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Good grief! Danger Mouse and Duckula star in animation exhibition

Show at Waterside arts centre in Sale explores work of Cosgrove Hall, one of Britain’s most successful studios

The world’s only vegetarian vampire and an eyepatch-wearing, mystery-solving mouse are celebrated in a new exhibition that pays tribute to one of Britain’s most successful animation studios.

Count Duckula, who shunned meat after being resurrected with ketchup instead of blood, and Danger Mouse, the world’s greatest secret agent, are two of the stars of a new show exploring the work of Cosgrove Hall, an independent animation company based in Manchester.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Beano Studios announces voice cast and character details for Dennis & Gnasher: Unleashed

Beano Studios has announced the main voice cast for the upcoming CG animated show Dennis & Gnasher: Unleashed, a 52-part series based upon the iconic comic book character, which is set to hit Cbbc later this year.

Joining previously announced Freddie Fox (The Mystery of Edwin Drood; The Three Musketeers; Worried About The Boy) – who voices Dennis – are Kathryn Drysdale, Rasmus Hardiker, Ryan Sampson, Joanna Ruiz and Kelly-Marie Stewart.

Rasmus (Lead Balloon, Scream Street, Danger Mouse) joins the cast as Dennis’ archrival, the pompous Walter, who is always out to ruin the fun for Dennis and his pals. Following his famed role as Count Duckula in Danger Mouse, Rasmus is the ideal fit for the sneaky and self-centered Walter, who will do anything it takes to be the teacher’s pet. Always cunning and quick to boss around the other kids, he never misses an opportunity to exploit his status as
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The 24 Most Important Vampire TV Shows Ever, Ranked

  • Indiewire
The 24 Most Important Vampire TV Shows Ever, Ranked
Today is the 20th anniversary of the “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” premiere, and the day that “The Vampire Diaries” airs its series finale — a day sure to go down in broadcast history as Vampire TV Day.

But those two shows are far from the only ones to depict bloodsuckers (to use a pejorative term) on screen, and IndieWire has dusted off the TV crypt to unearth a ranker of our favorite fangs.

Yes, we know there’s a lot at stake here.

Read More: 20 Years After ‘Buffy,’ Have Vampire TV Shows Met Their True Death?

Some rules for this list: At least one of the series regulars has to be a vampire. Also, no kids shows (sorry, “My Babysitter’s A Vampire”), no animation (sorry, “Count Duckula”), no foreign language shows (sorry, South Korea — wow, you guys like vampires) and no miniseries or anthology series (which is why “American Horror Story: Hotel
See full article at Indiewire »

Second Life: Old Kids' Shows That Are Making a Comeback

Love them or hate them, reboots are here to stay -- until they get remade once again. And while some franchises are better left alone (cough, cough, "Fuller House"), others are even stronger the second time around, especially when you're not old enough to remember the original. Here's a look at the best and worst kids' shows making comebacks faster than you can say "cannibalizing my childhood."

'The Powerpuff Girls' (1998 - 2005)

Way back in 1998, Cartoon Network did something amazing and produced a cartoon that was equal parts "Spider-Man," "My Little Pony," and Ms. Magazine: "The Powerpuff Girls." Audiences eager to see that girls could kick butt too responded strongly, keeping the show on the air for seven years. The carefully crafted blend of silliness, standard villain plots, and adorable sisters charmed kids all over the world, spawning merchandise, cosplay, and even a full-length feature film. So naturally, a reboot was inevitable,
See full article at Moviefone »

Sony Plans A Danger Mouse Movie

Sony Plans A Danger Mouse Movie
Recently revived on TV with Alexander Armstrong, Kevin Eldon and Stephen Fry among the voice cast, Danger Mouse is also set to storm the big screen. Sony Pictures Animation and StudioCanal have hatched a plan for a movie, with producers Neal Moritz and Toby Ascher overseeing the diminutive super-spy shenanigans.Starting life as an animated series from Cosgrove Hall in the early '80s, Danger Mouse was a secret agent, channelling James Bond and Danger Man, and getting involved in a lot of very silly nonsense on a weekly basis.He lived underneath a pillar box on Baker Street and drove a flying car; his sidekick was the blundering hamster Penfold; his "M" was Colonel K. (a chinchilla); and his arch enemy was the wheezy toad Baron Greenback, who had a crow henchman called Stiletto and was always up to dastardly schemes like trying to melt the North Pole. Occasional secondary villains included Count Duckula,
See full article at EmpireOnline »

