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Jack Nicholson (‘Terms of Endearment’) blasts off after being voted top Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s [Poll Results]

Jack Nicholson (‘Terms of Endearment’) blasts off after being voted top Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s [Poll Results]
Jack Nicholson may be known more for his leading roles, but he just won Gold Derby’s poll of Best Supporting Actor Oscar winners of the 1980s. Nicholson has been voted your favorite Best Supporting Actor of that decade, for his performance as retired astronaut Garrett Breedlove in James L. Brooks‘ Best Picture winner “Terms of Endearment” (1983).

SEEMeryl Streep (‘Sophie’s Choice’) is clear choice for top Best Actress Oscar winner of 1980s [Poll Results]

Nicholson won with 19% of the vote, narrowly beating several beloved performances. Denzel Washington (“Glory”) came in second place with 16%, followed by Sean Connery (“The Untouchables”) and Kevin Kline (“A Fish Called Wanda”) at 15% each. Timothy Hutton (“Ordinary People”) finished out the top five at 13%.

Beyond this five there was a drop-off, with Michael Caine (“Hannah and Her Sisters”) netting 7%, Louis Gossett Jr. (“An Officer and a Gentleman”) and Haing S. Ngor (“The Killing Fields”) at 5% each and
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Meryl Streep (‘Sophie’s Choice’) is clear choice for top Best Actress Oscar winner of 1980s [Poll Results]

Meryl Streep (‘Sophie’s Choice’) is clear choice for top Best Actress Oscar winner of 1980s [Poll Results]
Meryl Streep‘s heart-wrenching performance in “Sophie’s Choice” is your easy choice for the top Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s. The legendary actress handily won Gold Derby’s recent poll asking you to vote for your favorite Best Actress winner of the decade, trouncing most of her competition.

Streep won with an astonishing 51% of the vote — very impressive in a field of 10 powerhouse winners. The only other actress to rack up a double-digit percentage is Cher in “Moonstruck” with 15%. Shirley MacLaine (“Terms of Endearment”) and Sissy Spacek (“Coal Miner’s Daughter”) tied for third at 7% apiece, while Jodie Foster (“The Accused”) and Katharine Hepburn (“On Golden Pond”) were next at 6% each. Further down, Jessica Tandy (“Driving Miss Daisy”) earned 3% and Marlee Matlin (“Children of a Lesser God”) and Geraldine Page (“The Trip to Bountiful”) tied at 2%. Sally Field (“Places in the Heart”) came in last place with
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Amadeus’ voted top Best Picture Oscar winner of the 1980s, rising above all ‘mediocrities’ [Poll Results]

While Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) says in “Amadeus” that he speaks for “all mediocrities in the world,” the film clearly rises above such mediocrities, according to you. The 1984 movie is your favorite Best Picture winner of the 1980s, based on the votes of a recent Gold Derby poll. The biopic about the complicated relationship between Salieri and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce) narrowly won the vote over the nine other ’80s winners.

Amadeus” won with 25% of the vote, just barely beating “Rain Man” (1988), which earned 21%. The rest of the top five included “Platoon” (1986) in third at 15%, “Terms of Endearment” (1983) in fourth with 12% and “Ordinary People” (1980) in fifth at 10%. No other films came close to this top five, with a three movies earning 4% of the vote: “Driving Miss Daisy” (1989), “Gandhi” (1982) and “The Last Emperor” (1987). “Out of Africa” (1985) drummed up 3% of the vote while “Chariots of Fire” (1981) was the last to
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Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]

Milos Forman (‘Amadeus’) voted top Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s, as orchestrated by you [Poll Results]
Milos Forman, who passed away on April 13, has been voted your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1980s for his masterwork “Amadeus.” The biopic chronicled the infamous rivalry between Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce). Much like the film itself being your preferred Best Picture winner of the ’80s, Forman was your choice for the top Best Director winner of the decade in Gold Derby’s recent poll.

