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Trading Places (1983) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Cameo (7)  | Director Cameo (1)  | Director Trademark (5)  | Spoilers (2)
(at around 1h 50 mins) Don Ameche's strong religious convictions made him uncomfortable with swearing. This proved to be a problem for the scene at the end of the movie, where he had to shout out "Fuck him!" to a group of Wall Street executives. When he did act out the scene, it had to be done in one take, because Ameche refused to do a second one.
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Ralph Bellamy (Randolph) and Don Ameche (Mortimer) make cameo appearances in Coming to America (1988); the two are homeless and Prince Akeem (Eddie Murphy) gives them a large amount of money to get them back off the streets.
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In 2010, as part of the Wall Street Transparency and Accountability Act, which was to regulate financial markets, a rule was included which barred anyone from using secret inside information to corner markets, similar to what the Duke brothers tried to do in the movie. Since the movie inspired this rule, it has since become known as the Eddie Murphy Rule.
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Eddie Murphy later admitted that on the floor of the commodities exchange in the final scene, he only followed the script; he had no idea what was going on, as he found commodities trading incredibly confusing.
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The film was conceived as a vehicle for Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor. When Pryor dropped out and Eddie Murphy came on board, Murphy tried to get Wilder replaced, because he didn't want people to think he was just trying to be another Pryor.
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Several funny moments in the film came about by accident. The scene where Mortimer Duke (Don Ameche) is trying to catch the money clip, and having trouble, wasn't supposed to happen that way, but both kept going with it, and not breaking character, so it was kept in the movie. Ophelia's "Swedish" disguise came about because Jamie Lee Curtis couldn't do the correct Austrian accent.
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This was Ralph Bellamy's ninety-ninth film, and Don Ameche's forty-ninth. This was Eddie Murphy's second film, and he joked: "Between the three of us, we've made one hundred fifty movies!"
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Every year since 1997, Italian channel "Italia 1" broadcasts the movie in Christmas Eve nightfall. It regularly gets more than 10% of share.
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The Westin Hotel in Philadelphia has a restaurant named Winthorpe & Valentine, after two of the main characters in this movie.
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According to John Landis, Jamie Lee Curtis was a hard sell to "Paramount," because she had only done horror films and wasn't known for comedy.
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The scheme "buy low, sell high" is easy enough to understand, but what is not explained is what is being bought and sold: it is not orange juice itself, but so called "futures" in orange juice.

In the commodity trade, "future contracts" is an agreement to buy or sell a commodity at a fixed price, at a certain date in the future, no matter what the market price is on that day. For example: if you have a contract to buy, and the market price has risen above the value of that future, you can purchase the commodity for the cheaper price set in the contract, and then sell it again at the higher market price. This is an instant profit, and this is what the Dukes are hoping for.

The Dukes instruct their trader to secure futures to buy orange juice. They think this is a sure bet, because they have a report that says the orange crop will be bad. With a bad orange crop the market price of orange juice will go up. So later they can buy juice at the cheap price set in the futures contract, and immediately sell at the higher market price. Everyone else sees the Dukes do this, and joins in. when everyone is buying and few are selling, the price of futures go up. So now plenty of people have obliged themselves to buy orange juice at a high price, later on.

Winthorpe's shout - that sets off the frenzy - is "SELL 200 April at 142". This means: "I will sell orange juice to you in April, for 142 cents per pound". The reason everyone is so excited is that they think in April, the price will be much higher than 142 cents per pound. This sudden change - with someone selling instead of buying - causes the price to start dropping. The buyers are still happy, because they expect the prices to be high in April.

Then comes the reveal: the orange crop is fine, hence the orange juice prices will NOT be high in the upcoming year. With that the price of orange juice will be low in April.

Now everyone that has obliged themselves to buy from others risk being stuck with orange juice they have paid a lot for. And since orange juice spoils, they MUST find someone that promises to buy it, or the loss is complete. The frenzy to sell causes the price to plummet even faster. Winthorpe and Valentine only need to wait a bit, and then they reverse course, now promising to buy orange juice from others, at a lower price. This is the orange juice they will sell to others in April, which they obliged themselves to do earlier.

In the end, Winthorpe and Valentine are left with contracts that obliges them to buy orange juice at a low price. But they also have the obligation of others to buy orange juice from them at a high price, giving them a very good profit on each of their contracts.