The top 50 80s kids' TV themes

From Bananaman to Grange Hill, join us in a spot of TV nostalgia as we celebrate 50 great 1980s kids' TV theme songs...

There comes a time to turn away from the horrors of the world and retreat underneath the soft, comforting duvet of nostalgia. That time is Friday. That metaphorical duvet is below.

Here are fifty of the best kids’ TV theme songs (spread over two pages and in arbitrary order) of the 1980s. Some, like Alan Hawkshaw’s distinctive Grange Hill intro, are unarguable classics of the era, while others, like Mike Harding's Count Duckula, only started in the late-eighties and spent the rest of their run in the next decade.

Obviously, there being only 50 on this list, we may have missed out your favourite (deliberately or otherwise). Let us know if so, but remember that links may take a while to appear in the comments thread because
See full article at Den of Geek »

Game of Thrones star Lena Headey and John Oliver join Cbbc's Danger Mouse

Lena Headey and John Oliver are joining the vocal cast of Cbbc's Danger Mouse.

It was announced during a Danger Mouse panel at Comic-Con this weekend that the Game of Thrones star and the Last Week Tonight host are joining the show's second series.

Headey will play Us Secret Agent Jeopardy Mouse, while Oliver will play the mad wolf scientist Dr Augustus P Crumhorn III.

Headey said: "I wanted to do it [Danger Mouse] because it was pure nostalgia for me.

"I have children now and it's just a treat to be involved in something that you loved as a kid and be able to share it. Those moments as an actor that come along once in while are not to be missed."

Oliver added: "I've loved Danger Mouse my whole life. Danger Mouse was a significant part of my childhood.

"So to get a chance to do it is like getting
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Saturday Morning Cartoon: The Punny Charms of ‘Count Duckula’

Dracula Untold was out last weekend, starring burgeoning (maybe?) Hollywood talent Luke Evans as the title vampire. Or, rather, as the title historical figure with a particular fondness for bats. This is one of those Vlad the Impaler-focused stories, moving to the source material of this age-old Balkan legend. As usual, I won’t dive into the details of whether this particular new release is terrible. Instead, let’s look at some much more successfully entertaining Transylvanian fare. It may not involve Dominic Cooper but it does involve ducks. I am talking, of course, about the evergreen ridiculousness of Count Duckula, scion of the line of Duckula. As the opening credits explain, he was resurrected by his scheming butler Igor and gregarious Nanny when the moon was in the eighth house of Aquarius. They accidentally used ketchup instead of blood in the ritual, so he’s the world’s first vegetarian vampire. He
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

'Danger Mouse' revival is on its way at BBC

  • Hitfix
'Danger Mouse' revival is on its way at BBC
(Cbr) Brace yourselves, ’80s animation fans: The BBC has announced it’s dusting off "Danger Mouse," with some help from FreemantleMedia and Boulder Media. Few details were revealed, but FreemantleMedia said that the super-spy’s familiar eye patch will be replaced by an updated i-patch featuring all kinds of technological goodies. Originally airing from 1981 to 1992, "Danger Mouse" followed the exploits of the world’s best secret agent and his timid assistant Penfold, who had a tendency to get in the way or, worse, get kidnapped. The series and its spinoff Count Duckula aired in the United States on Nickelodeon. “The thrills, spills and comedy of this landmark international animated series are all still here but this rebooted version will be brought up-to-date for today’s tech-savvy and content-hungry kids,” Freemantle’s Rick Glanker said in a statement. “In this new 21st-century version the laughs are set to be even louder
See full article at Hitfix »

"Danger Mouse" Rebooted For The Cbbc

Over two decades since it wrapped, much loved 1980s British cartoon series "Danger Mouse" is coming out of retirement with FremantleMedia Kids & Family Entertainment teaming with the BBC to produce a 52-episode new series to air on Cbbc next year in the UK.

