Edit
The Breakfast Club (1985) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Director Cameo (1)  | Director Trademark (1)  | Spoilers (12)
The scene in which all characters sit in a circle on the floor in the library and tell stories about why they were in detention was not scripted. Writer and director John Hughes told them all to ad-lib.
Judd Nelson (John Bender) stayed in character off-camera, even bullying Molly Ringwald. John Hughes nearly fired him over this, but Paul Gleason (Richard Vernon) defended Nelson, saying that he was a good actor, and he was trying to get into character.
John Hughes later said that his biggest regret about this film was using the breaking glass effect during the marijuana scene.
586 of 590 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Judd Nelson improvised the part at the closing of the film where Bender raises his fist in defiance. He was supposed to just walk into the sunset, so to speak, and John Hughes asked him to play around with a few actions. When he was done and they were finishing up, Nelson threw his fist up without running it by anyone. Everyone loved it, and it has also become an iconic symbol of the 1980s as well as cinema history.
933 of 942 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In 2010, Molly Ringwald (Claire Standish) and Anthony Michael Hall (Brian Johnson) told Vanity Fair magazine that John Hughes was receptive to actors' and actresses' improvisations, and some of them (including Brian's reason for having a fake ID, "so I can vote") made it into the final film.
681 of 688 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Judd Nelson (John Bender) made up many of the terms used in the movie, including "Neo-Maxi Zoon dweebie."
484 of 488 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The film was shot in sequence.
916 of 927 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
It was originally suggested that there would be several sequels to this movie, occurring every ten years, in which "The Breakfast Club" would get back together. This did not come to pass, due to the volatile relationship between John Hughes and Judd Nelson (John Bender). Hughes stated that he would never work with Nelson again. Also, it was unclear whether or not Hughes still held ill will against his oft-cast starlet, Molly Ringwald (Claire Standish). They had a falling out in the late eighties, after Ringwald decided to move on from the teen film genre to pursue more adult roles, thus severing her relationship with Hughes.
715 of 723 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes wrote the screenplay to this movie in just two days (July 4 and 5, 1982).
698 of 706 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Bender's flinch when Vernon fakes a punch was genuine. Judd Nelson really thought Paul Gleason was going to hit him.
469 of 474 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Judd Nelson (John Bender) went undercover at a local high school outside Chicago near where the film was shooting, and convinced the teenagers that he was a legitimate student. After buying beer for them with his "fake ID" (he was twenty-four at the time), Nelson told them to drop him off at the hotel where the actors were staying. Years later, reflecting on his antics, Nelson said, "They would ask me why I was staying there, and I told them my dad was in jail. I'm staying at the Westin O'Hare while my dad's incarcerated."
578 of 586 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Anthony Michael Hall (Brian Johnson)'s mother, Mercedes Hall, and his younger sister, Mary Christian, played his character's mother and sister in the movie.
482 of 489 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Judd Nelson's clothes in the movie are the outfit he auditioned in for the role of John Bender.
395 of 401 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Cusack auditioned several times for John Bender, even travelling between Chicago and Los Angeles before being cast. However, John Hughes went in a different direction, and dropped Cusack in favor of Judd Nelson, which was heavily influenced by the casting director.
260 of 263 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Originally, only Claire was supposed to dance, but Molly Ringwald felt uncomfortable dancing alone, so John Hughes had the entire cast dance. Ringwald has said she regrets this because not only did she think her dancing was bad, her inability to do the dance solo led to the artifice of the MTV type choreographed dancing, which she feels hurt the movie.
343 of 348 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The David Bowie quote at the beginning of the movie is pulled from his song "Changes". It can be found on his 1971 album, "Hunky Dory". Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds) suggested the quote to John Hughes, who liked it, and thus included it in the opening.
440 of 449 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Anthony Michael Hall (Brian Johnson) hit a growth spurt during production. According to Judd Nelson (John Bender), Hall was shorter than him at the start of production, but at the end of it, he was taller than him.
334 of 340 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The ages of everyone in the principle cast at the time of filming are: Judd Nelson (25 years old), Molly Ringwald (16 years old; her 17th birthday was only three days after the film's release), Emilio Estevez (23 years old), Anthony Michael Hall (16 years old) and Ally Sheedy (23 years old).
592 of 606 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Kapelos jokingly warned the young actors to not overdo their intensity, laughingly noting that Martin Sheen once suffered a serious heart attack while filming Apocalypse Now (1979). Emilio Estevez (Andrew Clark) was enraged by the remark, and Kapelos was then stunned to learn that Martin was Estevez's father. While Estevez accepted Kapelos' apology and filming was unaffected, Kapelos said years later he still felt terrible about what he said, even though he hadn't had any idea about the connection between Sheen and Estevez, and had offended Estevez completely inadvertently. When Kapelos guest-starred on The West Wing (1999), he told Martin Sheen this story. Sheen thought it was very funny, which provided Kapelos a small amount of relief from the chagrin he had felt about the incident since it happened.
742 of 761 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes originally wrote Andy (Emilio Estevez) as a football player, but decided teen movies already had too many of those.
140 of 141 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The dandruff that Allison (Ally Sheedy) shakes onto her penciled drawing for snow, was achieved by sprinkling Parmesan cheese. Actress Ally Sheedy did not actually use her real dandruff, as she is often accused of doing. She did however really eat the sandwich filled with Pixie Stick dust and unrefined sugar, just as it looks like in the movie.
455 of 465 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The joke that Bender tells (while crawling through the ceiling), but never finishes, actually has no punchline. According to Judd Nelson, he ad-libbed the line. Originally, he was supposed to tell a joke that would end when he came back into the library and said, "Forgot my pencil", but no one could come up with a punchline for the joke.
440 of 450 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes said that before filming began, the cast rehearsed the entire movie a few times as if it were a play. After the film became a hit, Hughes was asked to write the script as a play, so high schoolers could perform it.
440 of 450 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Emilio Estevez was originally going to play Bender. However, John Hughes could not find someone to play Andrew, so Estevez agreed to play him.
304 of 310 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The theme song, "Don't You (Forget About Me)", was written for the film by Keith Forsey. It was a number one hit for Simple Minds, and Billy Idol and Bryan Ferry turned down offers to record it first (although in 2001, Billy Idol recorded Don't You (Forget About Me) as a bonus track for his Greatest Hits album). The song was also turned down by Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders, who then suggested they offer it to the band fronted by her husband at the time, Simple Minds.
397 of 406 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
It was Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds)'s idea to put Cap'n'Crunch cereal in the sandwich to give it an extra crunch sound.
157 of 159 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The switchblade used in the movie actually belonged to Judd Nelson (John Bender). He explained that he had it for protection purposes.
367 of 376 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Judd Nelson (Bender) went to a laundromat in character. The looks he was giving to women there have caused a paranoid bystander to dial 911 on Nelson to have him reported to the police.
149 of 151 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Allison [Ally Sheedy] does not speak until 25 minutes into the movie, uttering a mocking "Hah!" in response to Claire, who ironically orders her to shut up.
473 of 487 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
According to Molly Ringwald, Claire was originally scripted as having pasta salad for lunch. Ally Sheedy (Allison) suggested to John Hughes that Claire eat sushi for lunch, which was generally considered a luxury food in America during the mid-1980s.
112 of 113 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The library in which this movie takes place was constructed in the gymnasium of Maine North High School specifically for the film. The school closed down in 1982, two years before filming began. The building had been used for park district purposes and the Chicago Blitz of the now-defunct USFL (United States Football League), before the Illinois State Police bought it and turned it into a police station, which it is to this day.
306 of 314 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ally Sheedy had first auditioned for the part of Samantha Baker in Sixteen Candles (1984), which went to Molly Ringwald. When Sheedy auditioned, she had two black eyes from a set building accident. The black eyes gave her a dark, gothic image, which stayed with John Hughes. When it was time to cast the part of Allison, Hughes remembered, and called Sheedy.
225 of 230 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Vernon is based on a wrestling coach from John Hughes' high school, who flunked him in gym. Hughes ran into him later, and the coach said the movie was good, but the teacher was a real jerk.
219 of 224 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The BMW driven by Claire (Molly Ringwald)'s father (Tim Gamble) belonged to John Hughes.
136 of 138 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Molly Ringwald, Anthony Michael Hall and John Kapelos were all in Sixteen Candles (1984) the year before. Later that year Hall and Kapelos appeared in Weird Science (1985) together. Hughes was planning for Hall and Ringwald and him to team up again in both Pretty in Pink (1986) and Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986), and have the three of them keep making movies like that, almost like Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland made all those Andy Hardy teen pictures back in the 40s, one after the other, playing different characters and in different movies and with the same actors. But Ringwald and Hall had other plans. While Molly did appear in Pretty in Pink (1986), Hall said no to the Duckie role. He said this was due to a "redundancy issue"; that it was too much like the love triangle where they squared off in Sixteen Candles (1984). Reportedly John Hughes was hurt and never got over the grudge. He refocused on Ringwald, hoping she would star in Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) and Some Kind of Wonderful (1987), which again were teens caught in a love triangle type movies, but at this point, after appearing on the cover of Time, Molly wanted to spread her wings and try other projects. Ringwald's and Hall's rejection of Hughes at this point hurt him deeply, and in fact led to end of his whole John Hughes teen movie genre. Without his muses to inspire him, Hughes lost interest in the genre, and stopped making those movies; and in effect the genre he had invented died at that point. In an op-ed piece Molly wrote after Hughes died many years later, she compared this to Michael and Wendy Darling leaving Neverland, and Peter Pan shutting down Neverland out of spite forever as a result. She said Hughes held a grudge against them for rejecting him, and effectively stopped making teen movies all together. He also never really spoke to either one of them again either up until the time he died and never collaborated in any other films, leaving for dead the "John Hughes teen movie" genre.
71 of 71 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
When high on marijuana, Brian (Anthony Michael Hall) says, "Chicks cannot hold their smoke, that's what it is", which is from a Richard Pryor stand up routine.
187 of 191 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Nicolas Cage was originally considered for the role of John Bender, but the production could not afford his salary at the time. John Cusack was originally cast as John Bender, but John Hughes decided to replace him with Judd Nelson before shooting began.
261 of 268 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes originally wanted "The Breakfast Club" to be a two and a half hour movie. However, many of the scenes were cut out and the negatives destroyed. John Hughes said in Première that he had the only complete copy of The Breakfast Club on film. Among the cut scenes from the movie (some filmed, some only written) are:

-Carl predicts where the five kids will be in thirty years: Bender will have killed himself; Claire will have had "two boob jobs and a face lift"; Brian will have become very successful but die of a heart attack due to the stress of the high paying job; Allison will be a great poet, but no one will care; and Andrew will marry a gorgeous airline stewardess who will become fat after having kids.

-In a dream sequence Allison imagines Andrew as a gluttonous Viking, Bender as a prisoner, Claire as a bride, Brian as an astronaut and herself as a vampire. In an unfilmed alternative to this dream sequence all the five kids imagine random things including cars, naked women, Godzilla, beer and fighter planes, and these things end up filling the room until Vernon interrupts.

-John Bender was not going to walk to school in the original script. He was going to be driven by his dad in a rusty tow truck, and have a brief fight with him before his dad drives off. Bender was also tossed a bagged lunch, with his father saying "You are a waste of lunch meat!"

-After Bender demonstrates "Life at Big Bri's house" Brian stops Bender, and corrects him with a much more pessimistic version of the skit. Claire then proceeds to act out her life before asking Bender to demonstrate his version. Bender's routine changes as well here. After Bender mimics his mom, he stops, commenting that "then they make me work to pay off the dentist for the teeth he busts."

-The scene where Andrew and Allison are walking to get the sodas is extended to a point, where Allison pulls out a pack of cigarettes, and smokes one.

-After getting the sodas, Bender shakes his can violently and places it among the five to see who gets the rigged one. Allison ends up getting it, and when she opens the can, all the soda squirts directly into her mouth.

-After Vernon asks who has to use the lavatory, the five go to the bathroom. Vernon gives the boys two minutes, and the girls three minutes. Claire catches Allison in a stall eating a bag of chips, repulsing her. Bender mocks Brian for sitting down to pee instead of using a urinal.

-When the group is sitting in the circle and Allison mentions that she can write (and do other things) with her toes, she was going to follow up with an actual demonstration.

-Several staff members were cut out of the script before filming: Dr. Lange (Social Studies teacher who dresses oddly), and Robin (gym teacher). Robin helps Vernon on a few workout machines until Vernon injures his back, and she eventually visits the students while they are in their circle in the library. Robin initially replaced many of Carl's scenes, and Carl was originally set to be a minor character with only two scenes.