The Dukes of course are left with the opposite - because they bought high, and were then forced to sell low - which bankrupts them. The reason this happens immediately is because they are getting a "margin call" at the end of the day's trading. When you are trading in futures, you must have a "margin" available which is a percentage of the value of the future contracts. They do not have that much money available. Winthorpe and Valentine are fine, because they can point to their guaranteed-to-be-profitable futures and get a loan for the margin.

The reason Ophelia and Coleman are pitching in money is because when obtaining a future contract, you need to pay a small percentage of the value of the contract to the one you are striking the deal with.
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The story about the Dukes' cornering of the orange juice market was probably inspired by the "Silver Thursday" market crash of March 27, 1980, when the Hunt brothers of Texas tried to corner the silver market and subsequently failed to meet a one hundred million dollar margin call.
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Ralph Bellamy and Don Ameche "cheerfully admitted" they were unfamiliar with Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd's work. The two also said that Murphy and Aykroyd acknowledged that they were unfamiliar with Bellamy and Ameche.
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In releasing his financial records for 2012, Al Franken revealed he still gets royalties for his appearance as the baggage handler.
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(at around 1h 8 mins) In the scene with Valentine in the restaurant and Winthorpe standing outside in the rain, Valentine is asked for his opinion about wheat. At that moment the entire room stops speaking and leans in to hear his advice. This is a reference to a series of 1980s commercials for the brokerage firm, E.F. Hutton ("When E.F. Hutton talks, people listen.").
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John Landis directed Eddie Murphy in "Trading Places," as well as Beverly Hills Cop III (1994) and Coming to America (1988). The two were close friends as a result of all of this; though Landis resented that Murphy did not support him while he was still embroiled in the Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983) movie manslaughter case against him. Landis wanted Murphy to testify as a character witness on his behalf; or at least show up in trial as a show of support; but he refused. Murphy said the following about the conflict with Landis in a recent Playboy interview: "As it turned out, John always resented that I hadn't gone to his "Twilight Zone" trial. I never knew that; I thought we were cool. But he'd been harboring it for a year. Every now and then, he would make little remarks, like, 'You didn't help me out; you don't realize how close I was to going to jail.' I never paid any mind." Murphy goes on to subtly indict Landis in the accident; or at least assign him some of the blame, in the interview: "I don't want to say who was guilty or who was innocent. But if you're directing a movie and two kids get their heads chopped off at twelve o'clock at night when there ain't supposed to be kids working, and you said, 'Action!' then you have some sort of responsibility. So my principles wouldn't let me go down there and sit in court. That's just the way I am."
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Randolph Duke (Ralph Bellamy) and Mortimer Duke (Don Ameche) always wear matching suits and tie patterns, only Randolph wears a bow tie, and Mortimer a necktie.
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Winthorpe and Valentine conduct what's known as "short selling", selling stock (or commodities) that one doesn't own, and then repurchasing the security at a lower price. It's the same principle as "buy low, sell high", just with the actions performed in reverse order. This is available to most clients, in the sense that they borrow the security from the holdings of their brokerage houses. It doesn't seem like Winthorpe and Valentine have a house from which to borrow their F.C.O.J. contracts, but Winthorpe appears to have had the guts to short sell on the fly, knowing the consequences of a mistake. Winthorpe was trading on a cash basis, using cash collateral, which is why Coleman and Ophelia gave the two traders all their cash in the train station.
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The World Trade Center's commodity exchange, Comex, was used for the trading scenes, and real traders performed alongside professional extras. As reported in studio production notes, the shoot at Comex was initially planned for a weekday, but the appearance of Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy on the set disrupted business activities, and six billion dollars of trading was halted. The shoot was rescheduled for a weekend.
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Was filmed immediately after the Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983) accident, when Vic Morrow and two child actors were killed when a helicopter crashed during production. John Landis was later tried and acquitted of manslaughter, the first time in history that a Hollywood director was charged for a death which had occurred on-set.
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Prior to this film, John Landis didn't know who Eddie Murphy was. "48 Hrs. (1982) hadn't come out yet, but they'd previewed it, and Eddie Murphy had previewed very well, and they thought, 'Ah this kid's going to be a star,'" Landis recalled of his discussions with "Paramount Pictures." "So they said, 'What do you think about Eddie Murphy playing the Billy Ray Valentine part?', and I of course said, 'Who's Eddie Murphy?'" It is extremely obvious that Landis was not a viewer of Saturday Night Live (1975), even though this film employed four of the cast members and that his other films featured other SNL veterans as well.
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The electronic status board at Duke & Duke's (seen prominently in the Christmas scene) is the "Big Money" board from Family Feud (1976).
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This was Don Ameche's first film since Suppose They Gave a War and Nobody Came (1970). He had been doing television guest appearances. This movie jump started his return to theatrical films, including an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for Cocoon.
