2.8/10
563
16 user 10 critic

Inchon (1981)

During the Korean War, General Douglas MacArthur masterminds the amphibious invasion of Inchon in September 1950.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
5 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Gen. Douglas MacArthur
... Barbara Hallsworth
... Maj. Frank Hallsworth
... Saito-San (as Toshiro Mifune)
... Sgt. Augustus Henderson
... David Feld
... Park (as Nam Goong Won)
... Turkish Brigadier
... Longfellow
... Marguerite
Dorothy James ... Jean MacArthur
... Lim
... Mila
... Gen. Almond (as James Callahan)
Rion Morgan ... Pipe journalist
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Storyline

During the Korean War, General Douglas MacArthur masterminds the amphibious invasion of Inchon in September 1950.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

LOVE. DESTINY. HEROES. War Changes Everything.

Genres:

Drama | History | War

Certificate:

PG
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

|

Release Date:

17 September 1982 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Inchon  »

Filming Locations:

 »

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Box Office

Budget:

$46,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,326,112, 19 September 1982, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$5,200,986
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(edited) | (premiere)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Part of the movie was filmed on board the USS Albany (CG10), at the time the U.S. Sixth Fleet flagship in Gaeta, Italy, using the ship's bridge, especially the helm. The large wheel featured on the bridge was decorative only, not used while the ship was underway. See more »

Goofs

In one scene, a closeup of a digital watch is used to indicate the time. Digital watches were invented 25 years later. See more »

Quotes

[opening title card]
Titles: This is not a documentary of the war in Korea but a dramatized study of the effect of war on a group of people. Where dramatic license has been deemed necessary, the authors have taken advantage of this license to dramatize the subject.
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Crazy Credits

Firm Grip "Fingers" DePalma See more »

Connections

Featured in At the Movies: Stinkers of 1982 (1983) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Major disappointment!
7 July 2003 | by See all my reviews

I never got to see this movie in a theatrical release; I got to see the first part of it cut up for cable TV -- on a cable channel not known for movies. I wanted, honestly, to see a reverential treatment of the UN side of the Korean War, a war whose importance is now greatly underrecognized, and especially of one of the key battles in history. The war was, after all, the first in which the commies did not succeed in turning over a domino, so to speak.

The movie got off to a bad start with one of the actors (Ben Gazzara) launching into a long narrative monologue about the father of General MacArthur while on an airline flight. First of all, General Douglas MacArthur is the key figure of the movie, and his father was already long dead and irrelevant to the plot. Second, the long-winded monologue is not ordinary conversation of the type that one would expect between airline passengers! With the possible exception of university professors who can't be fired and dictators who can't be criticized, nobody gets away with such long-winded, irrelevant, narrative monologues in normal life.

Absurdities pile upon absurdities, and irrelevancies pile upon irrelevancies. Soldiers synchronize watches whose second hands aren't moving, and one gets a closeup of such an action. If you are going to show a close-up of any action, then make it real. Maudlin events at an orphanage take up much footage. Well, the Korean War was a carnage for civilians of all types, wasn't it? Soldiers taking Inchon fail to show fear -- and I can't imagine anyone going behind enemy lines not being scared out of his wits unless a psycho. Taking the lighthouse at Inchon, soldiers notice that the lighting and lens assembly was made in France (anyone who knows anything about lighthouses == and I live in a state that has lots of them -- knows that the lighthouse mechanisms and lenses from about a century ago all came from France).

The best movie about the Korean War remains MASH, and it centers upon support units. The brilliant invasion of central Korea at Inchon deserves far better treatment than this quicksand.


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