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Forest Whitaker to Star in Epix Crime Drama Godfather of Harlem

Forest Whitaker to Star in Epix Crime Drama Godfather of Harlem
Forest Whitaker is about to get mobbed.

The Empire star will headline and executive-produce Godfather of Harlem, a crime drama that Epix ordered straight to series on Wednesday.

Per the official announcement, Whitaker will play crime boss Bumpy Johnson in the 10-episode series, which is based on real-life events. After spending a decade in prison, Johnson was released in the early 1960s to find that the Italian mob had taken over his neighborhood. He then allied with Malcolm X to fight the Genovese crime family to regain control of the streets.

In a statement, Whitaker said Godfather of Harlem is
See full article at TVLine.com »

Book Review: "Conversations with Classic Films Stars: Interviews From Hollywood’s Golden Era" & "You Ain’t Heard Nothin’ Yet: Interviews with Stars From Hollywood’s Golden Era" by James Bawde

  • CinemaRetro
By Adrian Smith

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James Bawden was a TV columnist for the Toronto Star, and Ron Miller was TV editor at the San Jose Mercury News and is a former president of the Television Critics Association. During their respective careers stretching back some fifty years the list of stars they have interviewed reads like a Who’s Who of Hollywood. These two volumes bring together an incredible assortment of interviews from almost the birth of cinema itself, with Buster Keaton, Jackie Coogan and Gloria Swanson representing the silent era. The great leading men are all here, including James Stewart, Henry Fonda, Kirk Douglas, Victor Mature and Cary Grant, and of course classic leading ladies like Bette Davis, Janet Leigh, Fay Wray and Joan Fontaine. Along the way they also met character actors and horror stars like Ernest Borgnine, Victor Buono, John Carradine, and Lon Chaney Jr.,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Dirty Dancing And Its Never-Dying Popularity

Back in 1987, a film was released which took the world by storm. With a budget of just $6 million, Dirty Dancing, which has just celebrated its 30th anniversary, was to star the relatively unknown Patrick Swayze, a young actor who, up until that point was most known for his work on the TV series North and South, and the minor hit Red Dawn. Its safe to say that the film’s eventual reach wasn’t predicted, the movie billed as a simple teenage romance, set in the 1960s, with little expectation at its conception.

Of course, Dirty Dancing has since become a global success, an enduring teenage-heartbreak/ love story that sits alongside other greats like Grease and even Hairspray, the former being released nearly ten years before.

Set during the summer of 1963, Dirty Dancing revolves around a 17-year-old girl named Frances ‘Baby’ Houseman (Jennifer Grey), who has journeyed to the Kellerman
See full article at The Hollywood News »

David Ogden Stiers, Major Winchester on ‘Mash,’ Dies at 75

David Ogden Stiers, Major Winchester on ‘Mash,’ Dies at 75
David Ogden Stiers, best known for his role as the arrogant surgeon Major Charles Emerson Winchester III on “Mash,” died Saturday. He was 75.

His agent, Mitchell K. Stubbs, tweeted that he died of bladder cancer at his home in Newport, Ore.

For his work on “Mash,” Stiers was twice Emmy nominated for outstanding supporting actor in a comedy or variety or music series, in 1981 and 1982, and he earned a third Emmy nomination for his performance in NBC miniseries “The First Olympics: Athens 1896” as William Milligan Sloane, the founder of the U.S. Olympic Committee.

The actor, with his educated, resonant
See full article at Variety - TV News »

This Is Us Recap: All the Wrong Moves

This Is Us Recap: All the Wrong Moves
Need to catch up? Check out the previous This Is Us recap here.

There are some Friday nights under the lights that even Coach Taylor wouldn’t be able to save.

Kevin has one of ’em in this week’s This Is Us, which chronicles two fraught nights in the Pearson sibling’s life: one where he first busts his knee, thus ending his dreams of collegiate and professional football glory, and one where he returns to his high school, literally high, and makes a chain of very poor choices.

