2.6/10
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Oasis of the Zombies (1982)

La tumba de los muertos vivientes (original title)
Unrated | | Horror | 21 April 1982 (France)
An expedition searching for treasure supposedly buried by the German army in the African desert during WW II comes up against an army of Nazi zombies guarding the fortune.

Director:

Jesús Franco (as A.M. Frank)

Writers:

Jesús Franco (screenplay) (as A.L. Mariaux), Ramón Llidó (story) (as Ramón Llido) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Manuel Gélin Manuel Gélin ... Robert Blabert
Eduardo Fajardo ... Colonel Kurt Meitzell
France Lomay ... Erika (as France Jordan)
Jeff Montgomery Jeff Montgomery ... Ben
Lina Romay ... Kurt's Wife
Myriam Landson Myriam Landson ... Kurt's Wife
Antonio Mayans ... Sheik Mohamed Al-Kafir
Javier Maiza Javier Maiza ... Captain Blabert
Eric Viellard ... Ronald (as Eric Saint-Just)
Caroline Audret Caroline Audret ... Sylvie
Albino Graziani Albino Graziani ... Prof. Deniken
Miguel Ángel Aristu Miguel Ángel Aristu ... Ahmed (as Miguel Aristu)
Henri Lambert Henri Lambert ... Kurt (as Henry Lambert)
Doris Regina Doris Regina ... Aisha
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jesús Franco ... Zombie
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Storyline

In the WWII, a platoon of German soldiers is attacked by the Allies in an oasis and only the British Commander survives. The Sheik and his daughter Aisha rescue him in the desert and bring him to their house, where he recovers. Years later, the survivor tells to the mercenary Kurt that the German troop was transporting a shipment of 6 million-dollar in gold and he informs the location of the treasure. However Kurt kills him and organizes an expedition to find the treasure. Meanwhile the student Robert Blabber reads notes of his father and discovers that there is a treasure hidden in the desert. Robert joins his friends and they travel to the desert to seek the gold. However, when they reach the location, they are attacked by an army of German living dead. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Ultimate Horror Lies Within the Wasteland See more »

Genres:

Horror

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

There is a French language version and a Spanish language version. The only difference is that the nazi doctor and his wife are played by different actors. See more »

Quotes

Girl victim 1: Look at the size of them. Do you suppose they're Redwoods?
Girl victim 2: They're date trees. Come on.
See more »

