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Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]
Like the other acting winners of the 1980s, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor went to big stars and character actors alike. The ’80s featured big-name winners like Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Sean Connery and Michael Caine alongside hardworking veterans like John Gielgud, Louis Gossett Jr. and Don Ameche. The Academy also rewarded emerging talent, like Timothy Hutton, Haing S. Ngor and the now double-champ Denzel Washington.

So who is your favorite Best Supporting Actor winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Timothy Hutton, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Hutton came out of the gate strong with his heartbreaking performance in Best Picture winner “Ordinary People.” Hutton plays Conrad Jarrett, a teenager wracked with guilt after his brother is killed in a boating accident. Hutton is clearly the lead of the film, but at age 20, the studio may have felt it fairer
See full article at Gold Derby »

Lewis Gilbert, Esteemed British Director/Producer, Dead At 97

  • CinemaRetro
Gilbert on the set of the 1977 James Bond blockbuster The Spy Who Loved Me with production designer Ken Adam and producer Albert R. Broccoli at Pinewood Studios, London.

By Lee Pfeiffer

Cinema Retro mourns the news of director/producer Lewis Gilbert's death in London at age 97. Gilbert was a good friend to our magazine and gave what is probably his last interview to our correspondent Matthew Field several years ago. It ran in three consecutive issues of Cinema Retro (#'s18, 19 and 20). 

Gilbert had a remarkable career that began early in life as a music hall performer and an actor in small roles in British films. During WWII he served in the Raf, producing and directing documentaries for the military. His first feature film as director was "The Little Ballerina", released in 1947. Gilbert toiled through directing low-budget, often undistinguished films, honing his craft along the way. He earned praise for
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Lewis Gilbert, James Bond Director, Dies at 97

Lewis Gilbert, James Bond Director, Dies at 97
British director Lewis Gilbert, director of three classic James Bond movies, has died at the age of 97. Gilbert got his start as a child actor in 1933 in Dick Turpin and eventually made himself into an accomplished director. During the course of his long career, Gilbert amassed more than 40 credits. Gilbert was remembered by the official James Bond Twitter account following the news of his death.

"British director, producer and screenwriter Lewis Gilbert has passed away at the age of 97. Gilbert directed three Bond films; You Only Live Twice (1967), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979). Our thoughts are with his family at this sad time."

Lewis Gilbert had been working as a director for more than two decades before tackling his first movie in the James Bond franchise, which came in the form of 1967's You Only Live Twice. The movie is significant, as it was the last of Sean Connery
See full article at MovieWeb »

Bond, ‘Alfie’ Director Lewis Gilbert Dies At The Age Of 97

Lewis Gilbert, the legendary British Bond director has sadly passed away at the age of 97. The filmmaker was responsible for many of the early 007 adventures, as well as Michael Caine’s break-out, Alfie.

Gilbert helmed You Only Live Twice, The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker, as well as his 1980s reunion with Caine in the Oscar-nominated Educating Rita.

Bond producers Michael G Wilson and Barbara Broccoli confirmed the news via a joint statement.

“It is with great sadness that we learn of the passing of our dear friend Lewis Gilbert.”

“Lewis was a true gentleman. He made an enormous contribution to the British film industry as well as the Bond films, directing You Only Live Twice, The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker. His films are not only loved by us but are considered classics within the series. He will be sorely missed.”

Gilbert passed away in Monaco on
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Lewis Gilbert, Director of ‘Alfie’ and Three James Bond Films, Dies at 97

Lewis Gilbert, Director of ‘Alfie’ and Three James Bond Films, Dies at 97
Prolific British director Lewis Gilbert, whose credits include “Alfie” and three James Bond films, has died. He was 97.

British director, producer and screenwriter Lewis Gilbert has passed away at the age of 97. Gilbert directed three Bond films; You Only Twice (1967), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979). Our thoughts are with his family at this sad time. pic.twitter.com/gu4EGro0pg

— James Bond (@007) February 27, 2018

Gilbert’s directing career spanned seven decades with credits on more than 40 films, from the 1945 documentary “The Ten Year Plan” to the 2002 comedy “Before You Go,” starring Julie Walters.