-During a cast reunion in honor of the film's 25th anniversary, Ally Sheedy revealed that a Director's Cut existed, but Hughes' widow did not disclose any details concerning its whereabouts.
548 of 568 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In reality, Molly Ringwald (Claire Standish) could not do the lipstick trick. They had to use different camera angles to make it appear that she could.
207 of 212 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Claire (Molly Ringwald)'s entire ensemble was purchased specially for the character from a Ralph Lauren store, the only one in Chicago at the time. John Hughes had rejected the original costume, on the grounds that it wasn't sophisticated enough.
254 of 261 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Emilio Estevez (Andrew Clark), Judd Nelson (John Bender), and Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds) played high school students in this film, the same year that they would portray college graduates in St. Elmo's Fire (1985). John Hughes recommended all three for their roles.
315 of 325 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds) nicknamed Anthony Michael Hall (Brian Johnson) "Milk and Cookies", because she thought he was sweet. Hall never liked the nickname.
199 of 204 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Coke cans from which the characters drink have the symbol from the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles.
262 of 270 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The marijuana the actors smoke in the film was actually oregano.
326 of 337 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Molly Ringwald was originally asked to play Allison, even though she wanted to play Claire. She eventually convinced John Hughes and the studio, and was given the part. Although there's some dissension on this. Other cast and crew members have said Molly was originally cast as Claire but tried to pressure the studio and Hughes to let her play the punk goth chick Allison, but Hughes put his foot down and said no, she was wrong for the part, she had to stick to Claire. Molly disagrees with this, and says she'd had her sights set on Claire the whole time, since Claire was so unlike her, so unlike anything she'd played before, and she had a handle on Claire basing her on her sister. (Which is interesting because Molly's sister in Sixteen Candles (1984) was also a snotty bitch). Molly said Hughes had pushed her to do Allison, but the Psycho eccentric outsider chick was too much like the role she'd played in Sixteen Candles (1984), Tempest (1982), Surviving (1985) and other movies, and that she wanted to try something new, and eventually Hughes relented and let her play Claire.
303 of 313 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Judd Nelson improvised the part when Bender hawks a loogie and catches it.
114 of 116 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ranked at #1 for Entertaiment Weekly's 50 Best High School Movies (2006).
286 of 296 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes told Ally Sheedy to go to bed and wake up the next day as Allison. Sheedy said she thought, "I don't have to wake up as Allison. I am Allison."
121 of 124 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
As an end-of-filming present, John Hughes gave each actor and actress a piece of the "library's" banister.
188 of 195 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
As most people know, Shermer, Illinois is a fictitious suburb of Chicago in several John Hughes films such as this film, as well as Weird Science (1985), Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986), Sixteen Candles (1984), Pretty in Pink (1986), and National Lampoon's National Lampoon's Vacation (1983). But, the zip code that Brian states in the opening of the film, 60062, is to an actual town. It belongs to Northbrook, Illinois, a town about thirty miles north of Chicago. Northbrook was originally incorporated as "Shermerville" (it changed its name in 1923), and one of the main roads through the town is still named Shermer Road. Glenbrook North High School, on which the film is based, is located on Shermer Road. John Hughes graduated from Glenbrook High School, and based his movies on the school and students. "The Breakfast Club" was the nickname for Saturday detentions. Hughes used other street names from his childhood as well. In "Sixteen Candles" Randi's boyfriend is named Johnny Montrose; who is named after a famous Chicago street.
203 of 211 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In a recent article in AV Club Judd Nelson said that most of the close up shots he did with Molly Ringwald were with her double, since Molly was only 16 at the time; a minor, and had to be in school during much of the shooting schedule, and they couldn't work her after hours either due to the strict labor laws with minors.
48 of 48 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The cast all agreed later that Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds) was the best dancer.
127 of 131 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes said getting the film greenlit by Universal wasn't easy because the executives complained there were no bare breasts, no party scene, no guys drinking beer, or other things they thought a teenage picture needed at that time.
46 of 46 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
If John Hughes couldn't get Emilio Estevez to play the role of Andrew Clark, he would have considered casting Michael J. Fox, Jim Carrey, Tom Cruise, Matthew Broderick, or Rob Lowe.
88 of 90 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
During filming, John Kapelos (Carl) rarely associated with the other cast members to keep a feeling of isolation.
103 of 106 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
At the beginning of the movie, there are some shots of the school building right before the kids show up for detention. Written on a wall is, "I don't like Mondays". This refers to a school shooting in 1979, committed by sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer. Brenda's father gave her a rifle for Christmas in 1978. On January 29, 1979, she used her new rifle to shoot ten children and staff at Clevelend Elementary School in San Diego, California. The school was across the street from her house, where she was during the incident. She killed the school's Principal, and one of the custodians, and injured eight children. After six hours, she was apprehended by Police. When asked why she did it, she said "I don't like Mondays. This livens up the day." As for selecting her targets, she said "I like red and blue jackets." As of April, 2009, she is serving a life sentence, and has been denied parole four times. At her 2005 parole hearing, she claimed that her father had sexually abused her as a child, and that she was drunk, and on PCP at the time of the shooting. According to her, the authorities, and her attorney, conspired to hide the drug test results. As for remorse, she said at the time, "I had no reason for it, and it was just a lot of fun", "It was just like shooting ducks in a pond", and "(The children) looked like a herd of cows standing around. It was really easy pickings." The incident, and Spencer's lack of remorse also inspired The Boomtown Rats' hit "I Don't Like Mondays".
396 of 421 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The film's title comes from the nickname invented by students and staff, for detention, at New Trier High School, the school attended by the son of one of John Hughes' friends. Thus, those who were sent to detention were designated members of "The Breakfast Club". "The Breakfast Club" at that school probably took its name in turn from the title of American radio's longest running network entertainment show, broadcast from Chicago, 1933 to 1968.
184 of 193 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes attended Glenbrook North High School, one of the schools where the movie was filmed.
137 of 143 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Molly Ringwald (Claire Standish) and Anthony Michael Hall (Brian Johnson) dated for a while after filming this movie.
377 of 402 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The cast and crew often played basketball in the gym between set-ups.
90 of 93 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
When Andrew Clark's (Emilio Estevez's) father, (Ron Dean), tells him, "No school's going to give a scholarship to a discipline case", he originally followed up with, "Not a white one, anyway."
158 of 166 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Rick Moranis was originally cast as the janitor. He grew a thick beard, and decided to play the character with a Russian accent. John Hughes planned to let Moranis reinterpret the character, but producer Ned Tanen so vehemently opposed Moranis' comical creative liberties that he had Rick replaced with John Kapelos.
171 of 180 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Molly Ringwald has declared in interviews that "When you grow up, your heart dies", said by Allison Reynolds (Ally Sheedy) in this movie, is her favorite line.
56 of 57 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes insisted that the entire cast and crew eat their meals on-location in the Maine North High School cafeteria.
149 of 157 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes was so impressed by Molly Ringwald (Claire Standish)'s performance that he had her mother come in and watch the dailies.
97 of 101 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Additional cut content includes an extended version of the pot smoking scene, in which Brian (Anthony Michael Hall) and Claire (Molly Ringwald) are seen singing "All My Lovin'" by The Beatles, and a new scene in which Allison (Ally Sheedy) breaks into the teachers' lockers using a switchblade, where she finds a copy of the Prince album "1999", remarking, "You know what this means? They're human." Several other differences between the definitive, and uncut versions of the film, have been noted, chiefly an extended make out scene, in which not only Bender (Judd Nelson) and Claire are seen kissing, but also Andy (Emilio Estevez) and Allison. Lastly, during John Hughes' small cameo as Brian's dad in the final scene (a performance which he later criticized), he was originally given the short line "buckle up".
138 of 146 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes wanted the detention area to take place in a library, but the school's library was too small, so they built the library set in the school's gym.
89 of 93 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
