Edit
The Verdict (1982) Poster

(1982)

Trivia

Jump to: Cameo (2)  | Spoilers (3)
Two cast members - Edward Binns and Jack Warden - played jurors #6 and #7, respectively, in 12 Angry Men (1957), which was likewise directed by Sidney Lumet.
55 of 55 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Among the people in the courtroom during the dramatic closing speech is a young Bruce Willis.
119 of 122 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Robert Redford was originally involved with this film. After writer David Mamet delivered his draft, Redford was uncomfortable with the main character and hired another writer to do another draft, and so on until Redford decided he didn't want to do the film. He was uncomfortable because he did not want to play an alcoholic. Sidney Lumet was offered the project. He read all the drafts and identified the original Mamet version as the one to make. At that point, Paul Newman agreed to star.
76 of 77 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Though entitled "The Verdict", the original final draft of David Mamet's screenplay had no verdict in it. Producer Richard D. Zanuck commented that the title would require a question mark on advertising materials making it "The Verdict?". It was director Sidney Lumet who convinced Mamet to add in a verdict so the film could have a third act denouement.
36 of 36 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Sidney Lumet didn't read the novel until after he did the movie because of David Mamet's screenplay.
31 of 31 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
After the verdict was announced in the film, director Sidney Lumet filmed two versions of the ending. In one version, the final shots we see are of Newman's character walking away from the courtroom in a series of long shots, never seeing what happens after he leaves the courthouse. In the version that was used, we see a sequence after he leaves the courthouse.
28 of 28 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Frank uses eye drops to hide the redness in his eyes caused by alcoholism. According the DVD commentary by Sidney Lumet, this was Paul Newman's own idea.
24 of 24 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Frank Sinatra offered to play the lead role of Frank Galvin for nothing.
58 of 62 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Rehearsals prior to principal photography ran for three weeks, a period customary for director Sidney Lumet.
21 of 21 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Julie Christie turned down the role of Laura Fischer.
27 of 28 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The movie was nominated for five Academy Awards (Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor & Best Adapted Screenplay) but failed to win any Oscars in any category.
34 of 36 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The production shoot ran for forty-three days and finished one week ahead of schedule.
25 of 26 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
As this legal drama features a woman in a permanent vegetative state, the picture was made and released hot on the heels of the 1970s Karen Ann Quinlan legal case, which was fresh in the minds of the public consciousness and had recently been the subject of the 1977 tele-movie In the Matter of Karen Ann Quinlan (1977).
14 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Although the film was set in Boston, Massachusetts, most of it was shot on sound stages in New York City.
14 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
[June 2008] Ranked #4 on the American Film Institute's list of the 10 greatest films in the genre "Courtroom Drama".
27 of 29 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Final American feature film for a major Hollywood movie studio starring British actor James Mason.
26 of 28 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
According to producer Richard D. Zanuck, director Sidney Lumet had final cut.
13 of 13 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
A number of high-profile actors were all considered for or wanted parts in this movie by virtue of the strength of the lead central role. These included Dustin Hoffman, Jon Voight, Roy Scheider, Frank Sinatra, Cary Grant, Robert Redford and William Holden. In the end the part was cast with Paul Newman.
31 of 34 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
James Mason was anxious to work with Sidney Lumet again, and although the actor was offered the part eventually played by Jack Warden, Lumet didn't believe he wanted to do it. At the prompting of his wife, Mason called the director and, fortuitously, Burt Lancaster, who was set to play Concannon, dropped out, and that opened up the role for Mason.
18 of 19 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The main movie poster for the film featured a long text preamble that read: "Frank Galvin Has One Last Chance At A Big Case. The doctors want to settle, the Church wants to settle, their lawyers want to settle, and even his own clients are desperate to settle. But Galvin is determined to defy them all. He will try the case".
17 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Star Paul Newman once said of this movie whilst publicizing the picture: "I'd rather have the freedom to do the kind of pictures like The Verdict (1982) . . . I enjoyed kicking the beejeezus out of the press in Absence of Malice (1981)".
22 of 24 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Sidney Lumet said that if anyone had ever sent him the book to read before he decided to direct the movie, he would have told them that there was no way that the material in the book could ever be adapted to film.
8 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This film and the previous year's The Postman Always Rings Twice (1981) were the first film screenplays of writer-dramatist David Mamet.
12 of 13 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Producers Richard D. Zanuck and David Brown picked up the original option on the film's source, Barry Reed's novel "The Verdict", for US $150,000. Zanuck and Brown had read the book one week before it had been first published in 1980.
9 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
As recommended to the producers by Robert Redford, writer-director James Bridges was going to write the film's screenplay, and even direct the film at one point, and ended up writing several drafts of the screenplay. Reportedly, Bridges left the project when Robert Redford didn't like any of his scripts.
8 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
[June 2006] Ranked #75 on the American Film Institute's "100 Years . . . 100 Cheers: America's Most Inspiring Movies" list.
8 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Paul Newman's performance ranked #19 in Premiere Magazines 100 Greatest Performances.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The film was made and released about two years after its source novel of the same name by Barry Reed was first published in 1980. The book was the first novel of Reed and has been translated into a dozen languages.
6 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Roy Scheider was a favorite for Frank Galvin when director Arthur Hiller was involved.
6 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Paul Newman was Sidney Lumet's first choice for the role of Frank Galvin.
11 of 15 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
It is the only Best Picture Oscar nominee that year not to win any Academy Awards.
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
[November 2008] Ranked #254 on Empire's "500 Greatest Movies of All Time" list.
6 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This film and Tootsie (1982) were the first on-screen movie appearances of actor Tobin Bell.
8 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Deborah Ann Kaye was admitted to St. Catherine Labouré Hospital on May 12, 1976. This was the 28th birthday of cast member Lindsay Crouse (Kaitlin Costello Price), the then wife of the screenwriter David Mamet.
6 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The only dramatic narrative cinema movie starring Paul Newman and directed by Sidney Lumet, though Newman had appeared about a dozen years earlier in Lumet's documentary King: A Filmed Record... Montgomery to Memphis (1970).
5 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
James Mason was the only Best Supporting Actor Oscar nominee that year that was from a Best Picture nominated film.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
[June 2003] The Frank Galvin character (played by Paul Newman) was one of the 400 characters nominated for the American Film Institute's "100 Years...100 Heroes and Villains" lists of 50 heroes and villains.
4 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Arthur Hiller was originally attached to direct. Hiller was a mainstay at the 20th Century Fox studio around the time that the film was made. In 1982, the year that The Verdict (1982) first launched, Hiller had two films out that he had directed at Fox, these were Making Love (1982) and Author! Author! (1982). Reportedly, Hiller left The Verdict (1982) because he did not like David Mamet's script.
5 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
After The MacKintosh Man (1973), this was Paul Newman and James Mason's second and final film together.
2 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In the opening scene and several scenes afterward, Frank Galvin is playing a "Saturday Night Fever" pinball machine in a bar. Julie Bovasso, who plays the nurse Maureen Rooney, appeared as John Travolta's mother in Saturday Night Fever (1977).
2 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The film reunites Jack Warden and James Mason after co-starring in Heaven Can Wait (1978).
2 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The value of the legal settlement that got turned down was US $210,000.
6 of 31 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Francis P. Galvin was born in Lowell, Massachusetts in 1927.
2 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The film takes place in February 1982.
1 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In the novel on which the movie is based, the turned-down settlement offer of $210,000 is referred to a "Guzinta" because the amount "goes into" three, referencing Galvin's contingency fee.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Paul Newman and Lindsay Crouse (Kaitlin Costello Price) also starred together in Slap Shot (1977).
1 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The film cast includes one Oscar winner: Paul Newman, and four Oscar nominees: Jack Warden, James Mason, Charlotte Rampling and Lindsay Crouse.
1 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In The Verdict, Jack Warden gives a shoulder massage to Paul Newman; in Heaven Can Wait (1978), instead, his character (Max Corkle) receives a message from Warren Beatty.
1 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The courtroom number where the case was tried is 214.
0 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Charlotte Rampling & James Mason acted in Georgie Girl.
0 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

