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The Breakfast Club (1985)

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1:21 | Trailer
Five high school students meet in Saturday detention and discover how they have a lot more in common than they thought.

Director:

John Hughes

Writer:

John Hughes
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Popularity
397 ( 19)
3 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Emilio Estevez ... Andrew Clark
Paul Gleason ... Richard Vernon
Anthony Michael Hall ... Brian Johnson
John Kapelos ... Carl
Judd Nelson ... John Bender
Molly Ringwald ... Claire Standish
Ally Sheedy ... Allison Reynolds
Perry Crawford Perry Crawford ... Allison's Father
Mary Christian Mary Christian ... Brian's Sister
Ron Dean ... Andy's Father
Tim Gamble Tim Gamble ... Claire's Father
Fran Gargano Fran Gargano ... Allison's Mom
Mercedes Hall Mercedes Hall ... Brian's Mom
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Storyline

Beyond being in the same class at Shermer High School in Shermer, Illinois, Claire Standish, Andrew Clark, John Bender, Brian Johnson and Allison Reynolds have little in common, and with the exception of Claire and Andrew, do not associate with each other in school. In the simplest and in their own terms, Claire is a princess, Andrew an athlete, John a criminal, Brian a brain, and Allison a basket case. But one other thing they do have in common is a nine hour detention in the school library together on Saturday, March 24, 1984, under the direction of Mr. Vernon, supervising from his office across the hall. Each is required to write a minimum one thousand word essay during that time about who they think they are. At the beginning of those nine hours, each, if they were indeed planning on writing that essay, would probably write something close to what the world sees of them, and what they have been brainwashed into believing of themselves. But based on their adventures during that ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

They were five total strangers, with nothing in common, meeting for the first time. A brain, a beauty, a jock, a rebel and a recluse. Before the day was over, they broke the rules. Bared their souls. And touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Judd Nelson (John Bender) stayed in character off-camera, even bullying Molly Ringwald. John Hughes nearly fired him over this, but Paul Gleason (Richard Vernon) defended Nelson, saying that he was a good actor, and he was trying to get into character. See more »

Goofs

The pimples on Claire's chin appear and disappear throughout the movie. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Brian Johnson: [opening narration immediately after the title sequence] Saturday, March 24, 1984. Shermer High School, Shermer, Illinois, 60062. Dear Mr. Vernon, we accept the fact that we had to sacrifice a whole Saturday in detention for whatever it was we did wrong. What we did *was* wrong. But we think you're crazy to make us write an essay telling you who we think we are. What do you care? You see us as you want to see us - in the simplest terms, in the most convenient definitions. You see us...
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Crazy Credits

Opens with the following which then explodes from the screen. "And these children that you spit on as they try to change their worlds; are immune to your consultations, they are quite aware of what they are going through." -David Bowie See more »

Alternate Versions

Oddly enough, despite the fact that Bender's "Eat My Shorts" argument with the principal contains no profanity (and this later became Bart Simpson's trademark line in "Simpsons, The" (1989), television broadcasts re-dub the line as "Eat my socks". See more »

Connections

Referenced in AniMat's Crazy Cartoon Cast: Big Bird's Big Break (2018) See more »

Soundtracks

Didn't I Tell You
[performed by] Laurie Forsey
Produced by Keith Forsey
Words and Music by Keith Forsey and Steve Schiff
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User Reviews

One of the best portrayals of adolescent life ever done
4 April 2005 | by bppihlSee all my reviews

John Hughes is in my opinions the "king of teens." Each of his teen films is great, from "Sixteen Candles", "Pretty in Pink" (which he co-wrote and produced), and "Ferris Bueller's Day Off." They all have funny and serious moments and are classics. By the same token, "The Breakfast Club" is no exception. However, it stands out as doing the best job of the above films at portraying 80s teen life (and perhaps even teen life today) as it really was (is). Hence the familiar plot: Five high school students from different crowds in school (a nerd, a jock, a prom queen, a delinquent, and a loner) are thrown together for a Saturday detention in their school library for various reasons. Detention is supervised by the gruff and demeaning principal Richard Vernon, believably portrayed by Paul Gleason. As the day progresses, each member tells the story of why they are in detention, and by day's end they realize they have more in common than they ever imagined.

What makes the film unique is that each character tells his or her own story with credibility and persistence. Jock Andrew Clark (Emilio Estevez) is under pressure from his father to perform up to high standards, which Mr. Clark believes will add to his (dad's) lost youth. Nerd Brian Johnson (Anthony Michael Hall) excels academically, but is failing shop class. Neither he nor his family can accept an F. Delinquent John Bender (Judd Nelson), while tough on the exterior, masks a difficult home life. Prom queen Claire(Molly Ringwald) has pressure to conform from her friends, as well as issues with her parental unit. Loner Allison (Ally Sheedy) has few if any friends, wears all black, and has similar problems at home. Can the emotional bonding they share in detention hold true beyond the library, and can stereotypes be broken?

"The Breakfast Club" presents no-doubt stereotypical characters, and every member represents countless real-life examples. But what makes it so enjoyable is that applies a variety of themes to its context: prejudice/discrimination, acceptance/tolerance, diversity, class/status differences, family matters, group dynamics, etc. It also encourages us to look at others and ourselves beyond surface-level appearances. Finally, "The Breakfast Club" has great 1980s pop culture and societal integrations, from the soundtrack with Simple Minds "Don't You (Forget about Me), to wealthy, surburban American life (haves and have nots), and superficial values of the "me" decade. It reminds us that there truly is diversity in all of us. We are different, but we are all "the same" in one way or another.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

-Making-of | Official Facebook

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

15 February 1985 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Breakfast Club See more »

Filming Locations:

Park Ridge, Illinois, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$5,107,599, 18 February 1985

Gross USA:

$45,875,171

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$51,525,171
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono | Dolby Stereo (uncredited)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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