And that’s all before the episode’s worst development comes to light.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Video: On This Day, September 14- Remembering Patrick Swayze

Patrick Swayze, a three-time Golden Globe nominated actor, dancer, and singer-songwriter is best-known as the romantic lead in 'Dirty Dancing' and 'Ghost', and for the 'North and South' TV-series. His first professional job was as a dancer for Disney on Parade. In the 70's, the Texas native moved to New York to further his formal dance training. He studied with the Harkness Ballet Company, and then the Joffrey, before joining the Eliot Feld Ballet as a principal dancer.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Hal Holbrook, Veteran Actor Who Played Lincoln, Defends Nate Parker

  • The Wrap
Hal Holbrook, Veteran Actor Who Played Lincoln, Defends Nate Parker
Hal Holbrook, the veteran actor who became known for portraying Abraham Lincoln in a number of television events, came to the defense of Nate Parker and his film “The Birth of a Nation” in a letter to the editor of The New York Times on Friday. The conversation surrounding Parker’s 1999 rape allegations stirred public opinion and, apparently, has affected box office sales. Holbrook, the 91-year-old actor who played Lincoln in the miniseries “North and South” (books I and II) and “Lincoln,” a miniseries that ran 1974-1976, told The New York Times that people, basically, need to get over it and.
See full article at The Wrap »

Mark Wahlberg, Patrick Stewart Praise Seth MacFarlane’s Originality at ‘Ted 2′ Premiere

Mark Wahlberg, Patrick Stewart Praise Seth MacFarlane’s Originality at ‘Ted 2′ Premiere
When Universal Pictures gave creator-director-star Seth MacFarlane the greenlight to make a sequel to his surprise hit “Ted” after it grossed nearly $550 million at the worldwide box office in 2012 to become the highest-grossing original R-rated comedy of all time, he vowed to make the tale about a man (Mark Wahlberg) and his foul-mouthed teddy bear as smart, witty and fun as the original despite the enormous expectations.

“To be honest, there was some personal pressure, but my goal was to tell a completely new story and not rehash the same movie twice,” MacFarlane told Variety at the world premiere of “Ted 2″ held at New York’s Ziegfeld Theatre on Wednesday. “We wanted to do an entirely new story that explores an entirely new aspect of Ted’s life and evolve the character with funny jokes. Ted fighting for his civil rights is different than the smaller relationships story that
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Paradigm Signs Helmer John Stockwell

Exclusive: Following the release of his latest feature, the true story marijuana trafficking pic Kid Cannabis, multi-hyphenate John Stockwell has signed with Paradigm. The actor, writer, director and producer started his career acting in films like Losin’ It and Top Gun, both opposite Tom Cruise, starred in miniseries North and South, and battled a killer car in Stephen King’s Christine. Stockwell’s screenwriting credits include Blue Crush, Rock Star, Under Cover, Dangerously Close, and Kid Cannabis. He also wrote the Emmy-nominated telefilm Seal Team Six: The Raid on Osama Bin Laden, episodes of Showtime’s The L Word, and Cheaters. The latter earned Stockwell an Emmy nod for Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries or a Movie. He broke through as a director with 2001′s Crazy/Beautiful and 2002′s surfing pic Blue Crush, following with a run of features behind the camera including Into the Blue, Turistas, Cat Run, and Dark Tide.
See full article at Deadline TV »

James Rebhorn obituary

Actor who played FBI agents, cops and traditional fathers

Anyone looking for an actor to play an unyielding martinet could hardly have done better over the last few decades than to cast James Rebhorn, who has died aged 65 after suffering from skin cancer. Poker-thin and poker-faced, this white-haired, crinkle-eyed performer excelled at bringing a glint of bureaucratic bloody-mindedness to small parts that might otherwise have slipped past unnoticed. He could be sympathetic too, even slightly buffoonish, as proved by his turn as the father of the gadabout Dickie Greenleaf (Jude Law) in The Talented Mr Ripley (1999), but he could also turn on a dime from charm to vindictiveness.

His speciality was playing officialdom in all its manifestations: cops, FBI agents, doctors, politicians. Asked in 2012 about his repeated appearances in legal dramas (he starred on television in Boston Legal, Law & Order, The Practice and The Good Wife, among others), he drew
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

James Rebhorn obituary

Actor who played FBI agents, cops and traditional fathers

Anyone looking for an actor to play an unyielding martinet could hardly have done better over the last few decades than to cast James Rebhorn, who has died aged 65 after suffering from skin cancer. Poker-thin and poker-faced, this white-haired, crinkle-eyed performer excelled at bringing a glint of bureaucratic bloody-mindedness to small parts that might otherwise have slipped past unnoticed. He could be sympathetic too, even slightly buffoonish, as proved by his turn as the father of the gadabout Dickie Greenleaf (Jude Law) in The Talented Mr Ripley (1999), but he could also turn on a dime from charm to vindictiveness.

