A programmer at a TV station that specializes in adult entertainment searches for the producers of a dangerous and bizarre broadcast.

Director:

David Cronenberg
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3,596 ( 367)
3 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
James Woods ... Max Renn
Sonja Smits ... Bianca O'Blivion
Debbie Harry ... Nicki Brand (as Deborah Harry)
Peter Dvorsky ... Harlan
Leslie Carlson ... Barry Convex (as Les Carlson)
Jack Creley ... Brian O'Blivion
Lynne Gorman ... Masha
Julie Khaner ... Bridey
Reiner Schwarz Reiner Schwarz ... Moses
David Bolt David Bolt ... Raphael
Lally Cadeau ... Rena King
Henry Gomez Henry Gomez ... Brolley
Harvey Chao Harvey Chao ... Japanese Salesman
David Tsubouchi David Tsubouchi ... Japanese Salesman
Kay Hawtrey ... Matron
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Storyline

Max Renn is the President of Channel 83 Civic-TV, a small television station on the UHF dial. He defends his programming of largely X-rated shows - which depict graphic sex and extreme violence - as a pure matter of economic survival as a small station. Behind closed doors in specific company, he would admit that he enjoys such programming, but as President will stay away from associated activities that may be dangerous for him in its purchase. His current girlfriend, radio personality Nicki Brand, who he met on a television talk show, is sexually aroused by light mutilation on her person, that despite or because her radio show is like an open air crisis hotline. On that same talk show, the other guest via video feed was Professor Brian O'Blivion - solely his stage name - who believes that television and video broadcasts will one day overtake the world as reality, which may make Max's programming in combination more dangerous. In Max's search for the next big thing in like programming... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

First it controls your mind...then it destroys your body See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Among the scenes that were scripted but deleted was one where Max Renn's TV rises up out of his bathtub, while showing an image. The crew had researched how to do this - there had been talk of having the actor IN the tub - and had come up with several solutions. One involved filling the tub with a clear fluid that was non conductive, but that would have cost $25 a quart. The crew eventually decided to take a real TV and simply cover its insides with layers of waterproofing insulation. It worked - they dunked the TV into a swimming pool and found, to their astonishment, that TVs float due to the ultra-high vacuum inside the picture tube. The scene was axed just before it was to be filmed. See more »

Goofs

when James woods and Debbie harry are making love for the first time there is a towel/bed sheet that appears and disappears...when looking from James side, u can see a light blue material covering her. when looking from Debbie's side, she has nothing on top. it goes from her-nothing, to him-something, back to her, then back to him... See more »

Quotes

Max Renn: Death to Videodrome! Long live the new flesh!
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Crazy Credits

The VIDEODROME title experiences a TV white noise distortion. See more »

Alternate Versions

The TV version first released to syndicated television is a significantly different edit with extra/additional material as follows: -A very different and extended introduction with longer opening titles presented over red themed paintings. -A longer version of Max's business meeting with the Japanese salesmen, including a reminiscence about a girl in a Hong Kong hotel, a sinister foreshadowing of the disappearing Videodrome performers. -Extended Sales Meeting at Civic TV. -A very brief additional line of dialogue in Harlan's lab. -An extension of the scene with Max and Nicki watching Videodrome. -Masha comments how Max looks tired and exhausted but makes her sales pitch. -Max takes a longer walk down Skid Row, and gets offered two meal choices during an extended scene inside the Cathode Ray Mission. -An extended version of Brian's monologue in which he comments, "You've got a nice little addiction going." -Nicki calls Max and explains that she was behind his first major hallucination, and Brian makes a return appearance telling Max to take advantage of his position. -Nicki picks up Max in a limo, and notes how much she likes his current incarnation, including his "sick and wonderful" hallucinations. -Barry Convex offers a greatly expanded backstory about the optical accumulator as a military device. -Max walks down the street and see a very different version of himself in a store window. -"It's Always Painful to change the program". -An alternate, shortened version of Barry Conex's assassination, made "safe" for US TV. -Max nervously sees a news report about the shootings on TV and encounters a mentally disturbed homeless man. -An extended version of Max's solo excursion deeper into the heart of the city and his own psyche, revealing more of the boat interior. -TV Epilogue - Pivotal lines of dialogue from the main characters are reiterated over the same paintings seen over the opening titles. (All the above are available on the 2015 Arrow Video UK Blu-ray release). See more »

