6.1/10
5,220
41 user 22 critic

Iceman (1984)

PG | | Drama, Sci-Fi | 13 April 1984 (USA)
A prehistoric Neanderthal man found frozen in ice is revived by an arctic exploration team, who then attempt to use him for their own scientific means.

Director:

Fred Schepisi

Writers:

Chip Proser (screenplay), John Drimmer (screenplay) | 1 more credit »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Timothy Hutton ... Dr. Stanley Shephard
Lindsay Crouse ... Dr. Diane Brady
John Lone ... Charlie
Josef Sommer ... Whitman
David Strathairn ... Dr. Singe
Philip Akin Philip Akin ... Dr. Vermeil
Danny Glover ... Loomis
Amelia Hall Amelia Hall ... Mabel
Richard Monette Richard Monette ... Hogan
James Tolkan ... Maynard
Stephen E. Miller ... Temp Doc
David Petersen ... Scatem Doc
Judith Berlin Judith Berlin ... E.K.G. Doc (as Judy Berlin)
Paul Batten Paul Batten ... Technician
Lovie Eli Lovie Eli ... Nurse
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Storyline

An anthropologist who is part of an arctic exploration team discovers the body of a prehistoric Neanderthal man who is subsequently resuscitated. The researcher must then decide what to do with the prehistoric man and he finds himself defending the man from those that want to dissect him in the name of science. Written by K. Rose <rcs@texas.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

An amazing unforgettable journey of humanity See more »

Genres:

Drama | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bruce Smeaton's score is not what was originally intended for the film. The score in the film is mainly needle drop tracks for most scenes. The score was recorded with the one hundred thirty piece Hollywood Symphony Orchestra, and was meant to have a fuller sound. The reason for this, was because Director Fred Schepisi, who was fired, and then brought back onto the project for post-production, tampered with the film after it was locked. He'd shifted around dialogue, scenes, and such. According to Smeaton, "He'd (Schepisi) gone in and made twenty-eight minor changes to the film, just as we (Smeaton, Music Editor Jim Henrikson, and Music Engineer Dan Wallin, along with the Hollywood Symphony) were preparing to go into Glen Glenn Sound with a one hundred thirty piece orchestra. The music wasn't fitting the scenes, for which they were intended. Fred (Schepisi) never showed up." Smeaton had to then cancel the sessions and edit down his music, from what they originally had been intended. Smeaton admits to having regretted working with Schepisi and their subsequent film, Roxanne (1987) starring Steve Martin would be their last project together. Schepisi would have the late Jerry Goldsmith as his composer of choice during the 1990s. See more »

Goofs

When "Charlie" awakens in the vivarium, he goes about life in general until he "catches" the water filter hose in the stream/pond. But as the scene continues, there is no way that he wouldn't notice the man-made construction of the glass enclosure or the fact that he cannot see the whole sky. Only when he roams hysterically around the vivarium does it become apparent. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Title Card: I, who was born to die, shall live. That the world of animals, and the world of men, may come together, I shall live. - Inuit Legend
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Crazy Credits

(opening quote) I, who was born to die Shall live. That the world of animals And the world of men May come together, I shall live. -- Inuit Legend See more »

Connections

Spoofed in Ice Woman (1993) See more »

Soundtracks

Heart of Gold
(uncredited)
by Neil Young
Performed by Timothy Hutton, accompanied by John Lone
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User Reviews

 
Endearing film but frustrating
11 February 2011 | by ljw1004See all my reviews

A prehistoric man from 20 to 40 thousand years ago is found frozen in a block of arctic ice. A research team find him, manage to bring him back to life, and try to figure out how to interact with him.

The performances feel genuine. The first dynamic is between the scientists who want to chop up his body and learn its biochemistry to better humankind vs those who want to study his habits and interact with him. The second dynamic is between the iceman and the ethnographer who gains his trust and friendship.

All the time I was watching it, I was angry at the ham-fisted incompetence of the researchers. Sure, I know, this is a movie and so the scriptwriters put in bumbling incompetence to push the plot forward. But just imagine if it a prehistoric man really were brought to life. It would be such a marvellous opportunity for interaction and learning, and even a halfway competent research team would make something better of it.

So, all the time, I was angry at the scriptwriters for cheating humanity and the iceman of this chance, and this didn't leave space to enjoy the film. 5/10.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 April 1984 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Iceman See more »

Filming Locations:

British Columbia, Canada See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,836,120, 15 April 1984

Gross USA:

$7,343,032

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$7,343,032
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Universal Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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