His speciality was playing officialdom in all its manifestations: cops, FBI agents, doctors, politicians. Asked in 2012 about his repeated appearances in legal dramas (he starred on television in Boston Legal, Law & Order, The Practice and The Good Wife, among others), he drew
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Blu-ray Review: Capt. John Noel's The Epic Of Everest From The BFI

The ill-fated 1924 attempt to reach the peak of Mount Everest was an incredibly politically charged undertaking, with British authorities desperate to reaffirm the country's superiority as a world force after recent attempts to be the first nation to reach both the North and South Poles had failed. An earlier attempt to reach the highest point on Earth two years previously had also ended without success, but mountaineer George Mallory was determined to try again. As with the previous attempts, the 1924 expedition was financed by the Royal Geographic Society and the Alpine Club, together with a sizeable contribution from Captain John Noel, in return for securing all photographic rights to the expedition. During his years with the British army in India, Noel had spent time...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Sydney Speaks Legalese (sort of!)

Lawyer Herald's Jared Feldschreiber interviewed me.  This is an interview I am proud of.  Hope you like it too:

It may be easy to dismiss the film industry as a glitzy and glamor show of millionaires living on an island all to themselves. The international scope of the film business world, however, should not be so easily overlooked. There, one can find a kinetic industry with savvy and passionate wheelers-and-dealers who are very well-versed in areas like acquisition, distribution and producing.

Take for instance the annual American Film Market, which is held every November in Santa Monica. Over 8,000 industry leaders from over 70 countries converge to discuss the "art of the deal," providing the necessary business steps to get films financed and distributed. Those who attend Afm include executives, agents, attorneys, directors, distributors, festival directors, financiers and film commissioners.

Sydney Levine is a seasoned business professional of the screen trade. Carrying nearly 40 years of film business acumen, Ms. Levine has also shown a generosity of spirit, in that she routinely encourages filmmakers and national organizations to achieve their goals of financing, making and selling their films worldwide. She also continues to provide various services to distributors, international sales agents and festival programmers. She also leads seminars and workshops worldwide.

In 1975, Ms. Levine became the first woman to work with international film distribution which she did at 20th Century Fox International. She later became an Acquisitions Executive for Lorimar during the early days of the video industry, and later was Vice President of Acquisitions for Republic Pictures.

In 1988, Ms. Levine founded FilmFinders, the industry's premier database, which tracked worldwide films for acquisition executives. Twenty years later, FilmFinders and its sister company Withoutabox were acquired by International Movie Database (IMDb).

Ms. Levine continues to steadfastly work as an exemplar of film business. Her blog SydneysBuzz, featured on IndieWire, is "the perfect mesh of the film industry where festival, markets and data meet and merge."

Here, in an Exclusive Interview with Lawyer Herald by Jared Feldschreiber, Sydney Levine has provided her insights, which speak to the multifaceted dynamism of the film business world.

Lawyer Herald : Describe your ascent within film business, with particular emphasis of the acquisition, distribution, producing and the selling. What were your primary responsibilities in the beginning of your career?

Sydney Levine : After my early years in the film business in L.A., I was hired to acquire films - first shorts, then great international art-house features for Lorimar Home Video, the largest independent video company when video was at its height working with such theatrical distributors as Orion Pictures Classics (now Sony Pictures Classics). Responsibilities at Lorimar and later Republic Pictures included tracking all new films, screening those most likely to fit my company's profile, working within the company to create sales projections, negotiating within and with the outside rights owner, creating the deal memo, and then working with our company's attorney to be sure key points were included in the contract.

Lh: Fast forward twenty years when you created FilmFinders, the industry's premier database for acquisition executives. What did that venture entail?

Sl: When video reached its maturity - or rather hit a wall - I created the first database in the business which tracked every new film, info on story, director, writer, producer, cast and contacts, international rights availabilities for all 60 territories. Most international sales agents and distributors around the world subscribed to it and it kept my company thriving from 1988 to 2006 for 20 years until we merged with Withoutabox and sold the new entity to IMDb, an Amazon company.