A parody of the Bond films and TV's "Danger Man", the Cosgrove Hall Films production followed an eye-patched white mouse who is also the world's greatest secret agent. He and his bespectacled and reluctant hamster assistant Penfold work out of their base within a red postbox.

Together they battled the evil machinations of the wheezy voiced toad Baron Silas Greenback and his crow assistant Stiletto Mafiosa. On occasion the vampire Count Duckula was the antagonist, and he went on to score his own spin-off series.

161 episodes were produced over a decade and the show proved to be an international hit, even in the United States market where
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Danger Mouse Will Return!

Danger Mouse Will Return!
First it was Bananaman that was being unpeeled for a new generation. Now, from a post box somewhere on Baker Street, cartoon superspy Danger Mouse is about to get the same treatment. Current rights-holders Fremantle have decided to bring him out of his 23-year retirement, thanks to some strong ratings during a Citv retro weekend, albeit on the small screen rather than the large.An animated series from Cosgrove Hall in the early '80s, Danger Mouse was a secret agent, channelling James Bond and Danger Man, and getting involved in a lot of very silly nonsense on a weekly basis. He drove a flying car; his sidekick was the blundering hamster Penfold; his "M" was Colonel K. (a chinchilla); and his arch enemy was the wheezy toad Baron Greenback, who had a crow henchman called Stiletto, and was always up to dastardly schemes like trying to melt the North Pole.
See full article at EmpireOnline »

Our Five Favorite Vintage Vampire Board Games

  • FEARnet
Our Five Favorite Vintage Vampire Board Games
These days you can't throw a rock without breaking a vital piece of a serious, strategic, horror board game. But just because the board game industry is blowing up now doesn't mean we didn't have plenty of awesome games in ages past! The years have afforded us tons of bizarre, fun, challenging, and silly horror board games, and we'd hate to see them lost to the sands of time. Here's a look at our first collection of vintage games worth revisiting: Vampire Board Games!

The Fury of Dracula - Games Workshop (1987)

Here's a game of cat and mouse (or should we say bat and mouse) that was truly ahead of its time. 'The Fury of Dracula,' for two to four players, set one player against the rest of the table in a race to control Europe. One player assumes the role of Dracula, who sneaks around a map of the European countryside.
See full article at FEARnet »

Dracula: 10 on-screen versions from Bela Lugosi to Buffy

Sarah Dobbs Jun 21, 2017

As news arrives that Sherlock's creators are working on a Dracula adaptation, here are 10 screen versions of Bram Stoker's character...

Dracula is one of the classic monster stories. It’s the quintessential vampire tale; most of our ideas about what a vampire is, what a vampire does, and what a vampire can be killed by come from Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel. And while elements of the story have been woven into countless other vampire-themed books, films, and TV shows, it’s Dracula that we keep coming back to, over and over. Sherlock creators Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss are in talks about reviving the character once again for a BBC miniseries, but before that arrives, let’s take a look back at ten other versions of the world’s most famous vampire…

See related Kevin Feige on Black Panther, female superhero movie Thor: Ragnarok - Thor's roommate won't be in it Nosferatu (1922)

Who plays Dracula? Max Schreck.

What’s the story? It’s a pretty faithful, if pared down, version of the Dracula story: a clerk is sent out to meet a mysterious client in a spooky castle, realises he’s a monster, and tries to flee, only for his own wife to fall victim to the vampire’s spell. It’s silent, black and white, and gorgeous.

What makes it special? What’s kind of amazing about this film is that it almost didn’t survive. The production didn’t have the approval of Bram Stoker’s estate, and despite changing a few details – the vampire here is known as Count Orlok, not Dracula, and the other names and locations have also been altered – it’s close enough that when the Stokers sued, a court ordered all copies of the film to be destroyed.