It was Judd Nelson's idea for Bender to be wearing a tennis shoe in the gymnasium scene. They are Air Jordans.
101 of 106 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Other proposed titles were "The Lunch Bunch" and "Library Revolution".
123 of 130 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The album that Allison (Ally Sheedy) is looking at during lunch is Prince's "1999", published on October 27, 1982.
156 of 166 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Chicago Public Library donated over ten thousand books to be used in the movie.
87 of 91 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
When Bender (Judd Nelson) is distracting Vernon (Paul Gleason) while the others make their way back to the library, part of the song he sings is a few lines from "Turning Japanese" by The Vapors. The other part he sings while running down the hallway are lines from a U.S. Military cadence: "I wanna be an Airborne Ranger".
143 of 152 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Jim Carrey auditioned for the role of John Bender.
109 of 115 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes and Judd Nelson (John Bender) disagreed about whether or not the cigar burn was real.
71 of 74 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Stanley Kubrick watched The Breakfast Club (1985) four times and was really impressed by Anthony Michael Hall's performance. He compared Hall to a young Spencer Tracy. Kubrick wanted to cast him in the lead role of Pvt. Joker in his upcoming film Full Metal Jacket (1987), but after months of negotiations Hall turned down the offer. The part went to Matthew Modine.
43 of 44 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Jodie Foster was considered to play Claire, and Brooke Shields was considered to play Allison.
139 of 149 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Allison Reynolds (Ally Sheedy) never speaks to Richard Vernon (Paul Gleason) despite his authority in the film. The closest she ever comes to communicating with Vernon is squeaking and chuckling at him. Vernon: And I will NOT be made a fool of. Allison: laughs. Vernon: (to Allison) And you can make book on that, Missie!
86 of 91 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds) generally ate very healthful food. She got a sugar high from the sandwich she eats on-screen.
82 of 87 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
While eating lunch, Andrew (Emilio Estevez) takes his lunch out of a "Happy Foods" paper grocery bag. Happy Foods is an actual grocery store in the north and northwest suburbs of Chicago. He also has a bag of Matt's Cookies; one of the first brands of prepackaged soft cookies, introduced in the early 1980s.
119 of 128 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Karen Leigh Hopkins was cast as Robin, a gym teacher who gives the teens advice. But after one day of filming, Hopkins was fired and her scenes were re-written for Carl (John Kapelos), the janitor. According to the book "John Hughes: A Life in Film", Molly Ringwald (Claire Standish) and Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds) objected to a scene in which Robin was seen nude in the locker room, so John Hughes deleted her character.
90 of 96 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes wrote The Breakfast Club (1985) before he wrote Sixteen Candles (1984), but the studio was concerned that Hughes's first film was a drama, completely filmed in-house and featuring just talking; basically a Broadway Encounter group type formula. They wanted him to do something tried and true; something along the lines of National Lampoon's Animal House (1978), so he wrote Sixteen Candles. But, ironically, Sixteen Candles was not the commercial and critical hit Breakfast Club was. It did ok; but Breakfast Club, not a formula movie like Sixteen Candles, was a much bigger hit at the box office.
49 of 51 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes set most of the movie in one room, because he thought it would be easier to film.
48 of 50 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The title of the film is actually the last spoken line.
119 of 129 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Molly Ringwald (Claire Standish) and Anthony Michael Hall (Brian Johnson) were the first actress and actor to be cast.
66 of 70 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ally Sheedy said during a 2020 interview that her son never wanted to watch any of her films, but when he was 13 he had to watch The Breakfast Club because it was part of his young Beck Lansbury's film class curriculum. She said that afterwards he told her it was a good movie, that he liked her character, and that he thought she did a good job. She also joked that it gave her a little tiny modicum of coolness with him.
24 of 24 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
A prom queen election poster contains the name of Michelle Manning, who co-produced the film.
83 of 89 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The guidance counselor's desk has a name plaque which says "R. Hashimoto". Richard Hashimoto was the production supervisor.
74 of 79 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ally Sheedy based some of Allison's quirks on Sean Penn, with whom she had just worked on Bad Boys (1983).
65 of 69 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Judd Nelson and Emilio Estevez would try to go to local schools and "blend in" (which was hard because they were both 23, harder still because Estevez was famous because of movies like The Outsiders (1983) and Repo Man (1984) already made him famous). Nelson had better luck than Estevez, and actually became part of a clique of local young men from one of the Chicago area high schools, and he admits he would use his "fake ID" (which was his real Id) to get them beer and even buy them pot a couple times when they wanted it.
35 of 36 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes let the cast look at early drafts of the script to pick out parts that they liked.
45 of 47 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In both The Breakfast Club (1985) and Sixteen Candles (1984) the Anthony Michael Hall character confesses he is a virgin. The same is true of Molly Ringwald characters in those films. Though the two were 'frenemies' in both movies, they briefly dated during the production of Breakfast Club.
34 of 35 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Robin Wright auditioned for the role of Claire.
93 of 101 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Simple Minds were initially reluctant to record "Don't You (Forget About Me)", believing that it was just a throwaway song for a forgettable movie. They recorded the song within three hours and then forgot about it, as they continued to work on their next album. After the movie came out, the band discovered that the song has reached #1 in the US charts.
33 of 34 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
During this period, early and mid 80s, when John Hughes was at the height of his powers, Hughes, Anthony Michael Hall and Molly Ringwald were essentially in a clique together (strange as that was since Hall and Ringwald were teenagers and Hughes was in his 30s). Feeling like he'd missed out on the group bonding activities that usually make up people's childhood, Hughes wanted to be a teenager again, and maybe was reliving this through Hall and Ringwald. And Hall and Ringwald genuinely liked him, he was like their crazy, funny older brother, who also happened to be a Hollywood power player who had vaunted them both to the top of the A-List. So for a year or two, 1984-1985, during the filming of Sixteen Candles (1984), The Breakfast Club (1985), Pretty in Pink (1986) and Weird Science (1985), the three of them would hang out, go to restaurants and clubs and concerts and were friends. All of this ended after The Breakfast Club (1985), when Hall rejected Hughes for the Duckie role in Pretty in Pink (1986), and then Ringwald rejected Hughes' pitch for them to be in Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) and Some Kind of Wonderful (1987), (which were originally going to star Ringwald and Hall just like The Breakfast Club (1985) and Sixteen Candles (1984). In fact, this might have very well gone on forever if Hall and Ringwald hadn't put a stop to it. And at that point the terrible trio broke up, and in fact they rarely if ever spoke to Hughes much again after that. Hughes stopped making teen movies and started making kids movies, Uncle Buck (1989), and the incredibly successful Home Alone (1990), which at that point was the most successful comedy ever made. But many felt the magic was gone, that without his teen muses Hall and Ringwald, and without the comfort of the genre he created, Hughes' spirit and creativity sort of died, and the movies he made after were never quite the same. Both Hall and Ringwald, as well as others, have spoken extensively about this in interviews.
50 of 53 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Judd Nelson (John Bender) was the last to be cast.
66 of 71 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Simple Minds was so unimpressed with the prospects for the soundtrack entry "Don't You (Forget About Me)" that the lead singer recorded the "La la la la" out-bridge chorus as gibberish to fill out the track after the initial recording session. He planned to replace it with proper lyrics the next day, but the rest of the band loved it and convinced him to keep the "la la la la" in place. It ended up being an iconic part of the song.
21 of 21 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Brian (Anthony Michael Hall)'s social security number, as filched by Allison (Ally Sheedy), indicates that he was born in Connecticut.
81 of 88 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
To condition his boots, Judd Nelson (John Bender) poured a quart of motor oil on them, and left them for a day.
56 of 60 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Molly Ringwald has said in interviews that this movie is about "the universal feeling we all have especially in high school: that we are all outsiders, we all feel alone, and yet we all want to be accepted."
30 of 31 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
While Maine North High School was no longer a fully-functioning high school at the time of filming, the school was in use as the Alternative Resource Center (A.R.C.) for High Schools Maine West (also in Des Plaines), Maine South, and Maine East (both of Park Ridge, Illinois). Students that were a chronic disciplinary problem, considered to be unruly or disruptive to the learning process of others, would find themselves at Maine North every day, as an alternative to expulsion, or other disciplinary measures. Maine Township still conducts the A.R.C., now in Morton Grove, Illinois, with a goal of providing a structured environment with positive reinforcement for appropriate behavior.