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The exterior shots of Louis Winthorpe's house are of a house on a very affluent street in Philadelphia. The wreath on the door was replaced, when the producers wanted something bigger and better. They borrowed a handmade wreath from a house across the street.
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The Dukes' starting salary for Valentine ($80,000) is a little over $205,422.78 when adjusted for inflation in 2019. Their five-dollar "Christmas Bonus" for Ezra is $12.84 in 2019 dollars.
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In a 2013 interview, co-writer Timothy Harris talked about Hollywood's reluctance to make comedies satirizing greed and social conventions: "Trading Places is a sort of throwback film that owed more to the films of the '40s and '50s than it does to anything that was going on [in Hollywood] at the time it was made. Brewster's Millions (1985) was a social comedy about money and greed and what it does to people, but after that, there were no films like that being made anymore. Comedies were being directed at a specific groups of kids - teenagers - and that seemed to take over a great deal. I think it's probably an American thing - they're not interested in looking at that stuff particularly. I don't think Hollywood is either - it's awkward for them. The important people in Hollywood are really, really, filthy rich. They don't want to see that made fun of particularly."
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Even though she was considered the Scream Queen in Hollywood at this point, having starred in a slew of horror movies (Halloween (1978), Halloween II (1981), The Fog (1980), Terror Train (1980) and Prom Night (1980)) and even though horror movies were infamous for exploiting their female stars, Jamie Lee Curtis says she did not feel exploited in Hollywood until she went straight and started starring in mainstream movies like "Trading Places." She had never been asked to appear naked in any of the horror movies she starred; but once she went mainstream and starred in "Trading Places," she had to take her top off.
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(at around 3 mins) In the opening montage of Philadelphia there is a shot of the Rocky statue erected in Rocky III (1982), that was released the previous year, and was shot in front of the Philadelphia Spectrum arena. The statue now resides at the base of the museum steps.
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The Screenwriters hung out with drunk traders for research. "The traders I met and hung out with here in Los Angeles, because it was three hours behind New York City, had their happy hours very early in the day," Herschel Weingrod explained to National Public Radio. "You can imagine what they were like by, maybe, 2 p.m."
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(at around 1h 40 mins) When Winthorpe and Valentine arrive at the World Trade Center, Winthorpe tells Valentine "In this building, it's either kill or be killed". This line was removed from some television broadcasts after 2001, out of respect for the victims of the September 11 attacks.
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The opening piece of music is Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart from the Marriage of Figaro.
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Premiere voted this movie as one of "The 50 Greatest Comedies Of All Time" in 2006.
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A scene in the movie, not included in the theatrical cut, but seen frequently when the movie is shown on television (presumably to fill a longer time slot with commercials) occurs after Clarence Beeks (Paul Gleason) talks to the Dukes via telephone, and Billy Ray (Eddie Murphy) eavesdrops on their scheme. In the original cut, Beeks goes from the phone booth to the Amtrak train platform, holding the briefcase with the crop report. In the added scene we see Beeks procure the reports from a secured vault where he drugs a security guard and opens a safe deposit box.
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The idea for the film was inspired by a tennis game. "There were these two brothers who were both doctors who I would play tennis with on a fairly regular basis, and they were incredibly irritating to play with because they had a major sibling rivalry going, all the time about everything," Screenwriter Timothy Harris explained. He presented the idea of brothers arguing the "nature versus nurture" debate to his writing partner, Herschel Weingrod, and the two went to work.
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(at around 1h 4 mins) The punch line of Bunny's story ("...and she stepped on the ball") is a reference to Auntie Mame (1958), in which Gloria Upson tells a joke with the same punch line.
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While she was making this movie, Jamie Lee Curtis stayed in Marlene Dietrich's apartment (12E) at 993 Park Avenue in Manhattan. She'd been engaged to Dietrich's grandson, production designer J. Michael Riva.
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When John Landis was told that Don Ameche hadn't made a film in thirteen years, he asked if the actor had died.
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(at around 1h 6 mins) Winthorpe's watch, a "Rouchefoucauld", is named after French writer François de La Rochefoucauld. Winthorpe names six cities, with the intention that the watch tells six different time zones, which is not the case. Monte Carlo, Paris, Rome, and Gstaad all share the same time zone, so the watch tells only three.
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The baggage handlers were supposed to be Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas as the Mackenzie brothers from SCTV (1976). When they fell through, Dan Aykroyd or Eddie Murphy recommended Tom Davis and Al Franken from their Saturday Night Live (1975) days.
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The theme of rich men taking in a bum and passing him off as an aristocrat is reminiscent of the George Bernard Shaw play Pygmalion, and also includes specific elements of Hoi Polloi (1935), a previous American film parody of the same play. The theme of a rich and poor person exchanging positions in life comes from the Mark Twain novel The Prince and the Pauper.
