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The Keep (1983) Poster

(1983)

Trivia

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Director Michael Mann's original cut of the film ran three and a half hours.
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The main set of The Keep (1983) was built in an disused abandoned former slate quarry at Glyn Rhonwy near Llanberis in North Wales. Some interiors of "The Keep" were filmed inside the natural stonework of the Llechwedd Slate Caverns near the historic mining town of Blaenau Ffestiniog in Gwynedd, Wales. Michael Mann once described the set by saying: "It's a black monumental structure that might have been built by a medieval Albert Speer."
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Michael Mann once described this film as: "A fairy story for grown-ups. Fairy tales have the power of dreams, from the outside. I decided to stylize the art direction and photography extensively, but use realistic characterization and dialogue."
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While it was released on VHS and LaserDisc, it has never been released on DVD or Blu-ray. It has been noted that Paramount was going to release it on DVD in 2004, but two reasons have stopped them from doing so. First, the studio wasn't able to obtain the rights of the soundtrack by Tangerine Dream. Second, Michael Mann, who has disowned the film, forced the studio not to release it. It is currently available on DVD, as of May 1, 2017.
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Final feature film of legendary Visual Effects Supervisor Wally Veevers, who died in the middle of post-production. The film is dedicated to his memory. The closing credits dedication states: "The Keep production pays tribute to Wally Veevers".
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This is the second and last collaboration of German electronic music group Tangerine Dream with Michael Mann. Mann said in a 1983 interview:"...we have a terrific relationship. I think their work on Thief (1981) was very successful. This music is very different. This is much more melodic, there are different influences. We're using Thomas Tallis, we're using a lot of choirs processed through a vocoder. I've got in my brain maybe seven or eight hours of their music."
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First American Hollywood theatrical feature film of Sir Ian McKellen and Jürgen Prochnow.
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The armored car seen in several scenes, is the same vehicle used as "Gruber's Little Tank" in BBC's 'Allo 'Allo! (1982).
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First film directed by Michael Mann to be shot in 2.35:1 widescreen ratio. All of his other feature films have since been shot in this aspect ratio. Mann explained this choice in a 1983 interview: "It's important to me for two rea­sons. One, because this is an expression­istic movie that intends to sweep its au­dience away - be very big, to have them transport themselves into this dream-re­ality so that they're in those landscapes, there with the characters. You can't sweep people away in 1:1,85 and mono. Also, I'm just not interested in 'pas­sive' filmmaking, in a film that's pre­cious and small and where it's up to the audience to bring themselves to the movie. I want to bombard an audience - a very active, aggressive type of se­duction. I want to manipulate an audi­ence's feelings for the same reasons that composers write symphonies."
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In the film's narrative, the 'Keep' is to a massive uninhabited castle, citadel or fortress located at the 'Dinu Pass' in the Carpathian Alps in Transylvania, Romania. In the film, the interiors of the 'Keep' are said to contain 108 T-shaped icons made of nickel. According to Author F. Paul Wilson, both elements of his story are fictitious: No building like 'The Keep' ever existed, and no 'Dinu Pass' can be found in Romania.
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The name of the demon character was "Radu Molasar", but it is also known simply in abbreviated form as just "Molasar". The monster was conceptualized by French Comics Artist Enki Bilal.
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Michael Mann once said of World War II: "There is a moment in time when the unconscious is externalized. In the case of the twentieth century, this time was the fall of 1941. What Hitler promised in the beer gardens, had actually come true. The greater German Reich was at its apogee: it controlled all Europe, and the dark psychotic appeal underlying the slogans and rationalizations was making itself manifest."
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The film includes elements of the "Golem" narrative, the Old Testament story of "The Binding of Isaac", the old German myth of the "Faustian pact with the Devil", and the old Romanian vampire myth, which is especially present in F. Paul Wilson's novel.
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A board game, based on the movie, was designed by James D. Griffin, and published by Mayfair Games in 1983.
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Unsuccessful at the box-office upon release, the picture is now considered a cult movie.
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The writer of the original novel, F. Paul Wilson, was so unimpressed by Michael Mann's adaptation of his work, that he wrote a short story called "Cuts", in which a writer puts a voodoo curse on a director, who has mangled his work.
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Theatrical trailer shows some deleted and extended scenes; Longer conversation between Woermann and Alexandru in which Woermann says that the keep looks like it was build to keep something in, longer version of the scene where Molasar is talking with professor Cuza for the first time, also in this scene Cuza asks Molasar "What are you?" one more time, Glaeken talking with Eva asking her did she find what she was looking for and did she expect to find him, Glaeken touching Eva's face while she asks "What's happening to me?", Glaeken walking inside the keep with his eyes turning white, longer version of the ending where Glaeken is standing at the entrance of the keep looking over Molasar's fog/white smoke, different version of the scene (different visual effects) where Glaeken is walking towards the room where Molasar is waiting for him, in this alternate scene Glaeken's sword is covered with some glowing grey light.