Lh : What are the financial 'risks' associated with film distribution? Give the breakdown of 'all things considered' when turning a piece of art, such as film, into a viable financial product?

Sl : This is a lecture or a consulting question I answer all the time. When national economies have problems, which they invariably do, money that was seen as "normal" suddenly disappears. Film, when it is an art (sometimes it is purely entertainment), is still a "popular" art or a "commercial" art. It must be seen, people must pay for seeing it so that the rights owner can recoup the cost of the "product", make a profit, which gives the producer, director or the writer the reputation to continue to make more movies.

Lh : How does an aspiring film artist bridge the gap between his vision and the realities of commercialism?

Sl : The gap is between creativity and commerce. Distribution is commerce. "If it doesn't spread it's dead," to quote my favorite transmedia guru, Henry Jenkins. The artist must keep in mind the end user/ audience from the moment she or he conceives of the idea through completion and must find the middlemen/ women who understand the end-user mentality and so want to be a part of the commercial side of the movie.

  :

Lh: Give a breakdown to the legal ramifications of international film.

Sl : All I can say is that all rights - from music, synchronization, scripts, even a poster or piece of art in the film must have legal clearance Before the film is seen by the public.

Lh: What legal hurdles do you face constantly as a film distributor?

Sl: Collecting money.

Lh: Film icon Francis Coppola said in a 2009 interview that "in the early days... they didn't know how to make movies. They had an image and it moved and the audience loved it... The cinema language happened by experimentation by people not knowing what to do. But unfortunately, after 15-20 years, it became a commercial industry. People made money in the cinema, and then they began to say to the pioneers, 'Don't experiment. We want to make money. We don't want to take chances.'

In light of these remarks, what are the inherent differences and perhaps mistrust between a film's financier/ distributor and the film artist?

Sl: The business is an art in itself which outside business people cannot understand. It is very volatile when artists and business people mix. Coppola is full of it because true filmmakers are still artists today and they are still working at creating the world through moving pictures. The major studios are running another sort of "business" where their bottom line is rarely the film itself but all the accoutrements, ancillary merchandising, games, amusement parks, real estate business which uses a big vehicle called a Motion Picture as the locomotive to pull the rest. The studios are not in the business of making art, though occasionally a work of art does get made, but rarely. Art does not make enough money for them.

Lh : What kinds of things do you perform with buyers and sellers abroad?

Sl: I still work with buyers, sellers and more importantly the market during Cannes and Berlin, where I work with them on their database (Cinando, which I gave to Jerome Paillard, the director of the Cannes Marche, when he started that job) and I make sure buyers from North and South America and now Asia (except for China) are updating their acquisitions and qualifying for the markets in Cannes and Berlin.

Lh: How important is legal representation for those working in film business?

Sl: A producer, however experienced in deal making, should never undertake to negotiate a deal without a lawyer speaking for her or him, and every lawyer, no matter how experienced, needs to know the particular desires of his or her client in order to translate the wishes into legal terms.

Lh: What are you planning on doing leading up to the Oscars?

Sl: Go to the German pre-Oscar party at Villa Aurora in Pacific Palisades, going to Spirit Awards of Film Independent and the IFC after-party in Santa Monica California.

Lh: On the subject of the Oscars, what does it mean when people speak of its 'politics?' How does this cliche apply during awards season? What sort of cajoling, persuading or influence do studios or publicists have in shaping who will win?

Sl : Politics is the art of persuading people, manipulating the right one at the right time. It helps if you are "one of the guys" of course, but that is not the point of politics. Knowing what critics to approach before the Academy Awards for instance, is an issue because it feeds into the perception of the Academy members when they look at films.

Some like particular kinds of films and even particular critics, and others do not like those, so you need to know which publicist to choose, and the publicist must know which critics to invite to which screenings and why that is the case, which of course, depends on which films one is handling.

Lh: Can the voting be deduced into a kind of 'cronyism,' to borrow another term in politics?

