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Director Michael Apted interviews the same group of British-born adults after a 7 year wait as to the changes that have occurred in their lives during the last seven years.

Director:

Michael Apted
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3 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Bruce Balden ... Self (as Bruce)
Jacqueline Bassett Jacqueline Bassett ... Self (as Jackie)
Symon Basterfield Symon Basterfield ... Self (as Simon)
Andrew Brackfield ... Self (as Andrew)
John Brisby John Brisby ... Self (archive footage) (as John)
Peter Davies ... Self (as Peter)
Suzanne Dewey Suzanne Dewey ... Self (as Suzi)
Charles Furneaux Charles Furneaux ... Self (archive footage) (as Charles)
Nicholas Hitchon ... Self (as Nick)
Neil Hughes Neil Hughes ... Self (as Neil)
Lynn Johnson Lynn Johnson ... Self (as Lynn)
Paul Kligerman Paul Kligerman ... Self (as Paul)
Susan Sullivan Susan Sullivan ... Self (as Sue)
Tony Walker ... Self (as Tony)
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Storyline

Director Michael Apted revisits the same group of British-born adults after a 7 year wait. The subjects are interviewed as to the changes that have occurred in their lives during the last seven years. Written by Murray Chapman <muzzle@cs.uq.oz.au>

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Did You Know?

Trivia

First of two theatrically released documentary feature films directed by Michael Apted. The first was 28 Up (1984) and the second Bring on the Night (1985). Apted is an interviewer in both of these feature docs. See more »

Quotes

Neil Hughes: If the state didn't give us any money, it would probably just mean crime and I'm glad I don't have to steal to keep myself alive. If the money runs out then for a few days there's nowhere to go and that's all you can do, I simply have to find the warmest shed I can find.
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Connections

Referenced in The 50 Greatest Documentaries (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

What Would I Do
Written by Stanley Alexander
Performed by The Monotones
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User Reviews

 
the voyage of life
11 January 2011 | by mjneu59See all my reviews

"Give me the child until he is seven, and I will give you the man." So goes the old proverb, and the proof is in this fascinating documentary, the fourth chapter in an ambitious, ongoing epic of non-fiction filmmaking already two decades in the making at the time.

The project began in the middle 1960s as a modest examination of English class divisions in a group of seven-year old children from different social backgrounds, and has been updated every seven years to show their progress through adolescence to young adulthood. Each individual biography resists the pre-determined notions of (specifically English) status and privilege around which the entire cycle of films is based, becoming instead a record of the same, sometimes rocky path to maturity followed by everyone, regardless of upbringing. At age seven every child is carefree and impressionable; at fourteen most are sullen and inhibited, uncomfortable in puberty; at twenty-one they are, by degrees, poised to reach their potential: eager and naive or cynical and confused.

And by age 28 their niche in society has been secured, for better or (sadly) for worse. The candid self-analysis, and the range of insight and opinion, makes the film (individually, and as a series) an invaluable document of human growth and development, as well as an irresistible reminder of our own personal destiny.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English | Latin

Release Date:

February 1986 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

28 лет See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Granada Television See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono
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