6.8/10
634
13 user 5 critic

The Stone Boy (1984)

PG | | Drama | 4 April 1984 (USA)
A Midwestern farm family faces major emotional adjustment after a tragedy results in the death of an older brother.

Director:

Christopher Cain

Writer:

Gina Berriault (screenplay)
Reviews

Watch Now

From $3.99 (SD) on Prime Video

2 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

The Driver (1978)
Action | Crime | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A getaway driver becomes the latest assignment for a tenacious detective.

Director: Walter Hill
Stars: Ryan O'Neal, Bruce Dern, Isabelle Adjani
Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.1/10 X  

Set to the narration of a talking buzzard, Charlie moves to a new town with his family. He wants to be friends with the popular kids at his local park, but they all play football and he ... See full summary »

Director: Christopher Cain
Stars: Ron Landry, Christopher Hanks, Bruce Kimball
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

A man with a wife and two daughters learns that he has a son. It seems that a few years ago while visiting France, he had an accident and he had an affair with the doctor who treated him. ... See full summary »

Director: Dick Richards
Stars: Martin Sheen, Blythe Danner, Craig T. Nelson
Possession (1981)
Drama | Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

A woman starts exhibiting increasingly disturbing behavior after asking her husband for a divorce. Suspicions of infidelity soon give way to something much more sinister.

Director: Andrzej Zulawski
Stars: Isabelle Adjani, Sam Neill, Margit Carstensen
Severance (1988)
Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.3/10 X  

When a young girl becomes caught up in the dangerous and self-destructive world of drugs, her ex-pilot father struggles to save her.

Director: David Max Steinberg
Stars: Linda Christian-Jones, Rachel Greenstein, Martin Haber
Action | Adventure | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4/10 X  

George Trent, a British spy, has gone incommunicado in Ibiza. Appleton Porter (Donald Sutherland) is sent to find out what happened to Trent. Porter settles into a small hotel with several ... See full summary »

Director: Burt Kennedy
Stars: Donald Sutherland, Ned Beatty, Ruth Gordon
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Robert Duvall ... Joe Hillerman
Jason Presson ... Arnold Hillerman
Glenn Close ... Ruth Hillerman
Susan Rinell ... Nora Hillerman (as Susan Blackstone)
Dean Cain ... Eugene Hillerman
Frederic Forrest ... Andy Jansen
Cindy Fisher ... Amalie
Gail Youngs ... Lu Jansen
Kenneth Anderson Kenneth Anderson ... Sheriff #1
John L. Strandell John L. Strandell ... Sheriff #2
Tom Duncan Tom Duncan ... Sheriff McDuff
Wilford Brimley ... George Jansen
Danna Duffy Danna Duffy ... Margaret Mathews
Quentin Rhoades Quentin Rhoades ... Clint Mathews
Mark Melander Mark Melander ... Clancy Mathews
Edit

Storyline

A Midwestern farm family faces major emotional adjustment after a tragedy results in the death of an older brother.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In one fatal moment he stood alone. His silence so loud it was deafening.

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 April 1984 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Dečak od kamena See more »

Filming Locations:

Cascade, Montana, USA See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Robert Duvall and Frederic Forrest appeared in The Conversation (1974), Apocalypse Now (1979), Lonesome Dove (1989), and Falling Down (1993). See more »

Goofs

Camera shadow on the backs of fireworks spectators. See more »

Quotes

Eva Crescent Moon Lady: Where you bond for?
Arnold Hillerman: You never heard of it.
Eva Crescent Moon Lady: Well, Reno is a good place to leave.
Arnold Hillerman: The place where I'm going to is a good place to leave.
See more »

Alternate Versions

One ending to this movie had the boy reuniting with his father by quietly slipping up next to him at the county fair, another ending had the boy reunited with his parents when they found him distraught by the loud banging of fireworks at the county fair, reminding him of the death of his brother. See more »

Connections

Version of The Stone Boy (1960) See more »

Soundtracks

Baby, You're So Young
Written and Sung by Mayf Nutter
Courtesy of Mayf Nutter Music, BMI
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Great cast in an emotional film.
20 March 2008 | by TOMASBBloodhoundSee all my reviews

The Stone Boy is an almost forgotten drama from the 1980s. Considering how many famous or soon to be famous people are in the film, one wonders how it could have been so overlooked. This is a slow, moody, but touching account of a tragedy that befalls a farm family. The film is more or less an indictment of Midwestern stoic values and suppression of emotion. The film will not be for all tastes, but anyone who can appreciate real human drama should like it OK.

In the early moments of the film, we see two brothers head off in the early morning hours to pick some peas and maybe shoot a duck or two if they're lucky. While climbing through a barbed wire fence, the gun accidentally discharges and the younger boy fatally shoots his older brother. These boys have apparently never taken a hunter safety course. The way for two men to properly go through a fence like this with one gun would be as follows: First man climbs through. Second man then passes him the gun through the fence. The first man then sets the gun down and helps the other through the fence. At no time should either man have his hands on both the gun and the fence.

Anyway, once his brother is killed, 12-yr-old Arnold regresses into his own world. He does not even run for help after his brother is shot. He simply goes ahead and picks the peas and tells his family about the accident later. At no point during the funeral or inquest does Arnold seem to show any regret or sorrow at all. His family seems to shun him. Perhaps they are even angry at him for killing his brother. An ornery uncle played by Frederick Forrest is outwardly upset with Arnold, even though the older brother's death allows him to hit on the kid's girlfriend. Arnold's parents don't seem to understand how to deal with their son. They really don't even try to talk to him. About the only person he can communicate with is his grandfather who is played in typical grandfatherly skill by Wilford Brimley. After a while, Arnold even moves in with the old timer.

Nothing seems to get Arnold to open up until he takes a bizarre road trip to Reno Nevada to inexplicably look up his uncle's ex-wife. Once he meets her, he begins to emerge from his shell after apologizing to her for breaking up her marriage by starting all of the family's turmoil with the accident. From here on, the film becomes a quick study in reconciliation and reawakening.

The acting is hauntingly distant in most cases. Robert Duvall and Glenn Close make the perfect stoic farm parents. Forrest is good, but maybe trying too hard to channel Paul Newman's performance in Hud. The cinematography is exceptional, too. If you like moody pictures about common folk, this one may be for you. Some even may be advised to bring some tissues. 8 of 10 stars.

The Hound.


7 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 13 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed