6.7/10
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221 user 85 critic

Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984)

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1:14 | Trailer
Admiral Kirk and his bridge crew risk their careers stealing the decommissioned U.S.S. Enterprise to return to the restricted Genesis Planet to recover Spock's body.

Director:

Leonard Nimoy

Writers:

Gene Roddenberry (based on "Star Trek" created by), Harve Bennett
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Popularity
4,165 ( 257)
1 win & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
William Shatner ... Kirk
Leonard Nimoy ... Capt. Spock
DeForest Kelley ... McCoy
James Doohan ... Scotty
Walter Koenig ... Chekov
George Takei ... Sulu
Nichelle Nichols ... Uhura
Robin Curtis ... Saavik
Merritt Butrick ... David
Phil Morris ... Trainee Foster
Scott McGinnis ... Mr. Adventure
Robert Hooks ... Admiral Morrow
Carl Steven ... Spock - age 9
Vadia Potenza Vadia Potenza ... Spock - age 13
Stephen Manley Stephen Manley ... Spock - age 17
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Storyline

In the wake of Spock's ultimate deed of sacrifice, Admiral Kirk and the Enterprise crew return to Earth for some essential repairs to their ship. When they arrive at Spacedock, they are shocked to discover that the Enterprise is to be decommissioned. Even worse, Dr. McCoy begins acting strangely and Scotty has been reassigned to another ship. Kirk is forced to steal back the Enterprise and head across space to the Genesis Planet to save Spock and bring him to Vulcan. Unbeknownst to them, the Klingons are planning to steal the secrets of the Genesis Device for their own deadly purpose. Written by Colin Tinto <cst@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Kirstie Alley, who played Saavik in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), did not reprise her role as Saavik because she was afraid of being typecast. Leonard Nimoy had been looking for an actress to play Saavik after she passed. He meet Robin Curtis, who has just arrived in Los Angeles, and hired her the next day. See more »

Goofs

When Kirk and Kruge are fighting, a piece of the cliff breaks away and wiggles down the side of the cliff rather than falling like a rock. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[Spock's dying words, repeated from the previous film]
Captain Spock: Don't grieve, Admiral. It is logical. The needs of the many outweigh...
Kirk: ...the needs of the few.
Captain Spock: Or the one. I have been and always shall be your friend. Live long and prosper.
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Crazy Credits

Leonard Nimoy is credited as director in the opening credits, but is not included in the cast list. There is a long gap between the names of William Shatner and DeForest Kelley, which lasts for the length of time Nimoy's name would have been displayed. See more »

Alternate Versions

Some network broadcasts are noticeably truncated. In particular, the scene where Kruge destroys the female mercenary for looking at the Genesis information is deleted. The scene ends instead with the two characters expressing love for each other! The scene where McCoy refers to "that green-blooded son-of-a-bitch" is also censored. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Last Survivor: A Star Trek Fan Production (2018) See more »

Soundtracks

Tangerine
by Johnny Mercer & Victor Schertzinger
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User Reviews

 
better than you've heard
19 March 2004 | by dr_foremanSee all my reviews

I almost never agree with Trekkies! They usually pan "Star Trek III" and label it a disappointing follow-up to the classic "Wrath of Khan." But I just don't see anything wrong here. The Klingons are delightfully over-the-top villains, the effects and spaceship models are great (arguably the best in the series), and the theft of the Enterprise is a wonderful sequence loaded with humor and tension. DeForest Kelley gets some great material as the "possessed" McCoy, and Shatner's performance - slightly more understated than in the last film - is again rock solid.

So what's the problem? I suppose this movie has difficulties standing on its own; it relies heavily on knowledge of "Khan." But, such issues inevitably crop up when you're dealing with a long-running series of interconnected movies, and they don't matter much in terms of raw entertainment value. Some fans complain that nothing really happens in this film - it's just about getting Spock back and nothing else - but the death of David and the destruction of the Enterprise load it up with more than enough dramatic punch for me.

And, can you possibly imagine Picard stealing the Enterprise to go on a rescue mission? I can't. This movie's storyline captures exactly what makes the original crew so warm, funny, and rebellious...and so it's a good Trek movie, despite what the fans will tell you.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Klingon | Russian | French

Release Date:

1 June 1984 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Star Trek III: Return to Genesis See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$17,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$16,673,295, 3 June 1984

Gross USA:

$76,471,046

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$76,471,046
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby (35 mm prints)| 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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