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Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1980s: Jessica Lange, Olympia Dukakis, Dianne Wiest … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1980s: Jessica Lange, Olympia Dukakis, Dianne Wiest … ? [Poll]
The Best Supporting Actress Oscar winners of the 1980s include both well-known leading ladies and beloved veteran actresses. The decade saw stars like Jessica Lange, Geena Davis and Anjelica Huston earn their Oscars, joining Mary Steenburgen, Dianne Wiest, Linda Hunt, Olympia Dukakis and Brenda Fricker, who have all had solid careers since their wins. The decade also has two winning actresses that have since died, Maureen Stapleton and Peggy Ashcroft, though their performances will not be forgotten.

Who is your favorite Best Supporting Actress winner of the 1980s? Look back on each and vote in our poll below.

Mary Steenburgen, “Melvin and Howard” (1980) — The decade started off with Steenburgen winning her Oscar for “Melvin and Howard,” about Melvin Dummar (Paul Le Mat), who claimed to be the heir of Howard Hughes‘ fortune. Steenburgen plays Lynda, Melvin’s wife who takes up stripping and is frustrated by Melvin’s behavior. This
See full article at Gold Derby »

Reflecting on Meryl Streep’s record 21 Oscar nominations and celebrating her 3 wins (to date)

Reflecting on Meryl Streep’s record 21 Oscar nominations and celebrating her 3 wins (to date)
Over the past month, the Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars has looked back at Meryl Streep’s 21 Oscar nominations, including her 2018 bid for “The Post.” We have considered the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

For a film buff and awards season aficionado, there is perhaps no more exhilarating a journey than going back to revisit all 21 Streep performances that brought her to the Oscars, plus her competition over the years – a grand total of 105 performances, most richly deserving of their recognition.

While Streep has three Academy Awards — for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979), “Sophie’s Choice” (1982) and “The Iron Lady” (2011) — a case could surely be made that she has deserved even more. She is at her career-best in “The Bridges of Madison County” (1995) and, if not for the juggernaut that was Shirley MacLaine in “Terms of Endearment
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1990s: Jessica Lange, Frances McDormand, Holly Hunter … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1990s: Jessica Lange, Frances McDormand, Holly Hunter … ? [Poll]
The Best Actress Oscar winners of the 1990s have all had long careers of success in Hollywood to varying degrees. From overdue actresses finally getting their first statue like Susan Sarandon to younger talent like Gwyneth Paltrow, the decade is full of diverse performances. Now, two decades later, which do you think holds up as the top Best Actress performance of the ’90s?

Take a look back on each winning performance and make sure to vote in our poll at the bottom. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Actress.)

Kathy Bates, “Misery” (1990) — Kathy Bates in “Misery” is a great example of an actress breaking through in an unconventional way. Playing Annie Wilkes, deranged fan of an author who tortures him mercilessly, Bates became one of few actresses to win for a pure horror movie. She would later earn supporting nominations for “Primary Colors” (1998) and “About Schmidt” (2002).

SEEOscar snub explained: Did ‘Three
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Signs of the Times: Inside 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri'

Signs of the Times: Inside 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri'
Martin McDonagh can't recall exactly where he was when he first saw the signs. The 47-year-old award-winning playwright and filmmaker thinks it might have been Florida. Maybe it was Georgia. Or possibly Alabama or even Mississippi; the bus he was on hit all of them on its route, so he can't be 100-percent sure. Back in the late Nineties and the mid-aughts, McDonagh always liked to take cars or trains or buses when he had to get from one place to the next in the U.S., if time allowed; having grown up in London,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Wonder Woman’ Actress Connie Nielsen Talks About Her Early Roles

‘Wonder Woman’ Actress Connie Nielsen Talks About Her Early Roles
Connie Nielsen is no stranger to playing royalty. The Danish actress got her big U.S. break portraying Lucilla, daughter of the emperor, in 2000’s “Gladiator,” which won the best picture Oscar. And this year she played warrior queen Hippolyta in “Wonder Woman,” a role she revisits in “Justice League,” which opens Nov. 17.

Nielsen was born in Denmark, where she began acting while a teenager. Variety first mentioned her on April 5, 1993, when she co-starred with Rutger Hauer, Eric Roberts and Karen Allen in the made-for-tv thriller “Voyage,” which told the story of two couples alone at sea.

She’s returning to her roots for the Danish television series “Liberty,” based on Jakob Ejersbo’s novel, which revolves around the lives of two young men in Tanzania and their hopes of emigrating to Europe even as corruption among aid organizations threatens the lives of those in developing nations.