Connections

Referenced in Wild Palms (1993) See more »

User Reviews

 
"Videodrome" - Cronenberg takes on the media
22 September 2005 | by dee.reidSee all my reviews

It takes the slightest peeks at his career to figure out David Cronenberg ("The Fly," "Dead Ringers," "Naked Lunch," "The Dead Zone," the upcoming "A History of Violence") is a director who is not to be toyed with. I forgot to add in his 1983 horror movie "Videodrome," and there is a reason for that, which I'll talk about later. His works provoke intelligent thought, and terrify those who can't comprehend it. His films stimulate, offend, and move those who care to watch them with an open mind.

Allow me to (try) explain. I won't bother to go into detail about the plot. A sleazy, lowlife TV producer named Max Renn (James Woods) rapidly becomes obsessed with an unusual television signal, which in turn begins to warp his perceptions of reality. Get it? Nah, of course you don't. You're not going to let a one-sentence plot description and, if you own the Criterion Collection DVD, the three essays included deter you from watching it, are you?

You're also not going to let scenes of grisly torture, unspeakable violence, murder, "flesh guns," human VCRs, exploding cancer-deaths (poor Leslie Carlson as Barry Convex), pulsating video cassettes, Deborah Harry in S&M and morphing televisions turn you away, are you? What's more, you're not going to let Woods's effectively "wooden" performance here (his sticking his face into a "living" television) turn you away either?

I won't even try to pretend I understood what was going through Cronenberg's mind when he wrote and directed this picture. I also won't pretend I understood the essays included with the DVD (and I don't think the writers did either). It's warped, it's perverted, it's depraved, and it's insanely intriguing and fascinating. The masses are frightened by "Videodrome" and with good reason. "Videodrome" is Cronenberg's dastardly take on mass-media consumption during a time when television was afraid... afraid to be real. Media violence had not yet become a major issue in America and hypocritical politicians weren't condemning it. But keep in mind this film was made in '83, years before the mind-blowing reality-morphing of "The Matrix" (1999).

There's a little more that I think I can get away with in describing the plot, and Renn eventually traces the signal to Pittsburgh, and is introduced to the station's enigmatic programmer Brian O'Blivion (Jack Creley) and his daughter Bianca (Sonja Smits). He learns of the bizarre nature surrounding Videodrome, and the fate of those of who watch it. As he becomes more and more obsessed, he finds it nearly impossible to turn it off, or turn away. Then those mutations and hallucinations Cronenberg is famous for start happening and when that does, things become nasty and the queasy may want to keep a finger on the fast-forward button. It's no secret Cronenberg loves torturing his protagonists and here, the "new flesh" wants to live long and Woods has the nice warm body perfect for it - he becomes a literal media assassin with a vaginal slit in his stomach that doubles as a programmable VCR and also has a handgun fused to his wrist - he's a virtual slave to Videodrome.

Lastly, the eerie, driving score by Howard Shore swells up during the film's most intense and surreal moments, the most lovely being Woods's lovemaking with his television. I always watch Cronenberg films at least partially for Shore's music. Now I know why Cronenberg selects him for his soundtracks.

"Videodrome," I think, has a lot more relevance today than it did 22 years ago. It's more visceral than gross, is quite brilliant, and doesn't spare us graphic violence and gore. It's alive, it's "Videodrome."

8/10


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Canada | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 February 1983 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Videodrome See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$5,952,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,194,175, 6 February 1983

Gross USA:

$2,120,439

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,120,439
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (uncut)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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