Evil Under the Sun (1982) - News Poster

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We're Getting More Branagh Poirot!

Chris here. Has everyone caught up to Murder on the Orient Express yet? For yours truly, it was set exactly in the spot in Europe that Clueless said we might be "whelmed" and our Eric Blume felt the same. But that hasn't stopped audiences from turning it into a modest hit, resulting in a global take of over $150 million - and that's enough for Fox to officially kick off a mini-franchise.

The new Agatha Christie Poirot films are keeping in line with the adaptations of the 70s, so next up will be Death on the Nile - expect Evil Under the Sun afterwards should Nile be a success too. Branagh is expected to return as director and star, and Orient Express's screenwriter Michael Green will be back as well. Get ready for more CGI exotic locales and modes of transportation because this one is set on a steamboat in Egypt.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Guy Hamilton, James Bond Director, Passes Away at 93

Guy Hamilton, James Bond Director, Passes Away at 93
Guy Hamilton, who directed four James Bond movies including the 1964 classic Goldfinger, passed away earlier today at the age of 93. The filmmaker died on the Spanish island of Majorca where he lived. No details about the cause of death were given at this time, but we'll be sure to keep you posted with more updates as soon as they come in.

Guy Hamilton was born September 16, 1922 in Paris, France, and he got his start in the film business in the late 1940s. He served as director Carol Reed's assistant for five years, before becoming an assistant director on his 1949 classic film The Third Man. He also served as an assistant director on The Angel With the Trumpet, The Great Manhunt, Outcast of the Islands and the John Huston classic The African Queen, before making his directorial debut in 1951 with The Ringer.

He went on to direct An Inspector Calls,
See full article at MovieWeb »

James Bond director Guy Hamilton dies, aged 93

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Guy Hamilton, who transformed James Bond, dies at the age of 93.

Guy Hamilton, best known for the his work on the James Bond movies, Goldfinger, Diamonds are Forever, Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun, has died at the Hospital Juaneda Miramar in the city of Palma de Mallorca on the Spanish island of Mallorca. He was 93.

Hamilton raised the profile of the James Bond movies through his work with original film 007 actor Sean Connery and Roger Moore, who played the spy starting with Live and Let Die and in 1974's The Man with the Golden Gun, which Hamilton directed.

"Incredibly, incredibly saddened to hear the wonderful director Guy Hamilton has gone to the great cutting room in the sky. 2016 is horrid," Moore wrote on Twitter.

Hamilton worked with Michael Caine on Battle of Britain and Harrison Ford on the 1978 adaptation of Force 10 from Navarone.
See full article at Den of Geek »

R.I.P. Guy Hamilton

British filmmaker Guy Hamilton has died in Majorca at the age of 93. Hamilton set the template for the James Bond franchise when he helmed 1964's iconic "Goldfinger".

He returned to the franchise in the early 1970s for Sean Connery's final outing with "Diamonds are Forever," and then ushered in Roger Moore's start to the series with "Live and Let Die" and "The Man with the Golden Gun".

In a statement, Bond series producers Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson say: "We mourn the loss of our dear friend Guy Hamilton who firmly distilled the Bond formula in his much celebrated direction of 'Goldfinger' and continued to entertain audiences with 'Diamonds Are Forever,' 'Live and Let Die' and 'The Man with the Golden Gun.' We celebrate his enormous contribution to the Bond films."

Hamilton's work stretched far beyond Bond as well including directing "Funeral in Berlin,
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Guy Hamilton Dead At Age 93; Directed Four James Bond Films And "Battle Of Britain".

  • CinemaRetro
Guy Hamilton and Roger Moore on the set of "The Man With the Golden Gun" in Thailand, 1974.

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Cinema Retro mourns the loss of director Guy Hamilton, who has passed away at age 93. Guy was an old friend and supporter of our magazine and a wonderful talent and raconteur. Hamilton, though British by birth, spent much of his life in France. After WWII, he entered the film industry in England and served as assistant director to Sir Carol Reed, working on the classic film "The Third Man". He also served as Ad on John Huston's "The African Queen". Gradually, he moved up the ladder to director and helmed such films as "An Inspector Calls", "The Colditz Story" and "The Devil's Disciple", the latter starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas and Laurence Olivier. In 1964 Hamilton was hired to direct the third James Bond film "Goldfinger" and made cinema history.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

James Bond Director Guy Hamilton Dies at 93

James Bond Director Guy Hamilton Dies at 93
London — Guy Hamilton, the director of four James Bond films, has died on the Mediterranean island of Majorca at the age of 93. Hamilton was at the helm of iconic 007 movies “Goldfinger” in 1964 and “Diamonds are Forever” in 1971, both starring Sean Connery, as well as 1973’s “Live and Let Die” and 1974’s “The Man with the Golden Gun,” both with Roger Moore as Bond.

In a statement, Bond producers Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson told Variety: “We mourn the loss of our dear friend Guy Hamilton who firmly distilled the Bond formula in his much celebrated direction of ‘Goldfinger’ and continued to entertain audiences with ‘Diamonds Are Forever,’ ‘Live and Let Die’ and ‘The Man with the Golden Gun.’ We celebrate his enormous contribution to the Bond films.”

Hamilton’s career started when he was 17 in the accounts department of a film studio in Nice, France, but he soon gravitated to a lowly production role.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The 35 Greatest Murder Mystery Movies Ever Made

Murder mysteries are so commonplace on TV that each week offers seemingly dozens of them on police procedural series and detective shows. But in the movies, whodunits are surprisingly rare, and really good ones rarer still. There's really only a handful of movies that excel in offering the viewer the pleasure of solving the crime along with a charismatic sleuth, often with an all-star cast of suspects hamming it up as they try not to appear guilty.

One of the best was "Murder on the Orient Express," released 40 years ago this week, on November 24, 1974. Like many films adapted from Agatha Christie novels, this one featured an eccentric but meticulous investigator (in this case, Albert Finney as Belgian epicure Hercule Poirot), a glamorous and claustrophobic setting (here, the famous luxury train from Istanbul to Paris), and a tricky murder plot with an outrageous solution. The film won an Oscar for passenger
See full article at Moviefone »

Magic in the Moonlight Review

  • HeyUGuys
Woody Allen’s latest offering is rather a perplexing beast. Packed to bursting point with talent, played out against an exquisite French Riviera backdrop and benefitting from a witty story, it ought to be fabulous. But it isn’t. Instead Magic In The Moonlight – the story of a skeptical magician and an artful clairvoyant – is something of a conjuring act itself. From an amiable muddle of misdirection, Agatha Christie adaptation aesthetic, lopsided performances and grand affectations, the veteran director still somehow extracts a dazzling ending which warrants applause.

World renowned conjuror Wei Ling Soo is better known to his very few friends as Stanley Crawford (Colin Firth) – an opinionated Englishman with a tangible disdain for the weak, gullible and “mentally defective”. Flattered by the extravagant compliments of lifelong friend and fellow illusionist Howard (Simon McBurney) – and abandoning plans to holiday with his pragmatic fiancée Olivia – Stanley agrees to a trip
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Review: The Poirot Collection

Mention the name Hercule Poirot and chances are that the first thing that pops into your mind is David Suchet’s moustachioed visage. Suchet, of course, portrayed Agatha Christie’s famous Belgian export for 24 years, from 1989 to 2013, during which time he starred in every major Poirot story that the author wrote. As great as these televisual treats were, though, I have very fond memories of the trio of Poirot movies that are included in this new Blu-ray collection.

Though I never saw them at the cinema, Murder On The Orient Express (1974), Death On The Nile (1978) and Evil Under The Sun (1982) always seemed to crop up on television whenever there was a Bank Holiday (on rotation with The Great Escape (1963) among others) and guaranteed that we as a family would sit together, glued to the screen, no matter how many times we’d seen them.