Sl: Knowing what sort of "inducements" are legal, knowing what Academy members to invite (when in theory you don't have any real list of members), this is politics. Lots of stuff called politics goes into an Academy Awards' campaign and it is not "cronyism" which wins. Sometimes people think politics is cronyism and it is to a degree, but there are lots of members of the Academy. Some vote early on, some vote later.  (To readers, this interview was done before the Oscars.  Looking back at the Oscars, I wonder if The Wolf Of Wall Street was shut out because the company behind it - Red Granite - was such an outsider.  But that does not answer why American Hustle also failed to reap any recognition.)

Lh: What are you working on right now and where are you?

Sl: I am writing a book with the backing of El Patronato de Guadalajara on Iberoamerican Film Financing. I am teaching International Film Marketing, Sales and Distribution at Woodbury University in Burbank, California. I am also blogging for IndieWire and ImdbPro, working with the Cannes and European Film Markets.  I am currently in Berlin. My partner, Peter Belsito is consulting with film producers, festivals and countries on strategies for entering the market.

Lh: What adjectives (or expletives) would you use to describe the marriage of film and business?

Sl: Volatile, risky, sometimes impossible, sometimes very difficult.

*This interview was originally published in LawyerHerald.com
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Deadline’s Oscars Blog: ‘12 Years A Slave’, ‘Gravity’ And Boredom Reign Supreme

Deadline’s Oscars Blog: ‘12 Years A Slave’, ‘Gravity’ And Boredom Reign Supreme
Here we are again after the Golden Globes, Mike Fleming and Anita Busch taking on the task of play by play during the most wide-open Oscar race we can remember. Even on the party circuit, industry insiders who usually have a grasp of who’ll walk away with Oscars were evenly torn between Alfonso Cuaron’s 3D masterpiece Gravity and Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave. Then again, there were so many terrific films that got Best Picture nominations, and all of them have at least a puncher’s chance at an upset. Related: Oscars: Pete Hammond’s Absolute Final Predictions That includes American Hustle, where David O Russell co-wrote the Best Original Script nominee with Eric Warren Singer and got tour de force performances and nominations for Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence. Perfs so strong there was no room on the nomination roster for perennial Oscar nominee Jeremy Renner.
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Oscars Lowdown 2014: Best Production Design - Will 'Gatsby' bling its way to the win?

  • Hitfix
Oscars Lowdown 2014: Best Production Design - Will 'Gatsby' bling its way to the win?
In the lead-up to the 86th annual Academy Awards on March 2, HitFix will be bringing you the lowdown on all 24 Oscar categories with multiple entries each day. Take a few notes and bone up on the competition as we give you the edge in your office Oscar pool! As in Best Costume Design -- the category with which its outcome so frequently goes hand-in-hand -- ornamental period pieces and extravagant fantasies tend to dominate the Best Production Design category. So it's nice that the Academy gave us a fairly varied field this year: period pieces may still make up the majority of the field, but one is of a recent vintage, while the others could hardly be more opposed in their approach to days of year. Meanwhile, neither the futuristic fantasy nor the hi-tech outer-space adventure are as excessively designed as you might expect from nominees in this race. Moreover,
See full article at Hitfix »

Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 Demo Now Available!

Ready for a taste of Dracula’s imminent return? If so, you'll be happy to hear that Konami has released a playable demo of its eagerly awaited Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 in North and South America.

The full game is scheduled to be released on February 25th for Playstation®3, PlayStation®Network, Xbox 360, Xbox Live® Games on Demand, and Steam® for PC; and demos for all formats are now available digitally.

The demo allows users to become familiar with the game's many new advances, including an all-new controllable camera, vast locations, and intuitive combat elements.

The specially-tailored demo gives players control over Dracula as his castle comes under siege from the Brotherhood of Light and their armies. It acts as a prelude to the full game, allowing players to wield an assortment of weapons such as the energy-replenishing Void Sword (see the video below for more info) and the armor-destroying Chaos Claws.
See full article at Dread Central »

Miff winners to be screened at Fd Zone, Mumbai on Feb 15

What:

Special Screening of award winners @ Miff’2014

When:

15th February, 2014- Through the day.

Entry:

Free.

Venue:

Rr Theatre, 10th floor,

Films Division

24, Pedder Road,

Mumbai-400026

About the event:

10 am

Have You Seen The Arana ? by Sunanda Bhatt

Best Documentary Film, National (Above 40 mins.)