Luckily for us, one survived. It’s incredibly creepy, all weird angles and lurking shadows, and Schrek plays the vampire as a proper monster. There’s nothing seductive about him, he’s just terrifying. Even now. Especially now, maybe, now that we’re jaded and cynical about special effects and CGI. Because this film looks scarier than anything created on a computer, and it’s all real.

Dracula (1931)

Who plays Dracula? Bela Lugosi.

What’s the story? Based on a popular stage adaptation of Dracula, this is another mostly faithful adaptation, though the characters have been shuffled a bit. Here, it’s Renfield, not Jonathan, who goes out to meet Dracula in his castle in Transylvania. Jonathan and Lucy get shunted off to the side of the story, with Mina taking centre stage, while Dr Seward, head of the lunatic asylum, is recast as her father. Lugosi is a much sexier Count than Schreck, and the subtext about Mina’s sexual awakening is, er, pretty much text here.

What makes it special? Oh, everything. It’s beautiful to look at, for one thing. It’s got a bit of a sense of humour, though not enough to stop it from being insanely creepy. Lugosi makes the role completely his own; when people think of Count Dracula, this is the version most of them imagine. Interestingly, this version also does a lot more with Renfield’s story than the original novel, and Dwight Frye is fantastic in that role. Even if you think you’ve seen too many Dracula parodies to enjoy Lugosi’s rendition of the Count, this film is worth watching for Dwight Frye alone.

Dracula (1958)

Who plays Dracula? Christopher Lee.

What’s the story? It’s Dracula, but slightly wonky. It starts with Jonathan Harker setting off to visit Castle Dracula – but this time, he knows what he’s in for, and is planning to kill the Count. He fails, leaving Van Helsing to take up the hunt. Most of the characters have been shuffled around: Jonathan is engaged to Lucy, who’s Arthur’s sister, and Arthur is married to Mina. It’s not obvious why that reshuffle had to happen, because it doesn’t make a huge amount of difference to how things play out. It’s still Mina who has to fight to extricate herself from Dracula’s clutches in the end.

What makes it special? Dracula was one of the first Hammer Horror films, and it was massively successful. It spawned eight sequels, including The Brides of Dracula, Dracula Has Risen from the Grave, and Taste The Blood of Dracula, and it basically shaped the horror genre for a good couple of decades. But what’s special about it today is the cast. Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing are always good value, and here, as the evil Count and the scholarly vampire hunter determined to kill him off, they’re brilliant.

Count von Count, Sesame Street (1972)

Who plays Dracula? Originally Jerry Nelson, and now Matt Vogel.

What’s the story? Okay, this is kind of a cheat. Count von Count isn’t actually called Dracula, but he’s so clearly modelled on Bela Lugosi’s portrayal of the great vampire that I couldn’t just leave him out. The character appears to be based on the idea that vampires are obsessed with counting – folklore from all over the world has it that if a vampire encounters a pile of rice or other grains, they won’t be able to do anything until they’ve counted it all. The Count loves to, er, count.

What makes it special? The fact that Sesame Street included a vampire character is kind of amazing, and the fact that he speaks in a parody of Lugosi’s accent, and wears that cape, well, it’s just sort of brilliant. The earliest incarnations of the Count were a bit spooky, but apparently kids found his maniacal laughing and tendency to zap people who interfered with his counting a bit scary, so he was made cuter and goofier. He’s basically the most adorable incarnation of Dracula you’ll ever find.

Blacula (1972)

Who plays Dracula? Charles Macaulay.

What’s the story? This film is about one of Dracula’s protégés, rather than Dracula himself. After an African prince approaches Dracula for help dealing with the slave trade, he gets bitten and sealed in a coffin for centuries. Popping out in the 1970s, Mamuwalde – dubbed “Blacula” by the Count – sets about trying to win the heart of a woman he believes to be the reincarnation of his dead wife.