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When shown on television in April, 1987, it was the highest-rated theatrical film broadcast by any network.
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(at around 1h 3 mins) The barbershop quartet song sung by Todd and his pals at the tennis club is sung to the tune of "Aura Lea", an American Civil War song written by W.W. Fosdick (words) and George R. Poulton (music).
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(at around 56 mins) When the Dukes are explaining commodities to Valentine, they have a plate with nine 1-kg bars of gold on it. At the time of release, this amount of gold would be worth roughly $119,070. In 2019 adjusted for inflation, this comes to $305,746.12. This does not take into account the current price of gold, but the price of gold in 1983 simply adjusted for inflation.
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(at around 1h 6 mins) R&B legend Bo Diddley appears as the pawnbroker that buys Louis's watch.
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(at around 1 min) In the opening credits, a clerk is putting away Philadelphia brand cream cheese from a box that is on top of a product labeled "Landis".
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(at around 1h 8 mins) When William (Billy Ray) is dining in the fancy restaurant with Mortimer, Randolph at a table full of other wealthy customers, while Louis stands in the rain and watches him through the window, the music playing in the background is the same as that was used in The Blues Brothers (1980), when Jake and Elwood are dining in the fancy restaurant, and trying to get "Mr. Fabulous" to rejoin the band.
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Remarkably similar story to a Three Stooges short from 1935 entitled The Three Stooges Collection: Hoi Polloi (1935). In the short two society men have the nature/nurture argument and bet $10,000 ($186,234.52 in 2019) that one of them can convert the Stooges into gentlemen.
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The original title: "Black and White".
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(at around 1h 29 mins) When pretending to be the exchange student from Cameroon, Valentine (Eddie Murphy) uses an affected laugh, which is based on that of Geoffrey Holder - something that Valentine would have seen on TV in the Seven Up "cola nut" commercials of the day or in the film Live and Let Die (1973).
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The character Billy Ray Valentine is based on a The Twilight Zone (1959) character named Henry Valentine in season 1 episode 28 The Twilight Zone: A Nice Place to Visit (1960). In this episode the small time crook Henry is killed and given everything he desires but grows weary of always winning.
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Dan Aykroyd and Jamie Lee Curtis also appeared in My Girl (1991), My Girl 2 (1994), and Christmas with the Kranks (2004).
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(at around 1h 29 mins) The stationmaster - the man who refers to the care and feeding instructions for the gorilla - is played by Stephen Stucker. He may have gone unnoticed in this film but he is well-known to audiences for his stage-stealing wisecracks in the film Airplane! (1980) and its sequel.
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Alfred Drake's last film.
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(at around 1h 20 mins) The "other" Santa Claus is Mike Strug, a television reporter who once worked for a network affiliate in the city of Philadelphia.
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The exterior of the men's club is really the Curtis Institute of Music.
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The final day of production for this movie was on March 1, 1983 on a beach in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
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The house used in the film is not the Rosenbach Museum and Library, but is a private house two doors west. Both houses, however, were built at the same time, and originally had identical floor plans. During the filming of the movie, DeLancey Place was closed for a few days. Denholm Elliott was the only actor in the film to visit the Rosenbach. The staff of the museum were all given Pennsylvania State Film Commission t-shirts.
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The Duke brothers' manipulation of Louis and Billy Ray's fates is similar to God and Satan's bet in the Book of Job in the Old Testament. God presents Job as a good example of a righteous man, but Satan says he is only faithful to God, because God has rewarded him. To test his faith, God agrees to let Satan take away all of his friends and riches. The climax, in which Louis and Billy Ray take their revenge by using false information to trick the brothers into losing money at the stock exchange, is not unlike how Edmond Dantès take his revenge on Danglars in "The Count of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas.
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The shooting schedule included fifteen days in Philadelphia for exterior scenes, and for the interior of the Duke & Duke Christmas party, which was located at the Fidelity Bank Building on Broad Street. Other locations in Philadelphia include Rittenhouse Square, Independence Hall, a street of restored townhouses in Center City for the exteriors of "Louis Winthorpe III's" house, and the Community College of Philadelphia for the exteriors of the police station. New York City locations, which were shot in January and February 1983, include the Park Avenue Armory for the Heritage Club, the Duke & Duke office interiors, and an Upper East Side residence, which was used for the interiors of Winthorpe's house. The apartment of Ophelia, Barney's Pawn Shop, and the interiors of the police station were all shot in New York City, even though they had Philadelphia locations in the context of the film.
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(at around 1h 45 mins) In the German dubbed version, after the official Crop Report was presented by the farming minister and trading restarts, Eddie Murphy is dubbed several times saying "Sie wollen kaufen?" which means "you want to buy?". That is obviously a translation error, as Winthorpe and Valentine have been short selling Orange Juice contracts in the beginning and at that point were buying them back at a lower price to close their positions.