Cameo 

Bruce Willis: Uncredited, as a Courtroom Observer.
18 of 23 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Tobin Bell: Uncredited, as a Courtroom Observer.
8 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The last sequence was not in the script. Sidney Lumet devised the scene with Paul Newman and Charlotte Rampling, wanting to show that Laura was drinking while Frank was not. Newman confirmed that Frank was drinking coffee at the end. This is meant to show that Frank has escaped from his personal Hell while Laura has brought herself into one. Frank's refusal to answer Laura's phone call is his refusal to give in to his old vices.
51 of 52 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Both lawyers, Galvin and Concannon, engage in unethical conduct for which both would have been subject to disbarment. Galvin received a settlement offer from the Archdiocese, and yet he never told his clients about the offer or asked them if they wanted to accept it. That is unethical and prohibited conduct on the part of a lawyer. His clients reveal that his opponent, Concannon, told them about the settlement offer. When a lawyer knows that a party is represented by counsel, the lawyer is prohibited from speaking directly with that party in the absence of their attorney. Concannon also engages in unethical conduct when he pays Laura to get close to Frank and learn his trial strategy and secrets, which she does. That conduct is also expressly prohibited by the lawyers' Code of Professional Responsibility.
46 of 49 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
They edited a version of The Verdict by cutting out the bar joke.
2 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page


Recently Viewed