How did the landscape of the film industry when you
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Terrifying True Story Behind That Lobotomy Reference in Mindhunter

Image Source: Netflix In the second episode of Mindhunter, FBI special agent Holden Ford goes to visit incarcerated serial killer Edmund Kemper III, hoping the criminal will talk to him about his background, crimes, and motives, as a way to understand what makes "sequence killers" tick ("serial killer" was not yet a term used by law enforcement). Kemper refers to his killings as a "vocation," which Ford takes issue with, but Kemper argues that it's a bit more involved than a simple hobby. "Look at the consequences. The stakes are very high," says Kemper, who then suggests that since psychological help "didn't take" when he was in a mental institution as a young man, perhaps a lobotomy is the answer. In case you're not familiar, a lobotomy is a surgical procedure that involves cutting the connections to the prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain responsible for "executive function," which
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Mindhunter: The Tragic Story Behind That Frances Farmer Reference

Frances Farmer in Ebb Tide, 1937 In the first few episodes of Netflix's new drama Mindhunter, FBI special agent Holden Ford (and later his partner, Bill Tench) repeatedly visits incarcerated murderer Edmund Kemper III, aka the Co-ed Killer. During one visit, Kemper suggests that he be given a lobotomy to help curb his murderous urges. He cites the case of actress Frances Farmer, whom he says was lobotomized in the 1950s. In case you're wondering what that was all about, here's a quick primer. Farmer appeared in over a dozen feature films between 1936 and 1942. But in 1943, she was diagnosed paranoid schizophrenic and was eventually committed to Western State Hospital in Washington state for five years. During her time there, Farmer alleged that she underwent many abuses, including sexual assault, which were chronicled in William Arnold's 1978 book, Shadowland. The book also claimed that Farmer underwent a lobotomy. RelatedMindhunter: the Identity of
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities
Triumph over adversity is drama defined, and Oscar nominations often go to actors whose characters find victory over physical or mental afflictions. The earliest example goes back to 1947; that was the year that non-pro Harold Russell won Best Supporting Actor and a special award for “The Best Years of Our Lives.” Russell was a WWII veteran who lost both of his hands while making a training film. Of note: Of the 59, 27 of these nominations went on to a win. This year’s roster of stars playing afflicted characters includes Jake Gyllenhaal as bombing victim Jeff Baumer in “Stronger,” Andrew Garfield as polio survivor Robin Cavendish in “Breathe,” Bryan Cranston as a millionaire quadriplegic in “The Upside,” and Sally Hawkins in two roles, as an arthritic painter in “Maudie” and a mute lab worker in “The Shape of Water.”

Check out Oscar’s rather astonishing legacy of afflicted contenders below.

Blind
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities

  • Indiewire
Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities
Triumph over adversity is drama defined, and Oscar nominations often go to actors whose characters find victory over physical or mental afflictions. The earliest example goes back to 1947; that was the year that non-pro Harold Russell won Best Supporting Actor and a special award for “The Best Years of Our Lives.” Russell was a WWII veteran who lost both of his hands while making a training film. Of note: Of the 59, 27 of these nominations went on to a win. This year’s roster of stars playing afflicted characters includes Jake Gyllenhaal as bombing victim Jeff Baumer in “Stronger,” Andrew Garfield as polio survivor Robin Cavendish in “Breathe,” Bryan Cranston as a millionaire quadriplegic in “The Upside,” and Sally Hawkins in two roles, as an arthritic painter in “Maudie” and a mute lab worker in “The Shape of Water.”

Check out Oscar’s rather astonishing legacy of afflicted contenders below.

Blind
See full article at Indiewire »

BAMcinématek to honour Sam Shepard by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-09-14 17:11:47

BAMcinématek pays screen tribute to Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright - True West: Sam Shepard on Film Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Sam Shepard, who died on July 27, 2017 at the age of 73, will be honored by BAMcinématek in New York with True West: Sam Shepard on Film.

Wim Wenders' Don’t Come Knocking and Paris, Texas (BAFTA Best Adapted Screenplay nomination for Shepard); Philip Kaufman's The Right Stuff (Best Actor in a Supporting Role Oscar nomination for Shepard's portrayal of Chuck Yeager); Graeme Clifford's Frances; Daniel Petrie's Resurrection; Terrence Malick's Days Of Heaven; Michelangelo Antonioni's Zabriskie Point, co-written by Shepard; Robert Altman's adaptation of Fool For Love; Robert Frank's Me And My Brother (text by Shepard, poems by Allen Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky); Shirley Clarke's video of Shepard's Tongues performed by Joseph Chaikin, and Far North, directed by Sam Shepard will be screened.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jessica Lange, who’s at the height of powers at age 68, revealing depths of emotion as fading Golden Age star Joan Crawford in FX’s mighty Emmy contender “Feud: Bette and Joan.”