Forman won with 22% of the vote, with Oliver Stone (“Platoon”) coming in second place with a respectable 16%. It was a tie for third between James L. Brooks (“Terms of Endearment”) and Robert Redford (“Ordinary People”) at 11% apiece. Sydney Pollack (“Out of Africa”) rounded out the top five with 9% of the vote. Next up, Barry Levinson (“Rain Man”) came in sixth with 8%, Richard Attenborough (“Gandhi”) came in seventh with 7% and Bernardo Bertolucci (“The Last Emperor”) came in
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]
Like the other acting winners of the 1980s, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor went to big stars and character actors alike. The ’80s featured big-name winners like Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Sean Connery and Michael Caine alongside hardworking veterans like John Gielgud, Louis Gossett Jr. and Don Ameche. The Academy also rewarded emerging talent, like Timothy Hutton, Haing S. Ngor and the now double-champ Denzel Washington.

So who is your favorite Best Supporting Actor winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Timothy Hutton, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Hutton came out of the gate strong with his heartbreaking performance in Best Picture winner “Ordinary People.” Hutton plays Conrad Jarrett, a teenager wracked with guilt after his brother is killed in a boating accident. Hutton is clearly the lead of the film, but at age 20, the studio may have felt it fairer
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Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]
The 1980s saw several legendary dames winning Best Actress at the Oscars, including academy favorites like Katharine Hepburn and Meryl Streep. The entire decade was a good one for women dominating their films, like Sissy Spacek, Shirley MacLaine, Sally Field, Geraldine Page, Cher and Jodie Foster. The ’80s also set records that still stand today, with Marlee Matlin being the youngest Best Actress winner at age 21 and Jessica Tandy being the oldest winner at 80.

So which Best Actress winner from the ’80s is your favorite? Look back on each of their performances and vote in our poll below.

Sissy Spacek, “Coal Miner’s Daughter” (1980) — The ’80s began with Spacek earning her Oscar for playing country music star Loretta Lynn in the biopic “Coal Miner’s Daughter.” Spacek earned a previous nomination for “Carrie” (1976) and four subsequent nominations, for: “Missing” (1982), “The River” (1984), “Crimes of the Heart” (1986) and “In the Bedroom” (2001).

SEE
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The 25 Best Movies on Hulu Right Now

In an age of options, less feels like more. While Netflix has an ever-expanding library, Hulu offers a more focused collection of great movies. Because volume isn’t the objective, Hulu succeeds in curating a batch of excellent films. There are the Academy Awards classics like Terms of Endearment and Rocky, the arthouse darlings like Babel and The Hunt, and the pure entertainment gems like Raiders of the Lost Ark and Goon.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]
The 1980s at the Oscars were full of matches between Best Picture and Best Director. Of the 10 Best Director winners, eight of their films won Best Picture, including Robert Redford, Richard Attenborough, James L. Brooks, Milos Forman, Sydney Pollack, Oliver Stone, Bernardo Bertolucci and Barry Levinson. The only instances of a Picture/Director split were in 1981 when Warren Beatty won for “Reds” and 1989 when Stone won his second directing Oscar for “Born on the Fourth of July.”

So who is your favorite Best Director winner of the ’80s? Look back on each of their wins and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Robert Redford, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Redford’s directorial debut proved he had the chops, winning for the harrowing domestic drama “Ordinary People.” Redford’s other Oscar nominations were for “The Sting” (1973) in Best Actor and both Best Picture and Best Director for “Quiz Show” (1994).

SEEDirector Ava DuVernay
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What’s your favorite Best Picture Oscar winner of 1980s: ‘Rain Man,’ ‘Terms of Endearment,’ ‘Platoon’ … ? [Poll]

What’s your favorite Best Picture Oscar winner of 1980s: ‘Rain Man,’ ‘Terms of Endearment,’ ‘Platoon’ … ? [Poll]
The 1980s were a big era for the “epic” movie winning Best Picture at the Oscars. “Chariots of Fire,” “Gandhi,” “Out of Africa,” “Platoon” and “The Last Emperor” all share that grand-scale style of film that tends to be rewarded decade after decade at the Oscars. The ’80s also included just as many intense character studies winning Best Picture, including “Ordinary People,” “Terms of Endearment” and “Amadeus,” while others were on the lighter side, like “Rain Man” and “Driving Miss Daisy.”