Best Cinematographer — Saumyananda Sahi

Best Sound Recordist — Chistopher Burchell

11.30 am

In Between : Isang Yun in North and South Korea by Maria Stodtmeier

Best Documentary Film, International (Above 60 mins.)

12.45 pm

Seven Hundred Zero Zero Seven by Altaf Mazid

Best Documentary Film, National (Upto 40 mins.)

Tamaash (The Puppet ) by Satyanshu Singh and Devanshu Singh

Best Short Fiction Film National (Upto 45 Mins.)

Best Cinematographer — Sahir Raza

Best Sound Recordist — Yatin Dabhi, Manoj Sikka, Abhishek Bhattathiri

Black Rock by Vikrant Janardan Pawar

Best Short Fiction Film International (Upto 45 Mins.)

Best Sound Recordist — Dilip Kumar Ahirwar

2.45pm

True Love Story by Gitanjali Rao

Best Animation Film

Screening followed by discussion
See full article at DearCinema.com »

Nishtha Jain wins Best Director, Gitanjali Rao’s “True Love Story” Best Animation at Miff 2014

Nishtha Jain wins Best Director, Gitanjali Rao’s “True Love Story” Best Animation at Miff 2014
Gitanjai Rao’s “True Love Story” won Golden Conch for Best Animation Film at Miff 2014

Nishtha Jain’s documentary ‘Gulabi Gang’, won her the Best Director Award in the International Competition section of Mumbai International Film Festival (Miff). The film is releasing on February 21 under PVR Director’s Rare banner.

The seven day festival dedicated to documentary, Shorts and Animation films concluded in Mumbai today.

Gulabi Gang’ tells the story of Sampat Pal and her group of women vigilantes and activists from Bundelkhand, who fight for womens’ rights and their empowerment. Armed with a lathi (stick) the Gulabis visit abusive husbands and beat them up unless they stop abusing their wives. The film has won several other award.

Read Nishtha Jain’S Interview Here

Golden Conch Best Animation Film award to ‘True Love Story’ by Gitanjali Rao

The Golden Conch Best Animation Film award went to ‘True Love Story’ by Gitanjali Rao.
See full article at DearCinema.com »

‘Klondike’ Closes Lower on Wednesday for Discovery

‘Klondike’ Closes Lower on Wednesday for Discovery
Three-part miniseries “Klondike,” the first scripted project for Discovery network, closed with a ratings downturn on Wednesday.

Nielsen estimates that an average audience of 2.85 million watched Wednesday’s two-hour conclusion, down from 3.13 million for Tuesday and 3.4 million for Monday’s opening installment. It saw a similar decline in adults 25-54 (1.4 on Monday, 1.3 on Tuesday and 1.1 on Wednesday) and 18-49 (1.1, 1.0, 0.9).

Klondike,” based on Charlotte Gray’s novel “Gold Diggers” and starring Richard Madden and Augustus Prew as adventurers in search of gold in the Yukon Wilderness during the 1890s, was put in development a few months after History scored monster numbers (more than 13 million viewers) for its three-night “Hatfields & McCoys.”

Sam Shepard, Abbie Cornish and Tim Roth also star in the mini, a co-production between Discovery, independent studio Entertainment One (eOne), and Nomadic Pictures, in association with Ridley Scott’s Scott Free Productions.

Discovery has wanted to get in the scripted game,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

BBC Worldwide Formally Announces Doctor Who Comics Deal With Titan

As we told you last summer, the BBC and Idw were bringing their distribution license for Doctor Who comics to a close, and that Titan Comics had apparently won the prize to be the next distribution companion for the comic book series.

Today, BBC Worldwide has released the official announcement, and promises adventures featuring the Tenth and Eleventh Doctors, to be joined by adventures of the Twelfth Doctor once the new season premieres later this year.

Here’s that announcement:

Doctor Who Regenerates With Titan Comics BBC Worldwide and Titan Comics team up for all-new Doctor Who comic book adventures

New York, NY – January 21, 2014 – In the universe of Doctor Who regenerations bring not only a new Doctor but often a fresh look and feel to the series and BBC Worldwide is bringing that same approach to Doctor Who comics as it signs a new deal with Titan Comics. The deal
See full article at ScifiMafia »
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