6.2/10
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258 user 80 critic

Never Say Never Again (1983)

Trailer
1:26 | Trailer
A S.P.E.C.T.R.E. Agent has stolen two American nuclear warheads, and James Bond must find their targets before they are detonated.

Director:

Irvin Kershner

Writers:

Kevin McClory (based on an original story by), Jack Whittingham (based on an original story by) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
2,694 ( 275)
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Sean Connery ... James Bond
Klaus Maria Brandauer ... Maximilian Largo
Max von Sydow ... Blofeld (as Max Von Sydow)
Barbara Carrera ... Fatima
Kim Basinger ... Domino Petachi
Bernie Casey ... Leiter
Alec McCowen ... 'Q' Algy
Edward Fox ... 'M'
Pamela Salem Pamela Salem ... Miss Moneypenny
Rowan Atkinson ... Small-Fawcett
Valerie Leon ... Lady in Bahamas
Milos Kirek Milos Kirek ... Kovacs (as Milow Kirek)
Pat Roach ... Lippe
Anthony Sharp ... Lord Ambrose
Prunella Gee ... Patricia
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Storyline

S.P.E.C.T.R.E. Agents under the command of Ernst Blofeld infiltrate a U.S. Air Force base situated in the U.K. and steal two Tomahawk cruise missiles. When N.A.T.O. is held ransom, the British re-activate their "00" Agents and send James Bond to recapture the warheads and kill Blofeld. Written by Dave Jenkins <david.jenkins@smallworld.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Sean Connery is back as James Bond 007 [USA poster] See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Final performance by Sir Sean Connery playing James Bond in a movie, though he provided the vocal work as Bond in the video game "From Russia with Love (2005)." See more »

Goofs

When Fatima skis into him in the bar, Bond is drinking a martini in a martini glass. After some dialogue, in which he refers to the martini, he is drinking a smaller golden drink in a different glass. See more »

Quotes

Small-Fawcett: Jolly good!
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Alternate Versions

Network TV (US and UK) version omits final few seconds of death of Lippe. In the theatrical release, Bond throws a urine sample in Lippe's face, who staggers backwards into a cupboard full of beakers, then falls face down, dead, with several glass beakers embedded in his back. This last fall is not shown in the TV version, leaving Lippe dead for no apparent reason. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Goldeneye (1989) See more »

Soundtracks

Une Chanson d'Amour
Music by Michel Legrand
Lyrics by Michel Legrand and Jean Dréjac
Performed by Sophie Della
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User Reviews

The only Bond remake. Pointless but fun.
3 October 2003 | by barnabyrudgeSee all my reviews

Never Say Never Again got its title because Sean Connery had said in the 1970s (shortly after Diamonds Are Forever) that he would "never" do another Bond film. However, in 1983 he was persuaded to return to the role for a one-off special, a remake of his fourth entry Thunderball, and his wife rather humorously said to him that in the future he should make a point never to say never again. This film actually came out close to a Roger Moore entry in the series (Octopussy), and although Connery had more admirers as 007 than Moore, it was surprisingly Octopussy that scored a bigger box office hit.

Connery's Bond is older and more vulnerable than we remember him. His boss, M, doesn't hold him in very high regard and actually suggests that he take some time off in a plush health spa. During his time here, Bond uncovers a strange plot and the further he delves into the mystery the more he discovers. It seems that his old adversaries SPECTRE, fronted by the nefarious Blofeld (Max Von Sydow) have stolen two nuclear warheads which they will detonate if they are not paid an extortionate ransom. Chief overseer of this hideous plan is Emile Largo (Klaus Maria Brandeur), and Bond pursues Largo around the globe in an attempt to stop him, visiting such places as Monte Carlo and North Africa during the course of the mission.

The music by Michel Legrand is poor by series standards. It sounds rather similar to his music for the sleazy 1981 movie Your Ticket Is No Longer Valid, and is really ill-suited to this Bond production. However, in terms of villains, they've come with a couple of great ones for this film. Largo, as personified by Brandeur, is smooth but deadly, and hench-woman Fatima Blush (Barbara Carrera) is uncommonly disturbing. Rowan Atkinson also has a fairly good role as a dim-witted agent assigned to "help" Bond. The big action sequences are quite good, especially the horse chase around the North African sea-fortress and the motorbike chase, although some of the underwater moments are tough to understand because it's hard to figure out who is who behind the diving masks.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK | USA | West Germany

Language:

English | French | Spanish | Arabic

Release Date:

7 October 1983 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Warhead See more »

Filming Locations:

Almería, Andalucía, Spain See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$36,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$10,958,157, 10 October 1983

Gross USA:

$55,432,841

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$55,432,841
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (cut)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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