In this divisive decade, which Best Picture-winning film remains your favorite? Let us take a look back on each winner and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Ordinary People” (1980) — “Ordinary People,” Robert Redford‘s directing debut, has gotten a bad rap over the years for beating Martin Scorsese‘s “Raging Bull,” but it remains one of the most moving films to win Best Picture. The film tells
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Netflix, Key and Peele and Coraline Director Team for Stop-Motion Movie

Netflix, Key and Peele and Coraline Director Team for Stop-Motion Movie
Just days after winning the Best Original Screenplay Oscar, Jordan Peele is reuniting with his Key & Peele co-star/co-creator Keegan-Michael Key for Netflix's Wendell and Wild. Jordan Peele and Keegan-Michael Key will both lend their voices to the two title characters in the stop-motion animated comedy, which will be directed by Henry Selick. This also comes less than two months after Jordan Peele proclaimed that he has retired from acting.

Back in January, just a few days before the Oscar nominations were announced, Jordan Peele revealed in an interview that he was retiring from acting, so he could focus more on his burgeoning filmmaking career. The filmmaker became the first black director to be nominated in both the writing and directing categories for his first feature film, and just the third filmmaker ever to achieve this feat, following Warren Beatty (Heaven Can Wait) and James L. Brooks (Terms of Endearment). Last month,
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Oscar Best Picture winners in order: ‘The Shape of Water’ joins these 89 esteemed films

Oscar Best Picture winners in order: ‘The Shape of Water’ joins these 89 esteemed films
On Oscar’s 90th birthday, “The Shape of Water” was declared the winner of Best Picture in a move that most awards pundits didn’t see coming. Of the 89 former Best Picture winners, Guillermo del Toro‘s fairy tale for troubled times is now only the second fantasy film to claim the honor after “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King.” While that 2003 epic had dragons and hobbits, “The Shape of Water” tells the story of a mute woman (Sally Hawkins) who falls in love with a sea creature. “Shape” also won Best Director, Best Score and Best Production Design. Click through our photo gallery above to see our updated Best Picture gallery featuring all 90 winners in order.

See 2018 Oscars: Complete list of winners (and losers)

One of Oscar’s favorite genres over the past nine decades has been war movies. In all, 16 war films have won
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018 Winners, the Complete List

Oscars 2018 Winners, the Complete List
The biggest names in Hollywood have gathered at the Kodak Theater in the Hollywood and Highland center for the 90th Annual The Academy Awards tonight, hosted by Jimmy Kimmel. As the Oscars are handed out, we'll be updating this story live with all of the big winners, so you can keep refreshing to find out the latest news, if you're unable to watch from home. There will definitely be a number of intriguing stories to keep an eye on tonight, one of which being how prevalent the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements are at the ceremony.

During the Golden Globes in January, a number of stars, male and female alike, sported special pins in support of the Times Up Now movement, while also wearing black to support the cause. Times Up Now was formed at the beginning of this year by a coalition of over 300 women in the entertainment industry, from actresses to writers,
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Reflecting on Meryl Streep’s record 21 Oscar nominations and celebrating her 3 wins (to date)

Reflecting on Meryl Streep’s record 21 Oscar nominations and celebrating her 3 wins (to date)
Over the past month, the Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars has looked back at Meryl Streep’s 21 Oscar nominations, including her 2018 bid for “The Post.” We have considered the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

For a film buff and awards season aficionado, there is perhaps no more exhilarating a journey than going back to revisit all 21 Streep performances that brought her to the Oscars, plus her competition over the years – a grand total of 105 performances, most richly deserving of their recognition.