He was born in London in 1920 and performed as a child actor in films in the 1920s and 1930s, before choosing to study direction, assisting on Alfred Hitchcock’s “Jamaica Inn” in 1939. During World War II, he worked on films while serving with the Royal Air Force’s film unit and the U.S. Army Air Forces.

After the war,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lewis Gilbert obituary

Film director whose long and varied career produced hits including Alfie and Educating Rita

The film director Lewis Gilbert, who has died aged 97, never sought the limelight: he always said he wanted his films to speak for him, and several of them, including Alfie (1966) and Educating Rita (1983), have become part of cinema history.

Alfie is the story of an amoral young man who philosophises to camera on sex, love and women as he pursues sexual encounters with one girl after another. Paramount wanted the setting moved to New York and Tony Curtis to play Alfie, but Gilbert held out for Michael Caine. Caine’s performance assured his career, and the film was nominated for five Oscars.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

R.I.P. Lewis Gilbert (1920 – 2018)

Oscar-nominated British filmmaker Lewis Gilbert has passed away aged 97, it has been announced.

Born in London in 1920, Gilbert started his career as a child actor before deciding to move behind the camera, serving as an assistant to Alfred Hitchcock on 1939’s Jamaica Inn.

After serving in the Royal Air Force’s film unit during World War II, Gilbert made his name as a writer and director during the 1950s and 1960s with the likes of Reach for the Sky and Sink the Bismarck! before enjoying huge success with 1966’s Alfie, which was nominated for five Oscars including Best Picture.

The following year, Gilbert went on to direct the first of three 007 movies, You Only Live Twice, before reuniting with Roger Moore for The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker. His later credits included 1983’s Educating Rita, 1989’s Shirley Valentine, and his final film Before You Go in 2002.

The post R.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Lewis Gilbert, Director of James Bond Hits ‘Moonraker’ and ‘You Only Live Twice,’ Dies at 97

  • The Wrap
Lewis Gilbert, Director of James Bond Hits ‘Moonraker’ and ‘You Only Live Twice,’ Dies at 97
Lewis Gilbert, the Oscar-nominated British filmmaker whose credits include “Alfie” and three James Bond titles, died on Feb. 23, according to multiple media reports. He was 97. Gilbert’s Bond titles include “You Only Live Twice,” “The Spy Who Loved Me” and “Moonraker.” “Alfie” won the Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival in 1966 and scored five Oscar nominations including Best Picture. His other films include “Sink the Bismark,” “Educating Rita” and “Shirley Valentine.” Born in London in 1920, Gilbert became a child actor in the 1920s and 1930s, landing a role in Victor Hanbury and John Stafford’s “Dick Turpin” in...
See full article at The Wrap »

Keeping The British End Up: Lewis Gilbert (1920 – 2018)

Author: Cai Ross

Bond fans are mourning the loss at the fine old age of 97, of director Lewis Gilbert. Gilbert was responsible for three of the biggest James Bond films of the 60s and 70s, You Only Live Twice, The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker.

His Bond movies took everything up to eleven. They all featured immense lairs for larger than life villains. In You Only Live Twice, Donald Pleasance’s HQ was housed inside a Japanese volcano. Moonraker’s climax was set on board a gargantuan space station, and The Spy Who Loved Me’s goliath supertanker set was so huge that thee producers had to build an entire sound stage at Pinewood to accommodate it.

The Spy Who Loved Me was an enormous gamble, an expensive doubling-down after the disappointing returns of The Man With The Golden Gun. The producers were rewarded with one of the biggest
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Lewis Gilbert, director of 'Alfie', 'Educating Rita' and three 'Bond' films, dies aged 97

Gilbert was made a fellow of the British Film Institute in 2001.

Lewis Gilbert, best known for directing Alife and three James Bond films, has died aged 97.

According to reports he passed away on February 23. His funeral will be held in Monaco next week

Alfie, starring a young Michael Caine, won the jury prize at Cannes in 1966 and received five Oscar nominations including best picture.

Gilbert’s Bond entries were You Only Live Twice with Sean Connery and The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker starring Roger Moore.

His other films included Sink The Bismark, the Bafta-winning Educating Rita and Shirley Valentine.

Gilbert was awarded a Cbe in 1997 and was made a fellow of the British Film Institute in 2001.