Bottom Line: Jessica Lange has matured from a gorgeous movie ingenue to a theater and screen character actress with extraordinary range who keeps surprising audiences with what she can make them feel.

Career Peaks: From the start, Lange impressed people even when she was in the clutches of the Dino De Laurentiis incarnation of “Kong Kong.” She followed that up with her performance as a sexy waitress who seduces Jack Nicholson on a kitchen table in Bob Rafelson’s “The Postman Always Rings Twice” (1981) and with a weighty dramatic role as the depressed
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jessica Lange, who’s at the height of powers at age 68, revealing depths of emotion as fading Golden Age star Joan Crawford in FX’s mighty Emmy contender “Feud: Bette and Joan.”

Bottom Line: Jessica Lange has matured from a gorgeous movie ingenue to a theater and screen character actress with extraordinary range who keeps surprising audiences with what she can make them feel.

Career Peaks: From the start, Lange impressed people even when she was in the clutches of the Dino De Laurentiis incarnation of “Kong Kong.” She followed that up with her performance as a sexy waitress who seduces Jack Nicholson on a kitchen table in Bob Rafelson’s “The Postman Always Rings Twice” (1981) and with a weighty dramatic role as the depressed
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers Sam Shepard

Chicago – He was a true renaissance man, but his unassuming persona would conceal that lofty designation. Sam Shepard was a playwright, actor, author, screenwriter and director of countless important stage and screen works. Shepard died on July 27th, 2017, of complications due to Lou Gehrig’s Disease (Als). He was 73.

Sam Shepard, American Storyteller

Photo credit: File Photo

He was born Samuel Shepard Rogers III in Fort Sheridan, Illinois, and graduated high school in California. After a brief stint in college, he started his career in a traveling theater repertory company. After landing in New York City, he dropped the Rogers from his name and began to work Off Broadway. He won six Obie Awards for his stage writing, and began his screen career by penning “Me and My Brother” (1968) and “Zabriskie Point” (1970). His had a love connection with rocker Patti Smith, which led to the collaborative play “Cowboy Mouth” (1971). He
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Sam Shepard Revealed He Was Engaged to Jessica Lange — and How His 'Bad Behaviors' Ruined The Romance — in Letters

Sam Shepard Revealed He Was Engaged to Jessica Lange — and How His 'Bad Behaviors' Ruined The Romance — in Letters
In letters to a friend over the years, the late Sam Shepard wrote about his tumultuous romance with Jessica Lange — revealing that he once proposed to her in the “corniest way possible” but that his “horrible bouts of drinking & bad behaviors” eventually led to their breakup almost 30 years later. He also wrote about the “terrible sadness” that consumed him after he left his first wife and son for the actress.

The actor, author and playwright, who died last Thursday at 73 of complications from Als, opened up to his friend Johnny Dark in a series of letters — starting in 1972 and ending
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

An Appreciation of Sam Shepard: A Countercultural Playwright Who Became, as an Actor, an Ironic Icon

An Appreciation of Sam Shepard: A Countercultural Playwright Who Became, as an Actor, an Ironic Icon
There’s a grand irony to the life and career of Sam Shepard, who died Thursday at 73, that couldn’t have been lost on him. In the late ’60s and early ’70s, when he was first coming up as a playwright, he was part of a shaggy experimental New York theater scene, a kind of loose downtown collective that emerged from the dead flowers of the counterculture and grew into something else: a hazy ’70s druggie/poet garden of indolent creativity. It was an off-Broadway, off-kilter, semi-off-the-grid scene that sprouted up through the cracks of what had been hippie culture and would soon become punk.