While Streep has three Academy Awards — for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979), “Sophie’s Choice” (1982) and “The Iron Lady” (2011) — a case could surely be made that she has deserved even more. She is at her career-best in “The Bridges of Madison County” (1995) and, if not for the juggernaut that was Shirley MacLaine in “Terms of Endearment
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Frances McDormand & Sam Rockwell (‘Three Billboards’) are 6th duo to win Best Actress & Best Supporting Actor

2018 Oscars: Frances McDormand & Sam Rockwell (‘Three Billboards’) are 6th duo to win Best Actress & Best Supporting Actor
By winning Oscars for Best Actress and Best Supporting Actor during Sunday’s ceremony, Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri”) just became only the sixth duo in Academy Awards history to claim both acting prizes. McDormand and Rockwell were heavily favored to win after claiming similar trophies at the Golden Globes, BAFTAs, Critics’ Choice, SAG Awards and Indie Spirits. “Three Billboards” now joins this esteemed list of five Oscar movies that took home both acting kudos:

Million Dollar Baby” (2004)

Best Actress for Hilary Swank as Maggie Fitzgerald

Best Supporting Actor for Morgan Freeman as Eddie “Scrap-Iron” Dupris

Terms of Endearment” (1983)

Best Actress for Shirley MacLaine as Aurora Greenway

Best Supporting Actor for Jack Nicholson as Garrett Breedlove

See 2018 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 90th Academy Awards [Updating Live]

Cabaret” (1972)

Best Actress for Liza Minnelli as Sally Bowles

Best Supporting Actor for Joel Grey as
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep (‘The Post’) loses at Oscars for 18th time, crushing her own record

Meryl Streep (‘The Post’) loses at Oscars for 18th time, crushing her own record
Over the past four decades Meryl Streep has amassed 21 Oscar nominations, more than any performer in Academy Awards history. She won three of those races, making her a member of the exclusive three-timers club of which there are only two other living members: Daniel Day-Lewis and Jack Nicholson. However, there’s a unique downside to Queen Meryl’s Oscar reign. After losing Best Actress for “The Post” Sunday night to Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Streep now has 18 Oscar failures on her hands, extending her record as the biggest acting loser of all time.

SEE2018 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 90th Academy Awards [Updating Live]

Streep’s losses straddle 39 years, including 15 as Best Actress and 3 as Best Supporting Actress. Her first loss for “The Deer Hunter” (1978) happened four decades ago, setting the stage for a remarkable Oscar trajectory full of a few ups and many, many downs.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018: 'The Shape Of Water' wins best picture

Oscars 2018: 'The Shape Of Water' wins best picture
Roger Deakins finally wins cinematography award after 14 nominations.

The Shape Of Water won best picture, best director and two other Oscars as a dignified, fiercely proud and often emotional 90th annual Academy Awards ended without scandal or administrative error.

Fierce yet tempered defiance coursed through Sunday’s show as the deep-rooted response to the Harvey Weinstein sex scandal dovetailed with passionate and wide-ranging statements related to equality and diversity, and the inevitable pop at the Trump administration so detested within Hollywood.

Jordan Peele won best original screenplay for Get Out and thanked ’my mother who taught me to love in the face of hate.” The winner was only the third man to be nominated for best picture, directing, and original screenplay after Warren Beatty for Heaven Can Wait in 1979, and James L Brooks for Terms Of Endearment in 1984.

His award came shortly after an intense interlude that brought the most overt reference of the night to the Hollywood sex scandal. An emotional Annabella Sciorra, who has alleged Harvey Weinstein raped her, was joined on stage by Ashley Judd, who claimed Weinstein sexually harassed her in an exposé last October that opened the floodgates to dozens of allegations against the disgraced former mogul.

“[E]quality, diversity, inclusion and intersectionality – that’s what this year has promised us,” Judd said. Joined on stage by Salma Hayek, the three women cued up a video segment on equality and diversity featuring contributions from Mira Sorvino – another Weinstein accuser – as well as Ava DuVernay, Lee Daniels, Kumail Nanjiani, Hayek, Barry Jenkins, and others.

Familiar winners

Jane Fonda and Helen Mirren appeared on stage to present best lead actor award to Oldman for Darkest Hour. The British veteran said, “I would just like to salute Sir Winston Churchill, who has been marvellous company on what has been an incredible journey.”

Jodie Foster on crutches – prompting a neat gag that Meryl Streep had “Tonya’d” her – and Jennifer Lawrence appeared on stage to present the best lead actress award to McDormand for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. The previous year’s best actor winner typically presents the award, however Casey Affleck elected to remove himself from the show so as not to distract with his own involvement in a previous allegation of sexual impropriety.