67 of 73 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes wanted the music to be heavy on drums and bass, to mirror the emotions of the characters. Keith Forsey was chosen to be the composer because he was a drummer.
37 of 39 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
While chastising Bender (Judd Nelson) in the supply closet, Vernon (Paul Gleason) says that he makes $31,000 a year. Adjusted for inflation, that comes to $81,739 in 2022.
73 of 80 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds) was cast partly because of her role in WarGames (1983).
44 of 47 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In 2016, The Breakfast Club (1985) was selected for the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant".
18 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The High School was used in John Hughes' next film, Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986), with Matthew Broderick playing the title character, and was considered for the role of Andrew Clark.
62 of 68 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Allison (Ally Sheedy), Brian (Anthony Michael Hall) and Carl (John Kapelos) are the only ones to make John (Judd Nelson) laugh.
68 of 75 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The large sculpture in the library, which Allison (Ally Sheedy) adorns with lunch meat, and Bender (Judd Nelson) rides like a mechanical bronco, bears an astounding resemblance to a bronze work by famed British artist Henry Moore titled "Standing Figure, Knife Edge" (or, in a larger version, "Large Standing Figure, Knife Edge"). These are editioned works (and there's one in Arkansas), so John Hughes either borrowed it for the movie, or used it as the model for a set piece.
74 of 82 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Paul Gleason played Vernon again in the parody Not Another Teen Movie (2001). Molly Ringwald had a cameo, and Anthony Michael Hall was mentioned.
92 of 103 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The song which Judd Nelson (Bender) hums the guitar riff to at the beginning of the movie is the opening of "Sunshine of Your Love" by Cream. Cream's song "Badge" also features in Fandango (1985). Nelson also starred in this movie.
115 of 130 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
79 of 88 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Bill Murray was briefly considered for the role of Carl. Murray's younger brother Brian Doyle-Murray appears as a priest in Sixteen Candles (1984) which was also directed by John Hughes.
17 of 17 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Paul Gleason was cast as Vice Principal Vernon because John Hughes liked him in Trading Places (1983).
47 of 51 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In 2018, Molly Ringwald (Claire Standish) wrote a piece in The New Yorker in which she described watching the film with her 10-year-old daughter. Although she was bothered by scenes of sexual abuse and harassment in this film and other films and material by John Hughes, she stood by the work, recognizing that these issues were a product of the times and that Hughes' films were still beneficial in helping teens assert their independence and identity.
70 of 78 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Many people feel that the original prototype for this movie was Whose Afraid of Virginia Wolfe, with its Broadway Encounter Group Formula, which had people holed up together in a room and arguing, shouting, divulging personal secrets and revelations and confronting each other to move the drama. William Friedkin's movie The Boys in the Band (1970) about the New York gay scene post Stonewall had a similar format; A Chorus Line, Michael Bennett's smash 1975 musical about the gritty lives of Broadway dancers, also followed this formula pattern, and Lawrence Kasdan's classic The Big Chill (1983) also followed a similar formula, and was another obvious influence on the The Breakfast Club (1985). In fact, most critics called this the "Little Chill" or the "Big Chill" for teenagers. The Breakfast Club (1985) had a huge influence itself. Movies like Richard Linklater's Before Sunrise (1995) series, which features Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy arguing and improvising on their feelings of life for young people, were directly influenced by The Breakfast Club (1985). Another movies influenced by it is Peter's Friends (1992) (a group of classmates and friends reunited after ten years to spend together New Year's Eve).
16 of 16 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
After Andrew finishes pulling out his lunch from the paper bag then turns around to Bender, audience can see for a second Judd Nelson breaking character when he smiles at Emilio Estevez.
16 of 16 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
when the Janitor, Carl, enters the library he greets Brian exclusively by name and asks how he's doing. This is played off as a joke because of course the nerd would be friends with the janitor. Later, in a cut scene, it's revealed Carl was the one who found the flare gun in Brian's locker.
16 of 16 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Despite Vernon wanting a one thousand word essay from everyone, the final essay ended up being a total of 96 words.
16 of 16 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Breakfast Club (1985) and Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) were both inducted into the National Registry for being Culturally significant; Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) in 2014 and The Breakfast Club (1985) in 2016. Those were the only two John Hughes movies that accomplished this.
23 of 24 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ally Sheedy said in 2020 that she disliked her character Allison's end-of-film makeover where Molly Ringwald's Claire transformed Allison's appearance, covering her in blush and eye-shadow and giving her a pink dress and headband to wear. Sheedy didn't like the message it relayed: that she had to change herself to get a boy to notice her. Sheedy said she and Ringwald petitioned John Hughes to change it to promote a less negative message. She didn't want Claire to put make-up on Allison's face, and had hoped that her physical transformation would involve merely slipping off her enormous black sweater and wearing with pride the plain white shirt she had on underneath. But he didn't go for that. It was the eighties and they wanted an ugly duckling becomes a swan transition.
23 of 24 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The film takes place on Saturday March 24, 1984. The date is for real.
83 of 95 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The line "You couldn't ignore me if you tried" is also the title of a book about the teen movies of the 1980s. It was written by Susannah Gora and published on February 9, 2010. In it, Gora talks about Brat Pack created in the decade of skinny ties and where outcasts and prom queens fall in love, preppies and burn-outs become buds, frosted lip gloss and optimism to feel invincible, in addition to cultural themes and its meaning, and how it has influenced an entire generation who still believe that life always turns out the way it is supposed to. It includes interviews to Molly Ringwald, Anthony Michael Hall, Ally Sheedy, Judd Nelson, Andrew McCarthy and John Cusack, besides material from the movies to the music to the way the films were made to show how they helped to shape the vision for romance, friendship, society, and success in the 80s ahead.
48 of 54 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Originally, this film was to have three girls and three boys.
46 of 52 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In early drafts of the script, Claire (Molly Ringwald) was called Cathy.
43 of 49 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
To break up a highly claustrophobic talkathon, John Hughes had originally written a sequence in which the school's synchronized-swimming team came by to practice with its extremely sexy P.E. teacher. The youngsters would sneak out of the library and find a peephole into the women's locker room. There, they would spy the well-endowed P.E. teacher topless. Karen Leigh Hopkins was even cast in the role. But during rehearsals in Chicago, his two young actresses, Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy, joined swiftly by co-producer Michelle Manning, ganged up on him saying they strongly objected to the gratuitous female nudity in the screenplay. They felt it was really sexist and misogynistic (even though Ringwald's character did the same thing by staring at a naked female classmate in the school showers in Hughes' previous film Sixteen Candles (1984)). That night Hughes revised the script where a janitor replaced the P.E. teacher. Thankfully, the male janitor wasn't naked either. Hopkins was let go since her role was no longer needed. But Hopkins, who later became a screenwriter, stated in a 2015 interview that she didn't know anything about a nude scene and she definitely never filmed one. She said she was cast as a gym teacher who gives the five kids a speech about life after high school. That scene was never filmed though because she was suddenly let go with no warning or explanation. She didn't hear about the topless scene story until many years later.
23 of 25 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Film critic Gene Siskel called this a teen-aged Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966).
11 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Alison (Ally Sheedy) says that she can play "Heart and Soul" on the piano with her feet. This is the song that Tom Hanks and Robert Loggia played, using their feet, on the giant piano in the toy store in Big (1988). They also played chopsticks on the piano.
102 of 125 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
What they ate for lunch: Andrew (Emilio Estevez): a bag of chips, chocolate cookies, three sandwiches, milk, a banana, and an apple. Claire (Molly Ringwald): sushi (rice, raw fish, and seaweed). Allison (Ally Sheedy): a sandwich with Pixie Stix and Cap'n Crunch cereal. John (Judd Nelson): nothing. Brian (Anthony Michael Hall): soup, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich (with the crusts cut off), and apple juice.

