, Gen X Cops) and an updated version of the 1982 classic and Jet Li’s film debut, The Shaolin Temple. I’ve seen a lot of films recently that whilst watchable have been lacking that certain something that makes them really enjoyable
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Hong Kong goes West - When Hong Kong film makers attempt to break the Western market - part 1

Throughout the 1980’s and early 1990’s, Hong Kong cinema produced many films that to this day are considered to be the best action films ever made. Films like Police Story (1985), The Killer (1989), Once Upon a Time in China (1991), Hard Boiled (1992) and Full Contact (1992) are still impressing new audiences to this day and it is no surprise that Hollywood producers began to take notice of the popularity of such films. It was only a matter of time before film makers like John Woo, Tsui Hark and Ringo Lam would be brought to Hollywood and attempt to incorporate their skills into a Hollywood production. Unfortunately a number of these films never lived up to the directors Hong Kong work, with Hollywood studios...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

When Jackie Chan was reunited with his stunt team

Simon Brew Feb 16, 2017

If you're not seen it yet, this video of Jackie Chan being reunited with the Jackie Chan Stunt Team is really something...

We’re a little late to this one, and many of you will already have seen it. But this video is quite something.

See related Taboo episode 6 review Taboo episode 5 review Taboo episode 4 review Taboo episode 3 review

Jackie Chan, in the 1970s, came together with a bunch of actors and stunt performers, and formed The Jackie Chan Stunt Team. They worked on some of Chan’s most famous and beloved movies, such as Police Story, and Chan made sure that they were looked after as his fame grew.

Chan recently appeared on a Chinese TV show called The Negotiator, and it’s a segment about his team that you’re about to see in the following video. Assuming you click on the video, natch. We
See full article at Den of Geek »

Four Rising Stars of Chinese Cinema

Four Rising Stars of Chinese Cinema
Jing Tian (pictured)

The 28-year-old actress is the rising star of China. A graduate of Beijing Dance Academy and Beijing Film Academy, she has appeared in big productions such as costume epic “The Warring States” (2011), and acted alongside Donnie Yen in “Special ID” (2013) and Jackie Chan in “Police Story 2013” (2013). She has signed on three films with Legendary Pictures, including a prominent role in Zhang Yimou’s “The Great Wall” (2016) and joined the cast of “Kong: Skull Island” (2017) and “Pacific Rim: Uprising” (2018).

Liu Jian

Born in 1969, Liu Jian was trained as a painter at Nanjing University of the Arts, but he embarked on a career in animation in 2001 with a three-minute short featured in Feng Xiaogang’s comedy “Big Shot’s Funeral.” He made his debut with animated feature with “Piercing I.” The film was dubbed China’s first independent animated feature and won critical acclaim. His second animated feature, “Have
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jackie Chan’s Kung Fu Yoga – Review

Jackie Chan and Stanley-Tong’s Sixth Film Together

Kung Fu Yoga marks the sixth film that Jackie Chan has made together with director Stanley Tong ( Police Story 3, Rumble in the Bronx, Police Story 4, The Myth and Chinese Zodiac (writing credits) ) .

Kung Fu Yoga is a multi-lingual Chinese-Hindi action adventure comedy, co-produced by Taihe Entertainment (India) and Shinework Pictures (China). It’s the first Indian-Chinese co-produced film with the hope that it sets the trend for future projects together for these two countries.

The film also stars Indian actors Sonu Sood, Disha Patani and Amyra Dastur, as well as Aarif Rahmen aka Aarif Lee ( Bruce Lee, My Brother and L.O.R.D).

Hong Kong star Eric Tsang (Infernal Affairs) also makes a relatively brief but equality important appearance. (Eric Tsang also featured in Jackie Chan’s SkipTrace, Accidental Spy, the Lucky Stars series, and the infamous Armour of God…
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Cine-Sunday: ‘Invisible Target’ Review

Stars: Nicholas Tse, Jaycee Chan, Shawn Yue, Wu Jing | Written by Benny Chan, Melody Lui, Rams Ling | Directed by Benny Chan

The paths of a renegade cop (Tse), a rookie police officer (Chan) and a veteran detective (Yue) converge with explosive results, as they each take on their most deadly assignment to date: the arrest of Hong Kong’s most lethal mercenary gang and their ruthless leader, played by Kung Fu impresario Wu Jing. The city becomes a battleground, as both sides break all the rules to defy each other in the ultimate fight for survival, justice and revenge!

Director Benny Chan has made some of the best action-packed police dramas in modern Eastern cinema – Man Wanted, Big Bullet, Gen-x Cops, and the superb New Police Story. With Invisible Target he re-teams with Nicholas Tse for what may be his most gloriously over-the-top, action-filled extravangza ever! And like New Police Story,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »
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