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Super Space Fortress Macross (1984)

Chôjikû Yôsai Macross: Ai Oboeteimasuka (original title)
Not Rated | | Animation, Action, Adventure | 21 July 1984 (Japan)
In the next century, a reconfiguring ship (think "Transformer" with a pilot) called Macross carries fifty thousand refugees within its hold as it returns to Earth pursued by giant humanoid ... See full summary »

Writers:

Shôji Kawamori (story), Sukehiro Tomita (screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Mari Iijima ... Lynn Minmay (voice)
Arihiro Hase ... Hikaru Ichijyo (voice)
Mika Doi ... Misa Hayase (voice)
Michio Hazama ... Bruno J. Global (voice)
Noriko Ohara ... Claudia LaSalle (voice)
Akira Kamiya ... Roy Focker (voice)
Osamu Ichikawa Osamu Ichikawa ... Golg Boddole Zer (voice)
Eiji Kanie Eiji Kanie ... Vrlitwhai 7018 (voice)
Ryûnosuke Ôbayashi Ryûnosuke Ôbayashi ... Exsedol 4970 (voice) (as Ryûsuke Ôbayashi)
Hirotaka Suzuoki ... Lynn Kaihun (voice)
Shô Hayami Shô Hayami ... Maximillian Jenius (voice)
Katsumi Suzuki Katsumi Suzuki ... Hayao Kakizaki (voice)
Hiromi Tsuru ... Kim Kaviroff (voice)
Sanae Miyuki ... Shammy Milliome (voice) (as Miyuki Muroi)
Run Sasaki ... Vanessa Laird (voice)
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Storyline

In the next century, a reconfiguring ship (think "Transformer" with a pilot) called Macross carries fifty thousand refugees within its hold as it returns to Earth pursued by giant humanoid warriors. A young pilot in the military named Hikaru rescues his idol, the beautiful singer Lynn Minmay, from the giants as they break through the ship's hull during a concert-during which the giants are shocked to see females on a male vessel-and they are trapped for days in an aft hold of the ship. After their rescue, Hikaru and Minmay continue on good terms until a joyride in a fighter trainer gets Hikaru, his squadron leader, Minmay's brother, Minmay herself and the tough female operations controller captured by the giants, who grill them on how males and females can survive together without fighting. The giants' female counterparts arrive to wreak havoc on their male foes, and in the ensuing confusion Minmay and her brother are detained while the others make an escape that costs squadron leader... Written by Zach Adams <zqa9567@tam2000.tamu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Explore the outer limits of imagination where humans battle a race of giant bionoids.


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

21 July 1984 (Japan) See more »

Also Known As:

Super Space Fortress Macross See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Clash of the Bionoids English dub)

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Kawamori and Matsuzaki had originally designed an elaborate ending sequence for the film, which would have featured Minmay singing "Angel's Paints" while we caught glimpses of the other characters watching the concert. This sequence (and a storyboarded sequence featuring Max and Millia's wedding) were scrapped due to the budget running out. The concert sequence was later animated in Super Dimensional Fortress Macross: Flash Back 2012 (1987) and the concert sequence was finally appended to the end of Macross DYRL to complete the film as the creators had intended. See more »

Quotes

[Hikaru tries to convince Minmay to sing to defeat the Zentradi]
Lynn Minmay: You can't win a war by singing! Stay with me, if we're going to die anyway...
Hikaru Ichijo: It's not just for us. It's for everyone onboard Macross.
Lynn Minmay: That has nothing to do with us! Why aren't we the only two in the universe? I wish everyone would die except you and me!
[Hikaru slaps Minmay, as a panoply of war's destruction plays across the screen.]
Hikaru Ichijo: Sempai died. Kakizaki died. So many have died. They had plans for peace. You can still sing, can't...
[...]
See more »

Alternate Versions

The English dub, unlike most, was actually made at the behest of the Japanese distributors, who felt an interesting gimmick would be to release the movie in both Japanese and later in English. Uncredited Australian and Hong Kong actors were used. A Japanese laserdisc and DVD release in 1997 used the concert scenes from "Flashback 2012" as a replacement for the aborted ending concert sequence. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Super Robot Wars X-Omega (2015) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Stands Up To The Best, Even Today
11 August 2005 | by genrebustersSee all my reviews

Super Dimensional Fortress Macross: Do You Remember Love? Ah, what a name and what a movie. This is what classic Japanese Animation is all about. Just the name itself conjures up nostalgic memories of yesterday, running home from fourth grade to catch the latest episode of Robotech, to attending my first Anime convention and realizing the true power of the unedited series as well as this incredible film which retells the story. The music, the characters, the animation and the story are the very things that attracted me to Japanese animation in the first place. And still, even after all of these years, SDFM:DYRL not only holds up, but is still a force to be reckoned with.

This is due, in no small part, to the creative talent and storytelling capabilities of Shoji Kawamori. Although his filmography may be small, it is an example of quality over quantity. Kawamori's Macross series made giant transforming robots, singing pop-idol young starlets, heroic floppy haired boys, and melodramatic drama popular to thousands of fans across the globe. Who in their right mind never dreamed of someday flying a Valkyrie, or meeting a girl as spunky and hot as Lynn Minmay or as gorgeous and smart as Misa Hayase? Or who never wished that their hair were as cool as Max's blue locks or Hikaru's tangled mop? And who never wished for the experiences and friendships shared by the Defense Force as they battled the onslaught of the Zentradi forces? Without Kawamori, none of these questions would have ever even been possible. To me, this is like trying to imagine a childhood without Star Wars.

SDFM:DYRL is at it's core, a story of an alien invasion. The Zentradi, a race of aliens created for only war are hell-bent on tracking down a lost ship, the Macross, which is the key to the universal power of Protoculture. Protoculture is the universal matter from which all things were created and it gives life to those who have it. The Zentradi track down this lost ship, which has landed on Earth. The humans of Earth learn, to a somewhat limited degree, the power of the Macross, and are able to escape with a few hundred survivors to the outer reaches of space, thus setting in motion the constant game of cat and mouse between the Zentradi and the humans. Although this story is quite basic on the surface, what really set Macross apart from the other giant-invading-robot movies/series was the investment the audience had in the characters.

The animation itself is quite beautiful, although it may seem somewhat primitive by today's digital standards. It is, however, a great example of how Japanese animation differs from its Western counterparts. While Western animation, especially concerning studios such as Disney and Warner Bros., put more energy into creating smooth animated movement, the Japanese directors and artists have always been more interested in creating insanely detailed drawings. Some Japanese directors have claimed that Japanese animation is actually more of a mix between the detailed still drawings of manga and the fluidity of traditional Western animation, thus it is an art form in and of itself being neither comic book nor cartoon. Macross is a perfect example of this ideology. Although the animation may not be extremely fluid, what we are given are vastly detailed cityscapes, landscapes and space frontiers, as well as mechanical and character designs to die for.

And how can I possibly even mention the word Macross without at least a brief mention of the music? Kentaro Haneda, who created the original music, made sure that the score and songs were as captivating as the film itself, as well as making sure every note of every song fit perfectly with what was being shown on screen. After all, with music playing such an intricate roll in the entire Macross saga, the music really needed to be top notch – and it was.

SDFM:DYRL is a classic in every sense of the word. A movie that is just as good today as it was almost 20 years ago. Some films do not live up to the memories we have of them, and as we get older some films lose their power. SDFM:DYRL on the other hand, becomes a beacon of light to remind us of the reasons we fell in love with Japanese films in the first place.


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