Back when this movie was filmed, sushi was just beginning to become popular in the US and was not remotely as ubiquitous as it is now. Hence Claire's explanation and Bender's snarky reaction.
129 of 161 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Contrary to popular belief, the final scene on the football field was not filmed at Glenbrook North High School in Northbrook, Illinois. The entire film was shot at the abandoned Maine North High School in Des Plaines. The football field was on the east side of the building, and has since been converted to condominiums.
19 of 21 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Breakfast Club (1985) is the only movie in John Hughes' famed High School Trilogy that was rated R. This is completely for language, and an implied off-screen sexual moment (some would say a harassment or assault moment) between Bender and Claire. Amazingly, this movie got an R rating when Sixteen Candles (1984), which also features full on nudity, an implied rape or harassment scene between Haviland Morris and Anthony Michael Hall, Molly Ringwald dropping the F bomb, and also sorts of other salty language, and adult situations, got a PG rating. Also amazingly, this is back from a time when filmmakers weren't so hyper about having every movie they make, even movies aimed at teenagers, getting a PG rating. This movie got an R; was a box office smash, and still beat out Sixteen Candles (1984), which was PG, at the box office. These days if the movie was made Hughes would be bending over backwards to get a PG rating, as almost all filmmakers have to do these days.
34 of 40 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Laura Dern tried out for both female parts in The Breakfast Club and was rejected. Later she referred to John Hughes movies as "that teen junk". Dern bounced back and got two great parts that year: the lead in Joyce Chopra's Smooth Talk (1985) and the female lead in David Lynch's Blue Velvet (1986). Similarly, John Cusack, who had been cast the previous year as Bryce, Anthony Michael Hall/Farmer Ted's crony in Sixteen Candles (1984), was in the running for Bender, and made it to the final callbacks for the part, when Nelson finally edged him out. He was bitter about the rejection also but went on to star in many other teen classics of the 1980s.
14 of 15 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Anthony Michael Hall (Brian) and Ron Dean (Andrew's father) appeared in The Dark Knight (2008).
62 of 79 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Hughes is seen picking up Anthony Michael Hall from the school at the end of the movie.
8 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The license plate on Brian (Anthony Michael Hall)'s mother (Mercedes Hall)'s car is EMC 2. The license plate on Andrew (Emilio Estevez)'s father (Ron Dean)'s car is OHIOST.
88 of 116 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In a 2018 article for the New Yorker, Molly Ringwald said she and her mother tried to get John Hughes to not film the scene where Bender peeks at Claire's panties as she's sitting at her desk in a short skirt, but Hughes refused. Ringwald said he hired an adult woman as a stand in for the shot because she was a minor at that point and she didn't think it was legal to film a minor's panty-covered crotch. But she said that even having another person pretend to be her was embarrassing and upsetting to her mother, even though they both knew about the scene when Ringwald accepted the role.
12 of 13 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Anthony Michael Hall (Brian Johnson) and John Kapelos (Carl Reed) appeared in Sixteen Candles (1984) and Weird Science (1985).
24 of 29 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Molly Ringwald talked about her famous lipstick trick during a 2012 interview with Entertainment Weekly: "There is a story behind that: John Hughes wrote it but never actually thought about me having to do it. He kept putting it off until the end of filming that long scene. I kept bringing it up, like, 'Hey. We gotta figure this out. Are we going to have robotic breasts?' Finally we decided it was better to see less and let everyone assume that I was particularly skilled."
11 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Judd Nelson (John Bender), Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds), John Kapelos, Molly Ringwald (Claire Standish) and Anthony Michael Hall (Brian Johnson) have all appeared in at least one episode of the USA show Psych (2006). Although Emelio Estevez does not appear in the show, Shawn called himself Emilio Estevez Esteevez a couple of times.
31 of 39 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Molly Ringwald (Claire Standish) and Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds) played sisters in Betsy's Wedding (1990).
31 of 40 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In a 2010 interview, Ally Sheedy was asked if she still believed that Allison's line, "When you grow up, your heart dies", was true. She replied, "I believed it then, I don't believe it so much now. I think maybe it dies a little bit in different ways".
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This town is set in Shermer, Illinois, a fictional town in the North Shore of Chicago. There is no Shermer Illinois; but there is a Shermer Road in Northbrook, Illinois; which is where John Hughes grew up. Hughes took the name of this prominent road and used it for his town name.
8 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This film is part of the Criterion Collection, spine #905.
10 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Amazingly, ten years after this came out, in 1995, Molly Ringwald was offered another teenage girl part. She was offered the role of Sidney Prescott, the main star in Scream (1996) eventually played by Neve Campbell. Screenwriter Kevin Williamson offered it to her first before Campbell and Drew Barrymore because he was such a fan of Sixteen Candles (1984) and The Breakfast Club (1985). Although Ringwald was flattered she turned him down, saying "I don't want to be a 28 year old still playing high school girls in movies". Ironically most of the "kids" in the movie were about Molly's age: Campbell was 24, Rose McGowan was 24, Skeet Ulrich was 26, Matthew Lillard was 26, Jamie Kennedy was 25 and Barrymore was 25.
10 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Of all the five teens, Brian (Anthony Michael Hall) is the only one whose middle name is revealed (Ralph, as in "puke").
33 of 48 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The main reason that John Hughes decided to replace John Cusack (as Bender) with Judd Nelson is that Hughes felt that Cusack was "too nice" to play a character as menacing and angry as John Bender. One bitter irony for Hughes is that he got along very well with Cusack in the pre-production process, while his on-set relationship with Nelson was so bad that Hughes swore he would never work with Nelson again (and in fact never did so).
7 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
With only seven characters in the film or eleven if you count the parents and Brian's younger sister, this film has one of the most least number of characters in movie history.
7 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Sean Penn could have played the Bender role. John Cusack was also up for the role but John Hughes didn't think he had the necessary toughness; Cusack tends to come across as a sweetheart in all his roles.
9 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
As with The Graduate (1967), WarGames (1983) and other teen- and youth-oriented movies of its ilk, most of the adults in this movie are made out to be monsters or symbols of authoritarianism and how teens are mistreated in society. The parents and Principal Vernon are all mostly abusive to the youths in the movie; they are there to show how youths are mistreated in society and provide the impetus for the plot. Similarly in The Graduate, all of the characters who are over 21 are referred to as "Mr. Robinson" or "Mrs. Robinson"; we never learn their first names because they are supposed to be ciphers and symbols for authoritarianism, exemplifying how Ben and Elaine are chewed up by society (unless they rebel). In WarGames, David Lightman's parents and the administrators in Washington are mostly painted as boobs - the idiots that let the crisis develop in the first place.
14 of 19 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Molly Ringwald said in 2018 that she finds the crowd-pleasing romance between her character and Bender, played by Judd Nelson, difficult to root for now. She said "Bender sexually harasses Claire throughout the film. When he's not sexualizing her, he takes out his rage on her with vicious contempt, calling her 'pathetic,' mocking her as 'Queenie.' It's rejection that inspires his vitriol. Claire acts dismissively toward him, and, in a pivotal scene near the end, she predicts that at school on Monday morning, even though the group has bonded, things will return, socially, to the status quo. He never apologizes for any of it, but, nevertheless, he gets the girl in the end."
13 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Anthony Michael Hall (Brian Johnson) is taller than Judd Nelson (John Bender) and Emilio Estevez (Andrew Clark). This is made apparent in the scene where they are marching along the library railing when all the dancing starts.
27 of 43 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Brian's (Anthony Michael Hall) personality completely changes once he smokes pot. He starts talking like Chubby Checker and making raunchy jokes. It's also in this scene that the clean cut character is revealed to have a pornographic picture in his wallet. Hall would revisit the "ebonics" drawl in Weird Science (1985), released the same year, while his character is drunk.
15 of 22 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Candy was considered for Carl. Candy went on to work with John Hughes in Planes, Trains & Automobiles (1987), Uncle Buck (1989) and Home Alone (1990).
13 of 19 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Most of the kids are brought to detention in cars that illustrate their social status or backgrounds. They are a 1983 BMW 633 CSi (Claire); a 1984 Dodge Aries K (Brian); a 1984 Ford Bronco II (Andrew); and a 1984 Cadillac Seville (Allison). Bender, who comes from a trashy, abusive home, walks to school alone.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Due to this film being set in the same school as Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) and taking place in 1984 this film quite possibly takes place a year before the events of the latter film. And it is likely Richard Vernon is deputy to Ed Rooney and the teenagers are very familiar with Ferris himself despite the fact Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) was not made until after this film.
8 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
During the scene when Andrew and Allison are talking about unsatisfied home lifestyle, you can see a missing drawer from the card catalogs. This was due to Bender removing it in a previous scene to rearrange the cards.
9 of 13 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Bender spends most of the movie harassing Claire. There's even a scene of implied assault or harassment, where Bender bites or touches Claire off-screen and she kicks him. Bender is rewarded for all this bullying by having Claire kiss Bender, give him her earring, and essentially starting a relationship with him. Molly Ringwald herself has spoken out about this since the onset of the #Me Too Movement, and how disturbed by all of this she is, particularly about the mixed messages this sends to her daughter and the next generation; particularly since The Breakfast Club (1985) turned basically in a right of passage movie for all teenagers of the later generations.
27 of 48 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Most of the cast is playing against type in this movie. Although he plays a clean cut jock in this movie, Emilio Estevez usually plays a seedy punk in the movies, more like the Judd Nelson/John Bender character. In Repo Man (1984), Wisdom (1986), The Outsiders (1983) and That Was Then... This Is Now (1985) he plays a troubled punk/outlaw character; ala John Bender. And Judd Nelson, as a matter of fact, usually plays a clean cut character in the movies, not a punk: In St. Elmo's Fire (1985), From the Hip (1987), Blue City (1986) and the TV series Suddenly Susan (1996) he plays preppy, clean cut characters; more like Andrew Clark, than the shady criminal he plays in this movie. Molly Ringwald is also definitely playing against type here. She usually plays distressed outsider girl roles, not the rich Heathers-type snob of Claire Standish. But then Anthony Michael Hall, who plays a geek in Weird Science (1985), this and Sixteen Candles (1984), is definitely playing to type; as is Ally Sheedy, who plays an eccentric weird girl in this, WarGames (1983) and High Art (1998) as well. Paul Gleason who plays an abusive authoritarian character in Trading Places (1983), is also playing to type.