Alternate Versions

The film exist in two versions. The more common French version, which is the one released in the USA by Wizard Video on VHS, Image Entertainment on DVD, and Redemption on Blu-ray. And a more rare Spanish version. In total, there's about 20 minutes of exclusive footage in the Spanish version of the film, which features a partially different cast from the French version. For example, Lina Romay appears in the Spanish cut of the film; she doesn't appear in the French/English version. The gore scenes are also much more effective in the Spanish version of the film. A list of differences follows: General notes about "French version" vs. original "Spanish version" (this movie was made in two completely different versions simultaneously, featuring a French and Spanish cast, respectively): -"Spanish version" is approx. 2:32 min longer. The soundtrack on the Spanish version (credited to Pablo Villa) is completely different and much more effective. It is louder, and uses eerie organ music and "moans" instead of the bland electronic score on the "French version". -There are 4 sequences which have been "re-filmed" for the "Spanish version", basically using the same story outline, but different actors (Lina Romay, Eduardo Fajardo, etc.). They are all longer (and better) than their English/French counterparts - totaling 21m 50s compared to 16m 08s (an additional 5m 42s overall). 1) The first is immediately after the opening credits and shows Lina Romay waiting outside the house in a jeep whilst Eduardo Fajardo tries to extract information about the location of the oasis from Robert's father before killing him. (Spanish = 6m 38s, English = 4m 04s). 2) The second is after about 30m and shows the arrival of the search party at the oasis. They set up camp and attacked at night by the zombies. Lina Romay is graphically killed and her intestines removed. Eduardo Fajardo escapes although he is bitten. The English/French version is nowhere near as graphic (a few brief shots of the zombies are the same in bother versions). (Spanish = 12m 07s, English = 9m 28s). 3) The third is after about 45m and is just a brief sequence in which Eduardo Fajardo wakes up in the jeep and walks off. In the English/French version the man wakes up in bed before getting up. (Spanish = 23s, English = 16s). 4) The fourth is shortly after the above sequence and shows Eduardo Fajardo laughing maniacally as he starts to turn into a zombie from the bite on his neck. He eventually falls conveniently onto a bed of straw before being burnt. There are several cut-away shots of the students watching this from the English/French version. (Spanish = 2m 42s, English = 2m 20s). -After just over 60m there is a 3m 17s sequence of a couple of the students making love in their tent in the oasis (Inga and friend). This has been edited out of the Spanish print entirely. There are 2 further brief sequences not in the Spanish version: 10s after 75m - the girl student (Inga) carrying a petrol can being grabbed by the ankles by a zombie emerging from the sand, and 7s after 76m in which the zombies surround her and bite her leg. -One sequence lasting 46s of a series of shots of the zombies approaching, close-ups of worms on their faces, and shots of the oasis, is in a different place in the Spanish version (after 79m instead of 74m). -Finally after 81m there is one extra shot lasting 12s in the Spanish version showing the zombies disappearing into thin air in front of the oasis. -Of course the opening credits are completely different on both versions, although they last the same time - 1m 10s. The Spanish ones are in red lettering and play over a close-up of a zombie's face, whilst the English/French ones are in white lettering over a shot of the town. The Spanish print ends with 15s of additional credits after "Fin" which credit Jesus Franco as "montage" and Lina Romay as "ayte. de montage". -There is also more narrative voice-over during the war flashback sequence in the Spanish version. -To summarize then, the Spanish version has 22m 02s of footage not in the English/French version, but is missing 3m 34s of original footage and 16m 08s of alternate footage, giving a total difference of 2m 20s + 15s at end - 3s minor jumps = 2m 32s. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Ban the Sadist Videos! Part 2 (2006) See more »

User Reviews

Nazi zombies don't share.
28 September 2008 | by lost-in-limboSee all my reviews

With the legendary stinker reputation that this Jess Franco fable bestows (together with Jean Rollin's 'Zombie Lake'), I just could help myself to see what all the fuss was about. To tell the truth I was expecting something much, much worse when I got to the end of it, while viewable (think along the lines of a crash car taking place and you simply having trouble taking your eyes off it) I still couldn't deny just how uninvolved, flat and dull it was despite being compelled.

This leery zero-budget schlock never captures the premise's promising idea (where it has Nazi zombies protecting the gold from anyone who enters the oasis in the African desert) and doesn't go anywhere we haven't already been before. The lack of money for the production wouldn't have helped, but the execution is clunky and tame on all fronts for something that needed to be more risqué (no gore or nudity). A repetitively slow-going mess with incoherent story-telling and woodenly wordy script is what comes about. It's hard to get excited seeing the same lingering zooms, ponderous actions and having to listen to Daniel White's lousy score of cringe-induced skews being dragged out.

The ultra-cheap FX work for the threatening zombies (who seem to like to croak and shuffle) look like there done up in scrappy papier-mâché, but it has a decaying quality to it that's effective. Murky, washed out photography and lack of lighting doesn't make good use of the exotically bone-dry locations or helping to figure out just when it's night or day. Atmosphere is non-existent, but there's one decent creepy image Franco pulls off involving zombie silhouettes' moving down the dunes with the sun setting (or was it rising) in the backdrop and an well-organised explosive war set-piece during the sequence we're learning about the history of the Oasis and it's dead protectors. Acting is poor (but there are some stunning women about), and the character's they play (mainly the college kids) are plain stupid.

A doggedly uneventful zombie film that just manages to hold a spell over you. I don't know how though?


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Details

Country:

France | Spain

Language:

French | Spanish

Release Date:

21 April 1982 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Oasis of the Zombies See more »

Filming Locations:

Canary Islands, Spain

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See full technical specs »

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