Shepard wrote his plays with a wild-dog discursive freedom that would have been unimaginable before the ’60s, and his fabled romantic affair with a singer-poet named Patti Smith seemed baptized in a kind of bohemian purity. At that point, he’d already begun to flirt with Hollywood, though
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Remembering Sam Shepard and Jessica Lange's 30-Year Hollywood Love Story

  • Popsugar
Remembering Sam Shepard and Jessica Lange's 30-Year Hollywood Love Story
Sam Shepard died at age 73 this week, and in addition to an incredible Hollywood legacy, the actor also left behind his three children: Jesse, 47, from his marriage to O-Lan Jones; and Hannah, 31, and Samuel, 30, from his longtime relationship with Jessica Lange. While Jessica and Sam never got married, their romance was one of Hollywood's longest-lasting love stories. The pair first met on the set of Frances in 1982 and started dating shortly after. They went on to have two children before splitting in 2009. Even after they parted ways, they weren't shy about opening up to the media. In 2010, Sam talked about their "tumultuous" relationship, and Jessica mentioned her ex during an interview with Aarp magazine shortly before his death. "I wouldn't call Sammy easygoing and funny," she told the publication. "But everybody has their dark side, and he always does it with a sense of humor." As we mourn the loss of the beloved actor,
See full article at Popsugar »

Playwright, actor Sam Shepard dies aged 73

Playwright, actor Sam Shepard dies aged 73
Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and actor who suffered from Als died at his home.

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and Oscar-nominated actor Sam Shepard has died from Als. He was 73.

Shepard died on July 27 at his home in Kentucky surrounded by family. “The family requests privacy at this difficult time,” Chris Boneau, the spokesman for the family, said.

Shephard won the Pulitzer Prize in 1979 for his play Buried Child and received a best supporting actor Oscar nomination for his role as Chuck Yeager in The Right Stuff.

His final on-screen appearance came in 2015 on the Netflix drama Bloodline. As an actor his screen credits include Days Of Heaven, Resurrection, Frances, Country, Fool For Love, Crimes Of The Heart, Baby Boom, Steel Magnolias, Bright Angel, Defenseless, Hamlet, The Notebook, Black Hawk Down, The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford, Brothers, Mud, August: Osage County, Cold in July, Midnight Special, In Dubious Battle, and You Were
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Inside Sam Shepard and Jessica Lange's 'Tumultuous' Relationship: 'An Incredible Match, but ... Not Without Fireworks'

Inside Sam Shepard and Jessica Lange's 'Tumultuous' Relationship: 'An Incredible Match, but ... Not Without Fireworks'
Jessica Lange and Sam Shepard had one of the most prolific Hollywood relationships – but it wasn’t always easy.

Shepard, who died of complication from Als last Thursday at age 73, and Lange, 68, first met on the set of the film Frances and started dating in 1982. They went on to have two children – Hannah Jane and Samuel Walker, born in 1985 and 1987

Though their relationship lasted almost three decades, they were both often honest about the hardships they faced together. The actor and playwright opened up to The Guardian in 2010 about how they maintained their “tumultuous” relationship.

“I mean, we have long periods of relative calm.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Sam Shepard, Pulitzer-Winning Playwright and Celebrated Actor, Dies at 73

Sam Shepard, Pulitzer-Winning Playwright and Celebrated Actor, Dies at 73
Sam Shepard, the acclaimed playwright who was also praised as an actor, screenwriter, and director, has died. He was 73.

He died on Thursday at his home in Kentucky following complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, a family spokesman confirmed to Variety.

Known for writing that suffused the fringes of American society with a surreal and brutal poetry, Shepard rose to fame when he won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979 for his play “Buried Child.” He was also nominated for an Academy Award in the supporting actor category for his part in the 1983 film “The Right Stuff.”

He wrote or co-wrote screenplays for Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas,” Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Zabriskie Point,” and Robert Altman’s “Fool for Love,” based on his play.

Shepard was one of the leading figures of the Off Off Broadway movement that flourished in downtown New York beginning in the early 1960s. His
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Sam Shepard, Pulitzer-Winning Playwright and Celebrated Actor, Dies at 73

Sam Shepard, Pulitzer-Winning Playwright and Celebrated Actor, Dies at 73
Sam Shepard, the acclaimed playwright who was also praised as an actor, screenwriter, and director, has died. He was 73.

He died on Thursday at his home in Kentucky following complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, a family spokesman confirmed to Variety.

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Known for writing that suffused the fringes of American society with a surreal and brutal poetry, Shepard rose to fame when he won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979 for his play “Buried Child.” He was also nominated for an Academy Award in the supporting actor category for his part in the 1983 film “The Right Stuff.”

He wrote or co-wrote screenplays for Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas,” Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Zabriskie Point,” and Robert Altman’s “Fool for Love,” based on his play.

Shepard was one of the leading figures of the Off Off Broadway movement that flourished in downtown New York beginning in the early
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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