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Principal photography on the picture experienced major delays at times, due to severe raining.
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Michael Mann retreated to television after the commercial and artistic disappointment of The Keep (1983), where he then created the hugely successful cop drama show Miami Vice (1984). It was stylistically influenced by Mann's feature debut Thief (1981).
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While doing research, Michael Mann even looked at locations in Romania, which was an isolated Communist country at that time: "I found Romania fascinating. My preconception about what Romania was going to be like was all wrong. I expected some kind of Kafkaesque gray city, but of course since the war never rolled through there, it's not. It looked like Paris, cafés opened until one o'clock in the morning, and people walking around. It's a very lively, vital kind of place, and with a lot of humor, a lot of really cynical humor." [March 1984]
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According to Wikipedia, source novelist F. Paul Wilson has "publicly expressed his distaste for the film version" of his 1981 novel. Wilson wrote in his short story collection "The Barren (and Others)" that the movie is "visually intriguing, but otherwise utterly incomprehensible".
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Jürgen Prochnow got cast in this movie after his international breakthrough lead role in the German World War II film Das Boot (1981).
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in a 1983 interview Michael Mann referred to psychologist Dr. Bruno Bettelheim's "The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales" [first published in 1976] as an inspiration for his movie. Mann also said about his film, that "...it's very much a magical, dream-like, fairy-tale reality."
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According to Time Out, Michael Mann's film "...was first buried in video distribution (in the UK) after it flopped in the U.S. (by that time, Mann was already involved in the highly successful television series Miami Vice (1984), (but the film was then) resurrected for cinema screening (in Britain)."
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In his unparalleled career production designer John Box designed three Best Picture Academy Award winners (Lawrence of Arabia (1962), A Man for All Seasons (1966), and Oliver! (1968)), and three Best Picture Academy Award nominees (Doctor Zhivago (1965), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), and A Passage to India (1984)). He was nominated six times for an Academy Award, winning four times, and six times for the BAFTA, winning three times.
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Timothy Block worked eight weeks.
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In the novel, "Glaeken" calls himself "Glenn". In this movie, "Glaeken" is played by Scott Glenn.
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Shot over a period of thirteen weeks. Being a troubled production, additional re-shoots were required after the initial shoot, meaning the full production period was twenty-two weeks.
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Two weeks into post-production, Visual Effects Supervisor Wally Veevers died. No one had really been apprised of what he intended for the main effects for the film, meaning that everyone was essentially fumbling around in the dark. This amounted to about two hundred sixty shots.
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Paramount refused to pay for the big special effects showdown that Michael Mann had envisioned, hence the current film's slightly muted ending.
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The second feature film directed by Michael Mann.
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The film was released two years after its source novel of the same name by F. Paul Wilson had been published.
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Star billing in 1983: Scott Glenn (first), Alberta Watson (second), Jürgen Prochnow (third), Robert Prosky (fourth), Gabriel Byrne (fifth) and Sir Ian McKellen (sixth).
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One of two movies released in 1983, in which Scott Glenn appeared. The other film was The Right Stuff (1983).
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According to Halliwells, the film is a "combination of war and fantasy fiction, not entirely dissimilar from Castle Keep (1969) which had a similar exposition".
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Second feature film featuring Alberta Watson, with a music score by German electronic music group Tangerine Dream. The other film was James Glickenhaus' The Soldier (1982).
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The opening title card reads: "Dinu Pass - Carpathian Alps - Romania - 1941".
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Three members of the main cast have since appeared in three Best Picture Academy Award winning films: Scott Glenn in The Silence of the Lambs (1991), Jürgen Prochnow in The English Patient (1996), and Sir Ian McKellen in The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003).
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Captain Claus Woermann (Jürgen Prochnow) is reading the anti-war novel "Soldat Suhren" by German Author Georg von der Vring. The book is shown in close-up when Major Kaempffer (Gabriel Byrne) is looking through the papers on Woerman's desk. "Soldat Suhren" was first published in 1927, became a popular bestseller, and is recognized as the first German novel about the war. It is ironic, humorous, and has an anti-war, pacifist message. Since Claus Woermann is characterized as an anti-fascist and humanist Wehrmacht soldier, the book must have appealed to him for these reasons.
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There are only two location descriptions in this movie. The opening location description is "Dinu Pass - Carpathian Alps - Romania - 1941". Later, the narrative jumps to the character Glaeken, and the description for his location is "Piraeus, Greece". The city Piraeus really exists in Greece, but there is no 'Dinu Pass' to be found anywhere in Romania, because it's an invention of the author F. Paul Wilson. Director Michael Mann said in an interview from 1984, that he still travelled to Communist Romania to do location scouting and research, but later Wales was chosen to represent it.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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