Heather Stewart, BFI Creative Director, said: “The BFI salutes the most prolific of British filmmakers. Awarded our highest accolade, a BFI Fellowship for his outstanding contribution to British film, everything from three Bond films – including the best, You Only Live Twice – and definitive
See full article at ScreenDaily »

2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse

2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” won the very first BAFTA Award of the evening on Feb. 18 when it was named Best British Film. And it ended the night by claiming the Best Picture prize. That marked just the second time since the British academy reintroduced Best British Film in 1992 that the same movie won both awards. The only other double dipper was “The King’s Speech,” which went to win Best Picture at the Oscars in 2011.

It might seem odd that a film like “Three Billboards,” which is set in the American heartland, qualified for consideration as Best British Film. However, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and co-financed by UK broadcaster Channel 4.

See 2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards’ wins 5 including Best Picture, ‘The Shape of Water’ takes 3 [Updating Live]

Over the last quarter century, seven other British films have been named Best Picture at the BAFTAs: “Howards End
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?
“Darkest Hour” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” each reaped nine nominations for the 2018 BAFTA Awards. Among these are bids for Best British Film. While that nomination for the former makes sense given the subject matter and pedigree of Joe Wright‘s biopic about prime minister Winston Churchill, the latter doesn’t appear to be British. However, while the film is set in the American heartland, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and that qualified it for consideration in this category.

Both films also number among the five in contention for Best Picture, alongside the American-made “The Shape of Water” and the international co-productions “Call Me By Your Name” and “Dunkirk.” Fans of either of “Darkest Hour” or “Three Billboards” should be rooting for one of their rivals in the Best British Film race — “The Death of Stalin,” “God’s Own Country,” “Lady Macbeth” or “Paddington 2” — to win on Feb.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]
The Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in the 1990s went to many long overdue veterans of the industry. Actors like James Coburn, Jack Palance and Martin Landau finally earned Oscars in this decade, alongside then-newer stars like Cuba Gooding Jr and Kevin Spacey. What is your favorite Best Supporting Actor performance of the 1990s?

Read through a recap of their performances and vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Supporting Actor.)

Joe Pesci, “Goodfellas” (1990) — Joe Pesci won his Oscar with the most iconic role of his career. In “Goodfellas” Pesci plays Tommy DeVito, a blustering gangster who provides some of the funniest lines in the film. Pesci was previously nominated in Best Supporting Actor for “Raging Bull” (1980).

SEEWho’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1990s: Steven Spielberg, James Cameron, Jonathan Demme … ? [Poll]

Jack Palance, “City Slickers” (1991) — Jack Palance finally won his Oscar thanks to “City Slickers,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘Sophie’s Choice’: A look back at her second Oscar win and the competition

Meryl Streep in ‘Sophie’s Choice’: A look back at her second Oscar win and the competition
This article marks Part 4 of the 21-part Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

After “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” in 1981, Meryl Streep lined up two exciting projects for the following year, both lead turns and both given prime late-year release dates for Academy Awards consideration.

First on tap was Streep’s much-anticipated reunion with “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979) director Robert Benton. “Still of the Night” would mark her first big screen thriller to date, pairing Streep with two-time Oscar nominee Roy Scheider. Exciting, right? Well, the Benton picture came and went that November in the blink of an eye, failing to even crack the box office top 10. Not only were reviews for the film itself lukewarm but critics argued both
See full article at Gold Derby »

Win A Family Four Pack Of Passes To The Advance Screening Of Paddington 2 In St. Louis

Following the worldwide hit “Paddington,” one of the most successful family films of all time, this much-anticipated sequel finds Paddington (Ben Whishaw) happily settled with the Brown family in London, where he has become a popular member of the local community, spreading joy and marmalade wherever he goes.

While searching for the perfect present for his beloved Aunt Lucy’s hundredth birthday, Paddington sees a unique pop-up book in Mr. Gruber’s antique shop, and embarks upon a series of odd jobs to buy it. But when the book is stolen, it’s up to Paddington and the Browns to unmask the thief.