12 of 20 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
There is a top ten hit songs associated with all of John Hughes' teen movies. In Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) the song is "Oh Yeah" by Yello (known commonly as "bow bow chicka chicka" by the phonetic in its lyrics); in Sixteen Candles (1984) the homonym "Sixteen Candles" by The Stray Cats; in The Breakfast Club (1985) "Don't You (Forget About Me)" by Simple Minds; in Weird Science (1985) the too homonym "Weird Science" by Oingo Boingo, and Pretty in Pink (1986) the by third time homonym "Pretty in Pink" by The Psychedelic Furs. Music is a huge part of all of Hughes' movies, and The Breakfast Club (1985) is no exception; although except for the Karla DeVito's "We Are Not Alone", with MTV dance montage; and the ongoing riffs on the theme song; this movie has the least musical montages of any of Hughes' movies. Sixteen Candles (1984), Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) and Pretty in Pink (1986) sample many more randomly selected songs in it's soundtrack than The Breakfast Club (1985) does. It's all part of the carefully controlled atmosphere Hughes is trying to establish in this very serious encounter group therapy movie.
11 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
As both a sly little aside by the director, and as a cautionary reminder of the unpredictable futures of high school students, funky janitor Carl's class portrait appears in the opening montage, revealing that he was himself "Man of the Year" at Shermer only five years earlier.
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The pen that Brian Johnson (Anthony Michael Hall) uses in the film is a Lamy Safari Model L217.
50 of 107 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Bender calls Mr. Vernon "Dick". Then he corrects himself: "Excuse me; Rich?". Bender is full well aware of the pun he is making here. This is about the time in American history - the early 80s - that "Dick" fell out of favor as a nickname for men named Richard.
5 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The famous lipstick trick was taught to Molly Ringwald by director John Hughes, who demonstrated the technique himself to the cast and crew.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
During the slipping-on-the-floor shot in the sneaking-through-the-halls scene, only Claire and Bender are wearing soles that could actually slide at all on a linoleum floor. Everyone else is wearing rubber soles which would have to have been fixed by the prop department to enable them to slide freely.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Talking about "Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon", nearly every cast member has been in at least one other movie together: Anthony Michael Hall was in Weird Science (1985) with John Kapelos. Molly Ringwald was in Betsy's Wedding (1990) with Ally Sheedy. Judd Nelson and Ally Sheedy were in Blue City (1986) together. And Molly Ringwald, Anthony Michael Hall and John Kapelos were in Sixteen Candles (1984) together. And also Judd Nelson, Ally Sheedy and Emilio Estevez were all in St. Elmo's Fire (1985) together. In addition to this Molly Ringwald was in Not Another Teen Movie (2001) with Paul Gleason; spoofing the roles they play in this movie. Emilio Estevez and Paul Gleason appeared in National Lampoon's Loaded Weapon 1 (1993). And Anthony Michael Hall worked with his on-screen dad John Hughes in National Lampoon's Vacation (1983) before this, and then afterwards in the aforementioned Weird Science (1985); and Ally Sheedy worked with John Hughes again after this in Only the Lonely (1991). Four of the five students in The Breakfast Club (1985), everyone except Emilio Estevez, would also appear on the TV series Psych (2006). And John Kapelos and and Paul Gleason would both make cameo appearances on the TV series Seinfeld (1989). If this wasn't enough Ally Sheedy and Paul Gleason both had recurring roles on the TV series Hill Street Blues (1981) as well. Also Emilio Estevez (Andrew Clark)'s father, Martin Sheen, appeared in the film The Dead Zone (1983); and Anthony Michael Hall (Brian Johnson) later played the lead role on the TV series The Dead Zone (2002), while Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds) and John Kapelos (Carl) made guest appearances. Anthony Michael Hall (Brian) and Ron Dean (Andrew's father) also appeared in The Dark Knight (2008) together. In addition to all this Anthony Michael Hall, Molly Ringwald, Judd Nelson and Ally Sheedy also all appeared in the 2010 Academy Awards Tribute to John Hughes.
10 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Anthony Michael Hall's character is named Brian Johnson, which happens to be the name of AC/DC's singer (1980 to 2016).
23 of 50 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Everyone's lunch gets ridiculed except for Bender (he doesn't have one).
11 of 21 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Molly Ringwald appeared in Sixteen Candles (1984) with her sister Beth Ringwald; who played school dance girl, Patty in that movie. Similarly Anthony Michael Hall appears with his sister and mother in this movie; Mary Christian and Mercedes, who, respectively play his mean sister and mother who are chastising him in the car before he goes to detention.
7 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The only film of John Hughes where Anthony Michael Hall's character doesn't get romantic involved with anyone. He only does in Sixteen Candles (1984) and Weird Science (1985).
7 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Bender (Judd Nelson) refers to Claire (Molly Ringwald) as a "richie". In Pretty in Pink (1986), Andie (Molly Ringwald) refers to Blaine (Andrew McCarthy) as the same thing.
8 of 15 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ironically, "We Are Not Alone", which is the song the detentionees dance to halfway through the movie, in the movie's obligatory music video scene (this being 1985), is written by another famous Hollywood teen actor, Robby Benson. Benson won several awards for the song. Benson, much like the kids in the movie, was a teen idol about ten years before this; starring in movies like Ode to Billy Joe (1976), The Chosen (1981) and Ice Castles (1978).
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Almost called The Lunch Bunch.
4 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Judd Nelson would harass Molly Ringwald off-set as part of his method acting. He would make fun of her blind musician father, touch on other hot button issues, and tease, harass and bully her, much like his onscreen persona. In the Susannah Gora's book on the John Hughes/80s/teen phenomenon movies "You Couldn't Ignore Me If You Tried" (which is taken from a line from this movie), Ringwald said she "so knew what (Nelson) was doing," and was not phased by his method actor attacks. Although Hughes was not so tolerant and understanding; he almost fired Nelson because of his antics. He also said he would "never work with Judd Nelson again" because he was basically acting like his psychopath punk character on the set the whole time. It is interesting that in the pre-#MeToo era when the movie was filmed, in Chicago in 1984, both Molly Ringwald (and the other actors on this set) and her onscreen alter ego witnessed and experienced harassment, but tended to dismiss it and look the other way.
19 of 44 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Paul Gleason (Richard Vernon) and John Kapelos (Carl) later appeared on the popular NBC sitcom Seinfeld (1989), in separate episodes during the 1993-94 television season. Kapelos played the titular character in Seinfeld: The Sniffing Accountant (1993) and Gleason appeared in Seinfeld: The Opposite (1994).
24 of 58 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Emilio Estevez (Andrew Clark) and Paul Gleason (Richard Vernon) appeared in National Lampoon's Loaded Weapon 1 (1993).
15 of 34 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Brian (Anthony Michael Hall)'s reference and stereotype is as "The Brain". The name "Brian" and the word "brain" are anagrams of each other.
32 of 84 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Principal Richard "Dick" Vernon (Paul Gleason) is named after Richard Vernon.
16 of 40 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Breakfast Club (1985) was one of two films released in that year that starred Judd Nelson, and he also worked with a director who also wrote the screenplay. Here it was John Hughes, for Fandango (1985) it was Kevin Reynolds. Incidentally Thomas Del Ruth was the cinematographer on both films.
6 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Paul Gleason who played Principal Richard Vernon in this film would later play another school villain which would be Professor McDoogle in National Lampoon Van Wilder which was released 17 years later
2 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Breakfast Club has been called the quintessential 1980s film.
2 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Included among the American Film Institute's 2004 list of 400 movies nominated for the top 100 America's Greatest Music in the Movies for the song "Don't You (Forget About Me)."
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Breakfast Club poster "family shot", notably including Bender's raised fist, was satirized in the poster for the comedy-horror film, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
New York Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez famously recreated the dance sequence with one of her friends.
9 of 26 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The podcast Quantum Recast (2020) took The Breakfast Club out of 1985 and recast it in the year 1998 with relevant actors from that year, in Quantum Recast: The Breakfast Club- 1998 (2020)
3 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Vernon says to Bender, "Don't mess with the bull, or you'll get the horn". In real-life Paul Gleason was born on May 4th, making his zodiac a Taurus (it means, bull).
15 of 53 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Ally Sheedy characters nickname could be Ally. However, Ally Sheedy's real life full name is Alexandra.
8 of 28 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Emilio Estevez (Andrew Clark)'s father, Martin Sheen, appeared in the film The Dead Zone (1983). Anthony Michael Hall (Brian Johnson) later played the lead role on the TV series The Dead Zone (2002), while Ally Sheedy (Allison Reynolds) and John Kapelos (Carl) made guest appearances.
7 of 24 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Paul Gleason (Vernon) and Judd Nelson (Bender) both appeared in hostage situation films. Gleason appeared in "Die Hard" (1988) and Nelson appeared in "Airheads" (1994). Both films were distributed by 20th Century Fox and filmed at the Fox Plaza Complex in Century City, Los Angeles, California.
3 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
As subtle indicators of character, the costume designers paid close attention to each character's personality and backgrounds. Vernon is dressed in a bland, oatmeal-colored polyester suit. Coming from a lower-class background Bender wears multiple layers of ill-fitting clothes to stay warm, in direct contrast to Claire who wears a stylish leather flight jacket and boots. Brian wears a sweatshirt, khaki slacks, and sneakers directly out of J.C. Penny, and the highly conflicted Allison has an expensive fur parka, but dresses in drab, bag-lady apparel underneath.
2 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Rob Lowe auditioned unsuccessfully for the part of John Bender that went to Judd Nelson.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Paul Gleason later starred in No Code of Conduct (1998) which also starred Emilio Estevez's brother Charlie Sheen and their father Martin Sheen.
2 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
It eventually becomes obvious that Allison's character is highly intelligent: she's eccentric, observant, artistic, and memorizes Brian's social security number just by looking at it.
2 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The students share some characteristics with the gang from Scooby Doo, Where Are You! (1969). For example Andrew is similar in appearance to Fred Jones and like Fred is muscular and a jock. Claire like Daphne Blake has red hair. Brian like Shaggy Rogers can be cowardly and both wear green tops and similar to Velma Dinkley is the brainiest of the outfit. Allison like Shaggy appears to be a big eater even though both are skinny. (This might be because both shows are playing out teen movie stereotypes).
2 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