McDormand, who was highly emotional and possessed of a skittish, eccentric energy, asked every female nominee in the Dolby Theatre to stand up and bask in recognition. “We all have stories to tell and projects we need financed,” McDormand said, asking the movers and shakers not to discuss these projects at the post-show parties, but call up in the week and start a serious business conversation. She signed off with two words: “Inclusion rider.”

After 14 nominations, Roger Deakins finally won the cinematography Oscar, claiming the award for his work on Blade Runner 2049. ”You know, I really love my job,” Deakins said. ”I’ve been doing it a long time as you can see. But you know, one of the reasons I really love it is the people I work with, both in front of the camera and behind the camera. Some of my crew on Blade Runner, I’ve been working with for over thirty years, and others I met for the first time in Budapest. And this is for every one of them, every one of them. In fact, I gotta say it’s for us, because it was a team. It was really a team effort.

James Ivory thanked his “fearless producer of close to 50 years” the late Ismail Merchant when he collected the best adapted screenplay Oscar for Call My By Your Name. Allison Janney took to the stage to collect her award for best actress in a supporting role for I, Tonya.

Pixar’s Coco won the animation feature Oscar and produced a stirring acceptance speech from director Lee Unkrich, who praised Mexico’s “endlessly beautiful culture and traditions,” adding: “Marginalised people deserve to feel like they belong. Representation matters.”

Chile’s A Fantastic Woman by Sebastian Lelio earned a big cheer when it was named best foreign-language film. Immediately after that award. Director Sebastian Lelio thanked “the inspiration for this movie, Daniela Vega. This film was made by a lot of friends and artists; I share this will all of you tonight.”

Fox Searchlight’s The Shape Of Water – which began the night as the lead contender on 13 nominations – won its first Oscar about an hour into Sunday’s 90th annual Academy Awards, earning a production design gong for Paul D. Austerberry, Jeffrey A. Melvin, and Shane Vieau. The fantasy drama followed that up nearly two hours later with the award for best score going to Alexandre Desplat as the ceremony headed into the final furlong. Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez won best song for ‘Remember Me’ from Coco.

Bryan Fogel’s Russian doping scandal film Icarus was named best documentary feature. “We hope Icarus is a wake-up call – yes about Russia, but about telling the truth, now more than ever,” Fogel said. Speaking to press backstage, Fogel said of his film’s distributor, “Netflix has single‑handedly changed the documentary world. They have given voice to documentary in a way that no company or distributor has ever done before.”

The first award of the night at the 90th annual Academy Awards went to Sam Rockwell for best actor in a supporting role for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.

Lee Smith won the best editing Oscar for Dunkirk, which earlier in the evening collected honours for sound editing (Richard King and Alex Gibson), and sound mixing (Gregg Landaker, Gary Rizzo, Mark Weingarten). John Nelson, Gerd Nefzer, Paul Lambert, Richard R. Hoover won the visual effects Oscar for Blade Runner 2049.

The award for makeup and hairstyling was presented to Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, Lucy Sibbick for Darkest Hour. Following that in short order was the achievement in costume design, which went to Mark Bridges for Phantom Thread.

In another strong message of support for diversity – not to mention a thinly veiled attack on the Trump administration – presenters Lupita Nyong’o (Black Panther) and Kumail Nanjiani (The Big Sick) referenced their immigrant roots.

“We are dreamers,” Nyong’o said, citing the so-called immigrants brought to the Us as children whose future hangs in the balance while the courts weigh up the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals law. “Dreams are the foundation of Hollywood. And dreams are the foundation of America.”

Kimmel jokes

Show host Jimmy Kimmel, in his second consecutive year in the role, kicked off the evening with a reference to last year’s best picture mix-up, before referencing the Hollywood sex scandal and speaking in favour of change.

“This year when you hear your name called, don’t get up right away,” Kimmel said in reference to last year’s mix-up when the best picture award was mistakenly presented to La La Land before it correctly went to Moonlight.

On the Weinstein sex scandal, he said: “If we can work together to stop sex harassment in the workplace, women will only have to deal with harassment every other place they will go.” He praised the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements that sprung up in response to the avalanche of reports and revelations over sexual predators in the industry. “What they’re doing it important… this is a night for positivity,” Kimmel said.