Reuniting many of the original film’s cast while welcoming those in new roles, Paddington 2 stars Golden Globe nominee Hugh Bonneville (“Downton Abbey”), Oscar nominee Sally Hawkins (“Blue Jasmine”), three-time Golden Globe nominee Brendan Gleeson (“The Guard,” “Into the Storm,” “In Bruges”), Oscar nominee Julie Walters (“Billy Elliot,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Olivia de Havilland on Becoming the Oldest Person to Be Named a Dame: I’m ‘Extremely Proud’

Olivia de Havilland on Becoming the Oldest Person to Be Named a Dame: I’m ‘Extremely Proud’
The actress known to millions as Gone With the Wind‘s Melanie Wilkes is now officially Dame Olivia de Havilland.

The 100-year-old two-time Oscar winner was named a Dame Commander in Queen Elizabeth II‘s Birthday Honors list on Saturday, becoming the oldest-ever person to achieve the distinction.

Of the honor, de Havilland said in a statement to People that she is “extremely proud that the Queen has appointed me a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire.”

“To receive this honor as my 101st birthday approaches is the most gratifying of birthday presents,” she said.

Promoted along
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Raising Caine: Sir Michael Going On In Style

Tony Black on screen legend Michael Caine

His recent political leanings aside, Sir Michael Caine remains one of the surviving legends of British and indeed American cinema of the last fifty years, and this weekend’s Going in Style–a heist caper directed by none other than ScrubsZach Braff–sees him share top billing with fellow aged legend Morgan Freeman for what seems the first time in a while. Over recent years the iconic British figure–known for his slick Cockney accent which bore fruit with numerous catchphrases in more than one seminal British film–has become more widely known to audiences as a character actor, heavily used in Christopher Nolan’s body of work since appearing as Alfred Pennyworth in Batman Begins.

So began a certain career resurgence for the man born Maurice Micklewhite under the sound of bow bells, but as Sir Michael–now into his 80’s
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Always in Style – The Forgotten Roles of Michael Caine

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Zehra Phelan

“You’re were only supposed to blow the bloody doors off” is and will always be Michael Caine’s most iconic line of all time, uttered in the 1969 British Caper The Italian Job. With a career spanning a hefty 64 years between 1953 and 2017, Caine hits our screens yet again this week starring opposite Morgan Freeman and Alan Arkin in Going in Style, a remake of the 1979 heist comedy directed by Zach Braff. It tells the story of a trio of retirees who plan to rob a bank after their pensions are cancelled, proving he isn’t quite ready to hang up his acting shoes to start drawing his own pension.

At the tender age of 84 the man previously known as Maurice Joseph Micklewhite, now known as Sir Michael Caine after being knighted by the queen in 2000, has starred in a staggering 125 films in his career to date. His
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Reliving the joys of an 80s TV Christmas

Jenny Morrill Dec 20, 2016

Russ Abbot, Bullseye, Noel Edmonds and a film we all watched in the same room. Christmas TV was more exciting in the 80s...

Cast your mind back to when Christmas Day wasn't about Doctor Who followed by sticking something on Netflix until it was time to go watch the annual fist fight outside the pub.

See related Looking back at Martin Scorsese's The King Of Comedy The Wolf Of Wall Street review The Wolf Of Wall Street & Scorsese's confrontational films

In the 80s, Christmas was about seeing which fantastic fare the TV had decided to bless us with. Of course, the more prepared among us knew this well in advance, having eagerly pored over the Radio Times/TV Times to check that Jimmy Cricket's Family Laugh 'n' Waz would be shown. There it was – right after Reflections On The Eucharist With The Reverend Paul Leyland.
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘The Crown’ Creator Peter Morgan on the Making of His Royal Series

‘The Crown’ Creator Peter Morgan on the Making of His Royal Series
Writer Peter Morgan is well-versed in the world of Queen Elizabeth, given his award-winning film “The Queen” and his play “The Audience.” But he found he still has more story to tell about the monarch with his new TV series, “The Crown,” which bows Nov. 4 on Netflix.

Here, he tells Variety about his inspiration for the lavish new drama, how he cast the lead roles, and what’s in store for future seasons.

Why did you want to tell this story?

I didn’t really. I’m sick of writing the world of Elizabeth. But when we did the play “The Audience” the scene between Churchill and the young queen struck me as having lots of potential — this young 25-year-old girl and this 73-year-old, this daughter and this grandfather. And yet he was so in awe of her. I thought, I’d like to try writing this as a movie, Churchill
See full article at Variety - TV News »
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