Director Cameo 

John Hughes: Brian's father, who picks him up at the end of the film.
215 of 227 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

Director Trademark 

John Hughes: [The Beatles] Principal Richard Vernon (Paul Gleason) is named after a minor actor from A Hard Day's Night (1964). When the principal asks the janitor what he wanted to be when he grew up, the janitor replies that he wanted to be John Lennon.
132 of 140 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

In the beginning of the movie, different shots of the school hallways and classrooms are shown, and you can see what the flare gun did to Brian (Anthony Michael Hall)'s locker. Also, there is a picture of a former Shermer High School student "Man of the Year". The guy in the picture is the janitor, Carl Reed (John Kapelos).
355 of 359 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The following are the reasons each character is in detention on Saturday:

-Claire Standish (Molly Ringwald): ditched class to go shopping.

-Andrew Clark (Emilio Estevez): he taped a guy's butt cheeks together in the locker room.

-Brian Johnson (Anthony Michael Hall): the flare gun he took to commit suicide went off in his locker, burning it.

-John Bender (Judd Nelson): pulled a false fire alarm.

-Allison Reynolds (Ally Sheedy): didn't do anything, she didn't have anything better to do on a Saturday. However, this claim is most likely untrue after Allison's compulsive lying.
498 of 514 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Bender (Judd Nelson) continuously provokes Principal Vernon (Paul Gleason) into giving him extra Saturday detentions. It is later implied that Bender does this intentionally, because he'd rather be with Vernon at school on a Saturday than home with his abusive father. It's also implied (during the scene where Vernon escorts him to the closet and rips into him) that he acts the way he does because he'd rather have people think he's a tough troublemaker than a troubled abuse victim. Overall, it shows that he has more tolerance (and possibly more respect) to deal with Vernon than his parents.
247 of 253 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The theatrical trailer shows brief footage that was ultimately never used. One shot shows Allison (Ally Sheedy) sitting by herself in a small room (presumably while the rest of the kids are getting high). Another brief clip shows Allison (post makeover) exclaiming to Andrew (Emilio Estevez) that she doesn't wanna be alone anymore, to which he responds that she doesn't have to be.
99 of 101 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
When aired on television, there are often one of two (very rarely both) additional scenes shown to fill the time and content gap: Right after Mr. Vernon (Paul Gleason) excuses Andrew (Emilio Estevez) and Allison (Ally Sheedy) to go to the teacher's lounge to use the soda machine, there is additional footage of Allison walking past Andrew, and going straight towards the door while he collects change from Brian (Anthony Michael Hall). The whole time, Vernon is telling them to get a move on. Bender (Judd Nelson) then holds his hand out towards Brian, who thinks he wants a high five and proceeds to give him one. Bender then makes a face and Brian realizes he needs change too, so he takes more change out of his pocket and hands it to Andrew. Claire (Molly Ringwald) then asks Mr. Vernon if he can break a (presumably five dollar or ten dollar) bill she has, to which he gives a disgusted groan. Too there's an additional scene after they sneak out of the library, but before they reach Bender's locker. They walk up to the faculty lounge, where Vernon is having a hard time with one of the vending machines. They each creep by quickly (Bender goes first, followed by Claire, Andrew, and Brian) except for Allison, who not only brings up the rear, but she purposely stops and stands in the doorway for a few seconds facing Vernon, as if daring him to look her way. Claire then comments, "she's nuts, but she's cool." Then she passes the doorway, and they continue towards Bender's locker. Vernon then finally looks towards the door, just as the machine finally dispenses his candy purchase.
82 of 86 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Bender (Judd Nelson) is the only member of The Breakfast Club to never be shown crying. He got close after showing his cigar burn and climbing up the stairs but he suppressed it like most abused kids.
91 of 97 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The beginning monologue is slightly different of the ending monologue. The difference shows the goal of the movie and the transformation the characters go through. From being each one for themselves and not caring about others to becoming a strong group that supports each other.
131 of 142 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
(at around 31 mins) When Carl claims that he is the eyes and ears of the high school, he says funny and sarcastic "I look through your letters, I look through your lockers", causing an evident reaction of fear in Bender. This fear is revealed (at around 45 mins) when Bender walks to his locker with the others to take the marijuana hidden in it.
18 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In the letter Brian writes to Vernon at the end of the movie, narrated by Anthony Michael Hall, Emilio Estevez, Ally Sheedy, Molly Ringwald and Judd Nelson, Brian Johnson says: "Dear Mr. Vernon, we accept the fact that we had to sacrifice a whole Saturday in detention for whatever it was we did wrong. But we think you're crazy to make us write an essay telling you who we think we are. You see us as you want to see us... In the simplest terms, in the most convenient definitions. But what we found out is that each one of us is a brain (Brian Johnson:) and an athlete (Andrew Clark:) and a basket case (Allison Reynolds:) a princess (Claire Standish:) and a criminal (John Bender:). Does that answer your question? Sincerely yours, the Breakfast Club."
27 of 29 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In 2018 Molly Ringwald (Claire Standish) wrote an article for "The New Yorker" magazine in which she criticised this film for the fact that Bender (Judd Nelson) sexually harasses, sexually assaults, and bullies Claire and that, despite this, they end up in a romantic relationship at the end.
113 of 140 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The movie is a metaphor about the social classicism and the loss of innocence. Despite to be set in 1984 (and turned with years in undisputed icon of the 80s) the main plot is a timeless tale with the five main characters incarnating the five most basic stereotypes of teenager: Claire belongs to an upper class family but which parents are in a broken marriage at the edge of the divorce, that use her as throwing weapon against the other, replacing love and affection by money and condescension. As result, she's the full-of-herself most popular girl of the high school, but suffering the pressure of friends and classmates to be perfect, unable to be herself in order to please others; Andrew belongs to a middle class family where the success is most important than love, with his abusive and rude father obsessed to be a winner and that Andrew not to be a loser. As result, Andrew is an athlete in the team of wrestling equally obsessed to win, hating the way his parents treat him and fearing to be as them; Brian belongs to a middle class family where the main objective is an A grade to graduate and have an important place in the world as businessman or CEO, follow the rules and be obedient, overprotected by his demanding parents. As result, he's a naive, shy and unsure teen in the group of nerds and geeks usually object of jokes and mocks by the popular as Claire and Andrew, who unable to accept a F grade in a class work tries to commit suicide by his school failure; John belongs to a worker-class family dominated by his violent and bully father and his shallow and inept mother, being hit and mistreated by them. As result, he's in the group of the outcast bullies and drug-smugglers, lovers of hard rock and heavy metal, pretending to be a macho including if he really falls in love with a girl for not showing his true feelings and being despised by the rest of the high school to be a thug used to the bad jokes; and as John, Allison belongs to a worker family with a parents that disregard and ignore their daughter as if she didn't exist (to be an unwanted child, perhaps), leaving her alone all the time. As result, she's an eccentric freak, outsider, free-spirited and extremely sensitive girl looking for a friendship and an affection that she never had, turning in compulsive lying and kleptomaniac as replacement of her loneliness. Because their personal circumstances, the five live separate lives in their respective groups as if it were micro-worlds isolated between them, not having relation with the rest by the social prejudices of each one about the others. The meeting in the library after to be punished by different reasons let to break the cloistered, giving them not only the chance to see the person instead the stereotype associated to each group but a perspective to compare the life they have lived and find a new way of life they would can live in the future, creating their own path for avoiding to be as their parents when they grow up.
14 of 20 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
One of the main themes in the movie is the generational conflict: Vernon despises Claire, Andrew, John, Brian and Allison by their youth, fearing not only be cared by them when he be an old man in a home retirement, but they be managing the country. It's confirmed when Vernon talks with Carl the janitor about how the students are wilder and rebels in each new school year, feeling that they turn against him by considering him a joke. In addition, all the five have troubles of communication with their respective parents, fearing to be as them when they be adult, as Andrew reveals when he is explaining the reason to be punished.
11 of 16 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page


Recently Viewed