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Sir John Gielgud and Ronnie Barker were offered the role of Coleman the butler.
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(at around 1h 30 mins) While disguised as Lionel, a Rastafarian, Louis makes mention of Haile Selassie who was emperor of Ethiopia for 44 years and is considered one of the fathers of the Rastafari religion.
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(at around 1h 50 mins) The Sailboat Louis and Ophelia are on at the end is a Nautical Development 56 foot boat called "Tandemeer" which is still sailing in the Caribbean today.
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The building used for the exterior of Duke & Duke Commodities Brokers is located at 123 South Broad Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. As of February 2014, it is a Wells Fargo Bank.
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On the train near the end of the movie the same song is playing in every scene in the bar car.
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Ray Milland was the first choice for the role of Mortimer Duke.
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Randolph Duke has a picture of Ronald Reagan on his side of the Dukes' shared desk, while Mortimer has a picture of Richard Nixon. Bryan Clark who portrayed Stock Exchange Official #2 has often played former President Ronald Reagan.
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(at around 37 mins) One of the portraits in the Heritage Club seen as Winthrope is being led out by security is J.P. Morgan identifiable by his large nose caused by a chronic skin disease called rosacea.
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Included among the American Film Institute's 2000 list of the 500 movies nominated for the Top 100 Funniest American Movies.
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The first of two movies in which characters played by Dan Aykroyd and Jamie Lee Curtis start off as strangers and go on to become lovers. The other is My Girl (1991).
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Former Senator Al Franken, former writer and cast member on Saturday Night Live (1975), and his partner, fellow writer and cast member Tom Davis play the baggage handlers on the train.
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(at around 1h 40 mins) When all the male traders in the bathroom hear the bell and rush out, not one pauses in the slightest to wash their hands.
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Loosely based on the 1954 British satirical film Man with a Million (1954), which starred Gregory Peck.
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(at around 56 mins) When explaining how their business works we can see a portrait of the Marquis De Lafayette over the right shoulder of Randolph Duke.
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Final acting role of Ralph Clanton (Official #1).
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Clarence Beeks shares his name with a jazz musician, who recorded under the name "King Pleasure".
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Tony Sherer, who plays Winthorpe's friend Phillip (the one who says they "need a fourth for squash"), ended up teaching Drama and English at the same private grade school attended by Bryce Dallas Howard.
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Casting Jim Belushi was a bit of stunt casting of course. John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd co-starred in John Landis' last big movie; The Blues Brothers (1980). This would be Jim Belushi and Aykroyd's only film together; in spite of John's long association with Aykroyd. John Belushi died in 82, just a year before this movie came out; and would have likely played the Billy Ray Valentine part of he had not passed away. Just like he would have played the Venkman character in Ghostbusters (1984); also slotted for him.
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This is the infamous movie where hitman/spy Paul Gleason gets raped by a gorilla.
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Film debut of Arleen Sorkin (Woman At Party).
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Cast includes one Oscar winner: Don Ameche and four Oscar nominees: Dan Aykroyd, Eddie Murphy, Ralph Bellamy and Denholm Elliott.
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(at around 1h 29 mins) Stephen Stucker, who played the crazy, wisecracking air traffic control staff person Johnny Henshaw in Airplane! (1980), makes a cameo here as a Stationmaster. He is Al Franken's boss.
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Both Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Jones were in Sneakers (1992).
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When Richard Pryor dropped out of the project early on, Gene Wilder pulled out soon after when he heard that Eddie Murphy said he would do the film but not with Wilder as he didn't want to be seen as copying Pryor's style. However the script was still being written at this point with Pryor and Wilder in mind so some of the dialogue written for Pryor was instead given to Murphy. This is particularly noticeable in the street begging scenes near the beginning of the film (as Murphy was far too young to be a Vietnam veteran at the time).
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The plot is also based on an episode of "The Three Stooges" television show in the episode, "Half-Wits Holiday" (1946). The storyline of two wealthy psychologists each argue that behaviour is formed by environment or nurture. They make a $1000 wager that one of them can transform three "morons" into gentlemen in 60 days. This episode is a reworking from a scene from their 1935 film, "Hoi Polloi". Sadly, this episode marks the end of Curly Howard's career as he suffers from a debilitating stroke shortly before the filming of the final scene, a pie fight.
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Film debut of John Bedford Lloyd.
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Denholm Elliott and Don Ameche both share the same birthday, May 31st. They died within a year of each other, Elliott in October 1992 and Ameche in December 1993.
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Cameo 