What makes it special? Isn’t the idea of a blaxploitation take on Dracula special enough for you? William H. Marshall plays the first ever black vampire in this movie, and since there haven’t been all that many since, that’s still pretty notable. The fashion is glorious, and the music is wonderful too. The plot is, well, kind of flimsy, and pretty slow, and it actually verges on being kind of boring, but there’s something pretty cool about it nonetheless.

Blood for Dracula (1974)

Who plays Dracula? Udo Kier.

What’s the story? A sickly Dracula is starving to death due to the lack of available virgins in Romania, so he travels to Italy in search of a bride. Unfortunately, the family of impoverished aristocrats he ends up staying with employs a rather rapey handyman, and there may not be any virgins left for him.

What makes it special? Produced by Andy Warhol, this is definitely one of the strangest takes on the Dracula story. Many of the established tropes are present – Dracula doesn’t have a reflection, and can’t stand garlic - but rather than being powerful and seductive, Kier’s Count is almost pitiable. He spends much of the film in a wheelchair, which is an oddly creepy image, and he’s kind of… whiny. It’s hard to know where your sympathies should lie, and it’s fun to see a mother actively throwing her daughters at Dracula rather than trying to save them from him. The accents are occasionally baffling (especially Joe Dallesandro’s Brooklyn drawl) but maybe that’s all part of the joke.

Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992)

Who plays Dracula? Gary Oldman.

What’s the story? Back in the fifteenth century, Dracula’s wife kills herself after being told her husband has been killed in battle. Knowing suicide is a sin, Dracula figures she’s damned, and turns against God himself, becoming a vampire. After skulking in his castle for centuries, he decides to move to London, where he meets Mina Harker – a woman who looks exactly like his dead wife. The rest of the Dracula story is intact, but with a side of overly dramatic tragic romance.

What makes it special? It’s one of the most faithful adaptations around, in terms of how much of the book it conveys to the screen. Characters are shown writing letters and diary entries, as per the book, and Lucy’s three suitors are all present and correct, which is rare.

Unfortunately, some of the performances are pretty terrible (Keanu Reeves is an easy target, but he’s truly awful here, and Cary Elwes is in full smirk mode). There are so many famous people crammed in that it gets distracting, and the set design is too stagey to be effective. But it gets points for keeping all the characters in their places.

Buffy vs Dracula’, Buffy the Vampire Slayer (2000)

Who plays Dracula? Rudolf Martin.

What’s the story? To kick off the fifth season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Buffy went up against the most famous vampire of all time. Yup, they actually wrote Dracula into an episode of Buffy. There’s no real messing with the character, apart from dropping him into modern day California, and he uses pretty much all of his tricks: he turns into a bat, he dissolves into mist, he uses mind control to turn Xander into a slavering minion, and he seduces Sunnydale’s women, including Buffy herself.

What makes it special? There’s something about crossovers that’s always oddly irresistible. Fitting the Scooby Gang into the Dracula story is fun because of the cognitive dissonance it causes: they’re all-American teenagers, and he’s a character from a gothic Victorian novel, so there’s no reason they should ever encounter one another, and the fallout is genuinely funny. (Spike’s indignation is a particular highlight.) There’s also a serious side to the story, as Dracula tells Buffy she’s a creature of darkness, but that’s something that really developed over the rest of the series. This episode is mostly just fun.

Dracula 2000 (2000)

Who plays Dracula? Gerard Butler.

What’s the story? Despite Van Helsing’s best efforts, someone has let Dracula out of his prison, and he’s determined to track down the one woman who might be able to stand up to him. (Who just happens to be Van Helsing’s daughter.) Bringing Van Helsing and Dracula into a modern day setting requires a bit of sleight of hand, but it just about works, and the film has an ace up its sleeve: an explanation for Dracula’s true identity that finally explains why he’s so averse to silver and crucifixes.

What makes it special? It kind of shouldn’t be, because it’s so silly. It’s got that self-aware, slightly camp late-90s horror thing going on, and it’s never actually scary. But it is a lot of fun, with some sharp dialogue (“I don’t drink… coffee”) and loads of geek-friendly faces popping up, including Jonny Lee Miller, Nathan Fillion, and Jeri Ryan.

