5.9/10
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14 user 6 critic

Lassiter (1984)

A handsome jewel thief is arrested and in order to avoid prison, must break into the heavily guarded German Embassy to steal millions in gems.

Director:

Roger Young

Writer:

David Taylor

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tom Selleck ... Nick Lassiter
Jane Seymour ... Sara Wells
Lauren Hutton ... Kari Von Fursten
Bob Hoskins ... Inspector John Becker
Joe Regalbuto ... Peter Breeze
Ed Lauter ... Smoke
Warren Clarke ... Max Hofer
Edward Peel ... Sgt. Allyce
Paul Antrim Paul Antrim ... Askew
Christopher Malcolm ... Quaid
Barrie Houghton Barrie Houghton ... Eddie Lee
Peter Skellern Peter Skellern ... Pianist
Harry Towb ... Roger Boardman
Belinda Mayne Belinda Mayne ... Helen Boardman
William Morgan Sheppard ... Sweeny (as Morgan Sheppard)
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Storyline

Lassiter is a handsome jewel thief operating in London in the late 1930s. One day he is arrested and told that if he wishes to avoid prison, he must break into the heavily guarded German Embassy in London and steal millions in Gems. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The best things in life...are stolen See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The movie's opening title card states: "London June 1939". See more »

Quotes

Nick Lassiter: What happens if they catch me? You gonna bring on the cavalry?
Peter Breeze: Well... if they catch you in the embassy there's nothing we can do. That embassy is Germany, you might as well be in Berlin.
Nick Lassiter: That's comforting.
Peter Breeze: I'm sorry, Lassiter.
Nick Lassiter: Bullshit.
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Soundtracks

Let's Call The Whole Thing Off
Music by George Gershwin and lyrics by Ira Gershwin
Performed by Peter Skellern
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User Reviews

 
'The Best things in Life… are stolen'
23 February 2013 | by lost-in-limboSee all my reviews

Tom Selleck; best known for the 1980s cop TV show "Magnum P.I." and of course for his signature mo. But in the middle of that series he starred in a classy, old-fashion crime caper which sees him as jewel thief Nick Lassiter working in London in the 1930s, but one day he's arrested by Scotland Yard and blackmailed into stealing a large quantity of diamonds that's kept in the heavily guarded Germany embassy and is looked after by Hitler's cruel, but seductive secret agent Kari Von Fursten.

What made the film for me were the performances. Selleck is fitting in the main role as Lassiter; suave, but dogged. Who really stood out though were the ladies; Jane Seymour and especially Lauren Hutton. A hypnotic Seymour brought a sweet innocence to her role as Lassiter's dancer girlfriend, while the very seductively edgy Hutton was the opposite in her kinky femme fatal part. In support there were solid character actors; Joe Regalbuto, Bob Hoskins, Ed Lauter and a burly Warren Clarke as a German bodyguard. Watching how the breezy story unfolds is predictable (although clever in its schemes and throwbacks), but the engrossing script (Whom playing whom), character interactions and planned-out scenarios (numerous instances of caught between a rock and a hard place) are enjoyably digestible and humorously sharp. The direction is trim, but fashionably tailored with good locations and period details. Catchy theme song during the end credits too.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 February 1984 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Lassiter See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$5,027,583, 20 February 1984

Gross USA:

$17,513,452

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$17,513,452
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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