7.5/10
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7 user 1 critic

Inside the Third Reich (1982)

A dramatization of the life of Albert Speer, Adolf Hitler's young architect and onetime confidant, and his meteoric rise into the Nazi hierarchy. The film is based on Speer's autobiography ... See full summary »

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Won 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 1 win & 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Albert Speer
... Albert Speer Sr.
... Mrs. Speer
... Margarete Speer
... Prof. Heinrich Tessenow
... Adolf Hitler
... Gypsy woman
... Putzi Hanfstaengel
... Karl Hanke
... Dr. Joseph Goebbels
... Magda Goebbels
... Eva Braun
... Field Marshal Milch
... Annemarie Kempf
... Dr. Rust
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Storyline

A dramatization of the life of Albert Speer, Adolf Hitler's young architect and onetime confidant, and his meteoric rise into the Nazi hierarchy. The film is based on Speer's autobiography of the same name. Written by Dawn M. Barclift

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9 May 1982 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

I diari del terzo reich  »

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(archival footage)|

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Hans Meyer was offered the role of Ernst Kaltenbrunner, due to his performance in the miniseries Holocaust (1978), in which Meyer played the same role. See more »

Goofs

At the end of the film Speer is told that Adolf Hitler died at 1500 or 3:00 PM. This is wrong. The approximate time of Adolf Hitler's death is 4:30 PM. See more »

Quotes

Adolf Hitler: No German is to inhabit land occupied by the enemy. Anyone who does so, any wretch will find himself in a desert, devoid of all the amenities of civilization. I repeat, I reemphasize: I want everything essential to the maintenance of life destroyed. All industrial plants, all gas and water and power, electrical works, telephone exchanges. I want them blown up! Destroyed completely! No more ringing! Dismantle them. Cut the telegraph wires. The relay offices, blow them up. And the spare parts... ...
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User Reviews

 
An excellent insider's view of the Third Reich
6 November 1999 | by See all my reviews

This movie is a fine adaptation of Albert Speer's autobiography of the same name. It is at its best when showing us the vicious backstabbing and tawdry competition among Hitler's top men. Speer walks among these power-hungry vipers like an aristocrat among peasants; indeed, the movie can be faulted for taking Speer too much at his own evaluation, and not showing how he was corrupted and influenced by the company he kept. Some of the other characterizations are not quite accurate either - Speer's wife, Marguerite, in reality was not the voice of conscience continuously warning him that what he was doing was wrong and they were all doomed. Other biographies have revealed her to be generally uncritical and in some ways pleased with her elite position as the wife of one of Germany's top men. And while Speer's father was a liberal and against the Nazis, their relationship was not as warm and open as shown here, and Speer was not greatly influenced by him. In fact, it is hard to believe that Speer could have easily followed the path he did in life if all the most important, beloved and admired people in his life had been as clear-sighted and vocal about his mistakes as they are shown to be here. The movie thus falsifies some of the historical atmosphere, and overlooks to what extent perfectly respectable middle-class people in Germany thought Hitler was wonderful. But these flaws are outweighed by the movie's strengths - Derek Jacobi gives a stunning performance as Hitler. One can almost imagine how charismatic and appealing he must have been, as he switches from charm to humour to passion as required. A wonderful scene is just before the Nuremberg Rally, where Hitler stands in front of a series of mirrors, practicing his trademark gestures - arms folded, fists clenching - while talking quietly to Speer about the great future ahead of them. The nature of Hitler as a performer and actor has never been shown as clearly. Ian Holm also gives a great performance as Goebbels - repulsive, unshakeably fanatical and cold-blooded, yet also dangerously intelligent and even witty. This is a view of WWII from a particular angle, and it thus has a lot of gaps (for instance, Speer claimed never to have really known what was happening to the Jews) but it is still engrossing and well worth watching.


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