There was also a mention of the huge discrepancy in pay received by Mark Wahlberg and Michelle Williams in their All The Money In The World reshoot scenes. Noting how both worked for the same agency, Kimmel got a big laugh when he said, “And if you can’t trust an agent…” Kimmel reserved words of praise for the success of commercial smash and cultural touchstone Black Panther, and riffed good-naturedly on its box office success at times in the show.

In the short film categories, Kobe Bryant took to the stage to receive the Oscar for his animation short Dear Basketball, on which he served as writer and executive producer. Heaven Is A Traffic Jam On The 405 won best documentary short, and The Silent Child won in the live action category.

Jet ski spot prize

In its annual quest to reverse a gradual ratings decline and end long, often tedious litanies of thanks to people few viewers have ever heard of, the Academy and show producers offered an $18,000 jet ski to the winner who gave the shortest speech. The watersports vessel – paraded during Kimmel’s opening monologue by Helen Mirren in glamourous garb – eventually went to Phantom Bridge costume designer Mark Bridges, whose words of thanks clocked in at a trim 30 seconds.

The show tried two other gimmicks. Lakeith Stanfield ran on to the stage dressed as his character from Get Out and riffed with Kimmel, while in another segment the host bantered with a child actor purporting to be his six-year-old self who then proceeded to read out a list of nominees.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Oscars 2018: 'The Shape Of Water' wins best picture

Oscars 2018: 'The Shape Of Water' wins best picture
Roger Deakins finally wins cinematography award after 14 nominations.

The Shape Of Water won best picture, best director and two others Oscars as a dignified, fiercely proud and often emotional 90th annual Academy Awards ended without scandal or administrative error.

Click here for full winners list

Guillermo del Toro collected the best picture award from Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty – invited back in a generous touch by the show producers after last year’s best picture mix-up – and dedicated the award to “the youth who are showing us how things are done.”

Gary Oldman was named best actor for Darkest Hour
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Oscars 2018: Gary Oldman wins best actor for 'Darkest Hour'

Oscars 2018: Gary Oldman wins best actor for 'Darkest Hour'
Roger Deakins finally wins cinematography award after 14 nominations. Follow Sunday’s 90th annual Academy Awards live here.

Guillermo del Toro won the best directing Oscar for The Shape Of Water, becoming the third Mexican in the last five years to claim the prize.

“I am an immigrant… like Alfonso [Cuaron] and Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu], my compadres, like Gael [Garcia Bernal], like Salma [Hayek], like many, many of you,” del Toro said. “And in the last 25 years I’ve been living in a country all of our own. The greatest thing our industry does it to erase the lines in the sand.”

After 14 nominations, Roger
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Oscars 2018: Roger Deakins wins best cinematography for 'Blade Runner 2049'

Oscars 2018: Roger Deakins wins best cinematography for 'Blade Runner 2049'
Will Guillermo del Toro win best director on Sunday? Follow Sunday’s 90th annual Academy Awards live here.

After 14 nominations, Roger Deakins finally won the cinematography Oscar, claiming the award for his work on Blade Runner 2049.

Jordan Peele won best original screenplay for Get Out and thanked ’my mother who taught me to love in the face of hate.” The winner was only the third man to be nominated for best picture, directing, and original screenplay after Warren Beatty for Heaven Can Wait in 1979, and James L Brooks for Terms Of Endearment in 1984.

His award came shortly after an
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Oscars 2018: Sam Rockwell wins best supporting actor

Oscars 2018: Sam Rockwell wins best supporting actor
Will Guillermo del Toro win best director on Sunday? Will DoP Roger Deakins finally lay his hands on the prize? Follow Sunday’s 90th annual Academy Awards live here.

The first award of the night at the 90th annual Academy Awards has gone to Sam Rockwell for best actor in a supporting role for Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.

Show host Jimmy Kimmel, in his second consecutive year in the role, kicked off the evening with a reference to last year’s best picture mix-up, before referencing the Hollywood sex scandal and speaking in favour of change.

“This year when you hear your name called,
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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