Kelly Curtis: (at around 1h 4 mins) The country club member "Muffy" is played by the sister of Jamie Lee Curtis, and the exteriors of that scene were filmed at The Curtis Institute of Music.
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George Folsey Jr.: (at around 5 mins) The executive producer appears as the first man to greet Winthorpe at Duke & Duke. (Dan Aykroyd refers to him by his real name with the line "Morning Folsey".)
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Richard Hunt: Frank Oz's fellow Muppeteer is Wilson, the Duke Brothers' trader on the stock exchange.
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Nicholas Guest: Jamie Lee Curtis' future brother-in-law appears as Harry.
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Giancarlo Esposito: (at around 23 mins) a very young Esposito, of Breaking Bad (2008) and The Mandalorian (2019) fame, in the jail cell with Billy Ray, credited as Cellmate #2.
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Jim Belushi: (at around 1h 27 mins) The man dressed as the gorilla in the train party scene.
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Arleen Sorkin: Woman at party.
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Director Cameo 

John Landis: (at around 25 mins) When Valentine is released from jail, he stands near three men in trench coats on the steps of the precinct. Landis has his back to Valentine holding a briefcase.
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Director Trademark 

John Landis: [prison number] (at around 39 mins) Louis' (Dan Aykroyd's) prison number is 74745058, which is the same prison number as Jake Blues (John Belushi) in The Blues Brothers (1980), also starring Aykroyd.
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John Landis: [police] (at around 37 mins) Frank Oz has a cameo as a police officer who is checking in Winthorpe's property when he gets arrested. In The Blues Brothers (1980), he played an officer who is giving Jake Blues his property back to him. Oz later reprised the role in Blues Brothers 2000 (1998).
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John Landis: [breaking the fourth wall] (at around 56 mins) When the Dukes explain to Billy Ray what bacon is, he looks directly into the camera as if to say, "These guys must think I'm a complete idiot."
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John Landis: [See You Next Wednesday] (at around 1h 10 mins) On a poster in Ophelia's apartment. The poster is actually William Wyler's Wuthering Heights (1939) starring Laurence Olivier and Merle Oberon.
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John Landis: [police] (at around 17 mins) When Billy Ray (Eddie Murphy) is cornered by the Philadelphia Police at the Heritage Club as he tries to crawl out from under the table the police point their weapons and cock them all in unison this was done previously done in The Blues Brothers (1980) when Jake (Dan Aykroyd) and Elwood (John Belushi) were cornered as they attempted to pay the past due tax bill at the Cook County Assesors Office.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

(at around 9 mins) The main titles are accompanied by the overture to "The Marriage of Figaro" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and in an early scene, as Louis is leaving his office he whistles the beginning of the aria "Se vuol ballare" from the opera. In that aria, Figaro declares his plan to turn the tables on his master, just as Louis and Billy Ray will eventually outwit the Duke brothers.
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(at around 1h 28 mins) G. Gordon Liddy was offered the part of Clarence Beeks, but turned it down after discovering Beeks' fate. Beeks is reading Liddy's book, "Will", on the train. Maurice Copeland, who plays the Secretary of Agriculture also played Attorney General John Mitchell in "Will: The Autobiography of G. Gordon Liddy (1982)."
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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