Blade: Trinity (2004)

Who plays Dracula? Dominic Purcell

What’s the story? Dracula, or “Drake”, is an ancient vampire summoned by modern day vampires looking for an upgrade. Blade has been killing off too many of them, and they want to walk in daylight, which apparently Drake’s blood will let them do. Drake is a bit of a rubbish Dracula, as they go; he’s just a really old vampire, and none of the usual Dracula plot elements are present.

What makes it special? Let’s be clear about this, Blade Trinity is a pretty terrible film. It has two redeeming features, though: Ryan Reynolds and Parker Posey are fantastic, and every scene they have together is wonderful; and it includes a scene in which Drake wanders into a vampire-themed shop and terrorises the snarky goth assistants. Those things just about make it worth watching, but for Dracula super-fans, it hasn’t got much to offer. Purcell’s Dracula is apparently meant to be charismatic, but he just comes off dull and thuggish.

Other notable onscreen Draculas: Countess Dracula (Ingrid Pitt stars as Elizabeth Bathory, so not really Dracula at all, except in the title); Count Duckula (an 80s cartoon about a vampiric duck); Count Dracula (a low budget horror from 1979, directed by Jess Franco and starring Christopher Lee despite not being part of Lee’s Hammer Dracula franchise); Dracula: Dead And Loving It (Mel Brooks’s daft spoof); Dracula Ad 1972 (a reteaming of Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing that brings Dracula into the 70s); Dracula Sucks (a hardcore porn adaptation); and Dario Argento’s Dracula 3D (which isn’t out yet, and will almost certainly be terrible.)

This feature was originally posted in October 2013.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Phineas and Ferb co-creator: 'children are much more intelligent than people give them credit for'

Jeff 'Swampy' Marsh on 'the rantings of two middle-aged men who believed kids didn't get out and do things any more'

Us cartoon Phineas and Ferb made its debut on Disney Channel in early 2008, and has since gone on to be one of the channel's most popular series, attracting more than 289m viewers worldwide since that first broadcast.

One of its co-creators, Jeff 'Swampy' Marsh, gave a keynote at the Children's Media Conference in Sheffield today, explaining the creative workflow behind the show, and how it has evolved over time.

Marsh got into animation "pretty late in life" at the age of 28, with his first professional job drawing backgrounds for The Simpsons. Four seasons later, he moved on to the show Rocko's Modern Life, where he got his first chance to write and direct, and also met his Phineas and Ferb co-creator Dan Povenmire.

He went on to work on
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Phineas and Ferb co-creator: 'children are much more intelligent than people give them credit for'

Jeff 'Swampy' Marsh on 'the rantings of two middle-aged men who believed kids didn't get out and do things any more'

Us cartoon Phineas and Ferb made its debut on Disney Channel in early 2008, and has since gone on to be one of the channel's most popular series, attracting more than 289m viewers worldwide since that first broadcast.

One of its co-creators, Jeff 'Swampy' Marsh, gave a keynote at the Children's Media Conference in Sheffield today, explaining the creative workflow behind the show, and how it has evolved over time.

Marsh got into animation "pretty late in life" at the age of 28, with his first professional job drawing backgrounds for The Simpsons. Four seasons later, he moved on to the show Rocko's Modern Life, where he got his first chance to write and direct, and also met his Phineas and Ferb co-creator Dan Povenmire.

He went on to work on
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Should Danger Mouse get a reboot?

Crumbs, Dm! The animated secret agent is reportedly being lined up for a reboot. But will Danger Mouse and Penfold benefit from an update?

As great as it may have seemed at the time, the full repercussions of January's Citv Old Skool Weekend have only just started to sink in. First, after spending two days being bombarded with kids' shows from the past, it's now uncomfortably clear that that none of the programmes you liked as a kid – from Knightmare to Fraggle Rock to Wizadora – were actually that good. And now, on top of that, it turns out that the most-watched show of the entire weekend – and the most-watched show ever on the Citv channel, in fact – was Danger Mouse. Inevitably, this means that a reboot is in the offing.

