5.6/10
4,363
37 user 29 critic

D.C. Cab (1983)

The misadventures of a group of unfortunate but street-wise cabbies working for a Washington, D.C. decrepit taxicab company.

Director:

Joel Schumacher

Writers:

Topper Carew (story), Joel Schumacher (story) | 1 more credit »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Max Gail ... Harold
Adam Baldwin ... Albert Hockenberry
Mr. T ... Samson
Charlie Barnett Charlie Barnett ... Tyrone
Gary Busey ... Dell
Gloria Gifford ... Miss Floyd
Marsha Warfield ... Ophelia
Bill Maher ... Baba
Otis Day ... Bongo (as DeWayne Jessie)
Paul Rodriguez ... Xavier
Whitman Mayo ... Mr. Rhythm
Peter Paul ... Buddy (as Peter Barbarian)
David Paul ... Buzzy (as David Barbarian)
Irene Cara ... Self
Diana Bellamy ... Maudie
Edit

Storyline

The tale of a hapless group of cabbies and a rundown cab company owned by Harold. Albert comes to town with a dream of starting his own cab company but needs to motivate Harold's employees to want to make something out of themselves. It is only when Albert is kidnapped that the cabbies must decide whether or not they are loyal to Albert and his cause. Written by Josh Pasnak <chainsaw@intouch.bc.ca>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Pity the fool who messes with Mr. T. See more »

Genres:

Action | Comedy

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Irene Cara: As herself. Cara also sings one song in the film, "The Dream (Hold On To Your Dream)". See more »

Goofs

Peter Paul and David Paul do not have the beards they wore throughout the film in the finale. This is possibly due to the original concept of Irene Cara performing The Dream in person not going ahead as planned, and the parade scene being shot slightly later after principal photography was complete and the beards had been shaved off. See more »

Quotes

Dell: If I wanted responsibility I woulda been a damn sex surrogate!
See more »

Crazy Credits

At the end of the closing credits, The Angel Of Death gets into Tyrone's cab. He says, "I am the Angel of Death, take me to Hell", to which Tyrone responds, "Got any Luggage?" See more »

Connections

Referenced in No Time (1994) See more »

Soundtracks

Squeeze Play
Performed by Karen Ichiuji-Ramone (as Karen Kamon)
Written by Andy Goldmark, Phil Gladston
Courtesy of Columbia Records
See more »

User Reviews

 
Not one of the greatest comedies but not bad either
9 May 2006 | by elgatonySee all my reviews

When I first saw this as a kid I was sort of let down because Mr.T's name and image were all over the ads and what I got was an ensemble piece instead with Adam Baldwin as the lead. My reaction was "huh?".

Watching it again 20 years later and knowing not to get too worked up over Mr. T (c'mon, he had his own cereal for crying out loud) I felt completely different about this film. First of all, I had to put myself back in 1983. Many popular comedies of the day were mostly crude, sexist, racist, homophobic and would make a PC advocate shriek and hide under the bed. I bring this up because Joel Schumacher, an openly gay director, should've known better but since he co-wrote it with someone else I don't know which jokes were his so I'll give him the benefit of the doubt. Porky's, Doctor Detroit and Car Wash are just some examples of this kind of humor. Back to the movie: As a kid I had no idea who they were but today it's kind of cool seeing a young Paul Rodriguez, Patricia Duff (yes, THAT Duff...Ron Perelman's very rich ex), Gary Busey, Marsha Warfield, Irene Cara and Bill Maher when he wasn't gray. Because of the ensemle nature of the movie some shine more than others. I don't even know why Maher is in this movie as he has very little to do. You may laugh at Mr. T's sermonizing (in a very funny but great zoom-out scene involving the Lincoln Memorial no less)but it's refreshing to him delivering the same "make something of yourself" message today. It fits with the theme of the movie. Still, this isn't for little kids because of the naked women and the nature of the humor. A few words on the very underrated Adam Baldwin. He was only 21 in 1983 yet he's the glue that holds this motley crew together. I liked his roles early in his career but I haven't seen him much after "Full Metal Jacket" which is a shame because he holds his own in that too. Working with Kubrick couldn't have been easy. Sure there are problems with this movie, for example a romance between Baldwin and a waitress that doesn't really go anywhere and a thin kidnapping plot but nevertheless, "DC Cab" is an entertaining, feel-good time capsule. A refreshing escape from the mean-spirited, recycled or self contgratulatory comedies Hollywood wants us to pay $10.50 for today. If you think Joel Schumacher's movies are garbage today as I do, check your prejudices at the door. This is way better than Batman & Robin. With "DC Cab", you'll have yourself a new guilty pleasure.


13 of 15 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 37 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 December 1983 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Capitol Cab See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$8,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,564,530, 18 December 1983

Gross USA:

$16,134,627

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$16,134,627
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed