6.4/10
17,490
85 user 45 critic

Greystoke (1984)

Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes (original title)
A missing heir of respected Scottish family, raised in African jungles by animals, finally returns to his estate only to realize that difference between the two worlds is really significant.

Director:

Hugh Hudson

Writers:

Edgar Rice Burroughs (novel), Robert Towne (as P.H. Vazak) | 1 more credit »
Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 14 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ralph Richardson ... The Sixth Earl of Greystoke
Ian Holm ... Capitaine Phillippe D'Arnot
James Fox ... Lord Charles Esker
Christopher Lambert ... John Clayton / Tarzan, Lord of the Apes
Andie MacDowell ... Miss Jane Porter
Cheryl Campbell ... Lady Alice Clayton
Ian Charleson ... Jeffson Brown
Nigel Davenport ... Major Jack Downing
Nicholas Farrell ... Sir Hugh Belcher
Paul Geoffrey ... Lord John 'Jack' Clayton
Richard Griffiths ... Captain Billings
Hilton McRae Hilton McRae ... Willy
David Suchet ... Buller
Ravinder Ravinder ... Dean
John Wells John Wells ... Sir Evelyn Blount
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Storyline

A shipping disaster in the nineteenth century has stranded a man and woman in the wilds of Africa. The lady is pregnant, and gives birth to a son in their tree house. The mother dies soon afterwards. An ape enters the house and kills the father, and a female ape takes the tiny boy as a replacement for her own dead infant, and raises him as her son. Twenty years later, Captaine Phillippe D'Arnot discovers the man who thinks he is an ape. Evidence in the tree house leads him to believe that he is the direct descendant of the Earl of Greystoke, and thus takes it upon himself to return the man to civilization. Written by Murray Chapman <muzzle@cs.uq.oz.au>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In 1886, following a shipwreck off the west coast of Africa, an infant child became part of a family of apes who raised and protected him. As he grew, he learned the laws of the Jungle and eventually claimed the title, Lord of the Apes. Yet, years later, when he was returned to civilization, he would remain uncertain as to which laws he should obey . . . Those of man . . . Or those of the jungle. Now the director of 'Chariots of Fire', captures this epic adventure of a man caught between two different worlds. See more »

Genres:

Adventure | Drama

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first theatrical movie to be shot in the Super 35 format, then called Super Techniscope. See more »

Goofs

The cognitive and speech centers of the brain shut down if they are not stimulated. After a certain age, Tarzan wouldn't have been able to say more than a few words, let alone learn two entire languages. See more »

Quotes

Sir Evelyn Blount: Although the circumstances indicate that he is your grandson, we cant prove it. Of course, we, erm, might be able to do so if we could do some tests.
Sixth Earl of Greystoke: [Looking out the window] He's here!
[turns to Sir Evelyn]
Sixth Earl of Greystoke: If he's a Greystoke, I'll know him at a glance!
See more »

Alternate Versions

In a 2016 Hollywood Reporter article that interviewed director Hugh Hudson about his work on "Greystoke" ("The Secrets Behind That Other Tarzan Movie - The One That Earned a Dog a Screenwriting Oscar Nomination," by Stephen Galloway, July 01, 2016), Hudson is quoted saying, "What was complicated was to bring the film down to two hours and 20 minutes. We had an original cut of three hours, and it was at its best at two hours and 40 minutes, where you had a little bit longer [with Tarzan] growing up in the jungle and it was a bit more violent. The world of an ape is a violent world. And the studio was very nervous about that." http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/features/greystoke-inside-story-1984-tarzan-908081 Unfortunately, there are no known intact copies of the director's favored two hour, 40 minute cut anywhere to be found. See more »

Connections

Referenced in What's Up Doc?: Episode #2.4 (1993) See more »

Soundtracks

The Day Thou Gavest, Lord, Is Ended
(uncredited)
Written by John Ellerton
Music by Clement C. Scholefield
See more »

User Reviews

 
not the Tarzan you think of......
8 March 2003 | by dbdumonteilSee all my reviews

SPOILERS Edgar Rice Burroughs's famous character was adapted thousand of times for the screen til one's thirst is quenched, notably during the thirties and the forties by Hollywood. Its productors made Tarzan one of the most successful cinema characters. Several years later, Hugh Hudson decided to make a more ambitious version of the monkey-man and it's a more natural, more wild and more down-to-earth Tarzan that he gives away here. Hudson skilfully avoids the clichés that you usually grant to Tarzan such as his famous scream or his friendly pet, Cheetah. Not only, are we far from the designed and invented character made by Hollwood but we are also far from the film set used to make his stories. The movie was partly made in Africa (more precisely in Cameroon). The movie introduces two obvious parts: the first one which takes place in the jungle where Tarzan lives among his adoptive friends, the apes and considers himself as their lord. But he ignores his real origins. The second one in England where Tarzan discovers the English society. Ian Holm epitomizes the link between the two parts and Hudson avoids all that could make the movie falls into the ridiculous thanks to a clever screenplay. Indeed, Holm teaches Lambert basic rules of manners so as to behave correctly in the English society and the result works. Moreover, in the second part, no-one ever laughs at Tarzan and he's even really appreciated. As far as the end is concerned well it's a both bitter and happy end. Happy because Tarzan comes back to the jungle and meets again his adoptive close relatives. But bitter too, because this homecoming means that the Greystoke line won't be ensured and is condemned to disappear... Christophe Lambert finds here, his first (and last?) great role. Sadly, he'll never equal the achievement of his performance in this movie and he'll play in poor and insipide action movies. Nevertheless, as I said previously, a clever screenplay, a performance of a rare quality, some impressive natural sceneries (both the jungle and the English country and we get a gorgeous movie. It's also an excellent rereading from a popular novel. So why is it only rated barely (6/10)?


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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

30 March 1984 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Greystoke: The 7th Earl Lord John Clayton, Tarzan of the Apes See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,517,732, 1 April 1984

Gross USA:

$45,858,563

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$45,858,563
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (extended) | (Blu-ray)

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)| Dolby Stereo (35 mm prints)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

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