This week Sander Schwartz, the president of FremantleMedia Kids & Family Entertainment, revealed to Broadcast that a Danger Mouse reboot was
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Danger Mouse, SuperTed, Count Duckula: Which kids shows should return?

Kids TV classic Danger Mouse could potentially be getting a reboot for the Twitter generation. Good grief Penfold!

The news has had the Digital Spy office chatting all day about our own favourite kids TV classics from the '80s and '90s from the silliness of Fun House and Bananaman to the action of Defenders of the Earth and Dungeons & Dragons.

From the japes of Count Duckula and Defenders of the Earth to the teen angst of Saved By The Bell and California Dreams, we've been talking wistfully about the days of vintage children's telly when '80s power ballad theme tunes, gunge tanks and Pat Sharp's mullet were all acceptable entertainment.

But we want to know, what were your all-time favourite kids TV classics? What show would you most like to get a reboot? We've picked out five suggestions below, let us know your own at the bottom of the page.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Danger Mouse, SuperTed, Count Duckula: What kids shows should return?

Kids TV classic Danger Mouse could potentially be getting a reboot for the Twitter generation. Good grief Penfold!

The news has had the Digital Spy office chatting all day about our own favourite kids TV classics from the '80s and '90s from the silliness of Fun House and Bananaman to the action of Defenders of the Earth and Dungeons & Dragons.

From the japes of Count Duckula and Defenders of the Earth to the teen angst of Saved By The Bell and California Dreams, we've been talking wistfully about the days of vintage children's telly when '80s power ballad theme tunes, gunge tanks and Pat Sharp's mullet were all acceptable entertainment.

But we want to know, what were your all-time favourite kids TV classics? What show would you most like to get a reboot? We've picked out five suggestions below, let us know your own at the bottom of the page.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Citv celebrates 30th birthday with ‘Old Skool’ weekend

  • ScreenTerrier
ITV’s children’s brand Citv celebrates its 30th birthday in 2013. To mark the occasion, ITV1 will air a documentary on 29th December 2012 charting the history of the brand, and the Citv channel will be holding an action packed ‘Old Skool’ weekend on 5th and 6th January 2013.

From 9:25am to 6pm on the 5th and 6th January 2013, Citv will be broadcasting a selection of its iconic shows including Fun House, Press Gang, Knightmare, The Raggy Dolls, Count Duckula, Art Attack and Children's Ward. Additional episodes will also be available to view and rent online at www.itv.com/itvplayer for an exclusive period giving viewers the chance to re-live their favourite childhood programmes.

Jamila Metran, Head of Programming, Citv said: “We are very proud of Citv’s heritage, and look forward to bringing back all the old favourites for this one-off, not to be missed event and show the
See full article at ScreenTerrier »

'Sooty Show', 'Fun House', 'Press Gang' return for Citv 30th birthday

'Sooty Show', 'Fun House', 'Press Gang' return for Citv 30th birthday
Citv is celebrating its 30th birthday by scheduling a weekend of retro kids TV classics from the '80s and '90s. The Old Skool Weekend, which will take place on January 5-6, will feature repeats of popular old favourites such as The Sooty Show, Knightmare, Fun House and Press Gang. Watch 'The Sooty Show' intro: ITV children's presenters from the last 30 years such as Ant and Dec, Holly Willoughby, Fearne Cotton, Christopher Biggins and Matthew Kelly will also be interviewed about their favourite memories and shows. The full schedule for the weekend is below: Saturday, January 5

09.25 Mike & Angelo

09.50 Super Gran

10.15 Wizadora

10.30 T-Bag Strikes Again Watch a clip of 'T-Bag Strikes Again': 10.50 Engie Benjy

11.05 The Raggy Dolls

11.15 Puddle Lane

11.35 Count Duckula

12.00 The Sooty (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »
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