The first of these three movies,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

The Poirot Collection: Blu-ray box set

(Sidney Lumet, John Guillermin, Guy Hamilton, 1974-82; StudioCanal, PG)

The production partnership of John Brabourne (the Eton-educated seventh Baron Brabourne) and Richard B Goodwin (who started out as a teenage tea boy with the Rank Organisation) is one of the most interesting in the British cinema. Its highlights include David Lean's A Passage to India and the two-part Little Dorrit, but its most popular works were the period Agatha Christie pictures that brought all-star casting and unfashionably high production values to the whodunit and set new standards for the string of TV productions that followed. Brabourne's father-in-law Lord Mountbatten helped secure the rights from Dame Agatha, and the three best are the Hercule Poirot mysteries in this Blu-ray set. Ustinov plays the Belgian sleuth both in John Guillermin's Death on the Nile (1978), scripted by Anthony Shaffer and superbly photographed by Jack Cardiff, and in Guy Hamilton's bland
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Blu-ray Review - The Poirot Collection

Paul Risker reviews The Poirot Collection, consisting of Murder on the Orient Express, Death on the Nile and Evil Under the Sun...

From Ealing to Poirot by way of The Wicker Man, the Studiocanal back catalogue is filled to the brim with classic films that serve our home entertainment adventures of discovery and rediscovery. Now with the release of The Poirot Collection that brings together the three feature films of Murder on the Orient Express, Death on the Nile and Evil Under the Sun, a glorious Blu-Ray warmth is offered to the crime aficionado during these winter months.

One of the icons of detective literature and television, Hercule Poirot first emerged from the imagination of the English writer Agatha Christie, before Albert Finney, Peter Ustinov and David Suchet introduced her creation to the screen. Between them they have imbued Poirot with a Shakespearean presence; each interpretation an individual joy to watch,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Blu-ray Review: The Poirot Collection (rerelease)

  • CineVue
★★★☆☆Hercule Poirot has been a mainstay on British television screens over the past quarter of a century thanks to David Suchet's definitive portrayal of the portly Belgian sleuth. Courtesy of UK distributors StudioCanal, three of the great detective's most widely watched feature-length cases are now available on Blu-ray in a new box set - entitled The Poirot Collection - featuring Albert Finney's Academy Award-nominated turn in Murder on the Orient Express (1974) and two of Peter Ustinov's appearances as Agatha Christie's flatfoot in which he encounters Death on the Nile (1978) and Evil Under the Sun (1982).
See full article at CineVue »

Win The Poirot Collection on Blu-ray

  • HeyUGuys
To mark the release of the Poirot Collection on 20th January, we’ve been given 3 copies to give away on Blu-ray.

The collection brings to life three of Agatha Christie’s best-known novels, with Albert Finney marking the beginning of Poirot’s on screen journey along with Ingrid Bergman (Casablanca) who gives an Oscar® winning performance in Murder on the Orient Express. Death on the Nile sees Peter Ustinov step into Finney’s shoes to great acclaim. Four years later, Ustinov reprises the role alongside some of Britain’s best-loved actresses Jane Birkin, Dame Maggie Smith and Diana Rigg in Evil Under the Sun.

Please note: This competition is open to UK residents only

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The Small Print

Open to UK residents only The competition will close 22nd January at 23.59 GMT The winner will be picked at random from entries received No cash alternative is available

The usual
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Doctor Who Recruits The Avengers' Diana Rigg

Doctor Who Recruits The Avengers' Diana Rigg
Doctor Who will hang with one very groovy lady when Dame Diana Rigg aka The Avengers‘ Emma Peel guest-stars on the BBC series next season.

And joining Rigg for her trip with the Time Lord will be her real-life daughter, Rachael Stirling, the BBC reports.

Related | Doctor Who Casts New Companion: Find Out When She’ll Arrive

In an episode filming this week with series star Matt Smith and new companion Jenna-Louise Coleman, Rigg and Stirling will play a Yorkshire local and her daughter, who together share a “dark secret.”

“The first time Rachie and I will be working together
See full article at TVLine.com »

Christopher Challis

Creative cinematographer and a key member of the Powell-Pressburger movie production team

Although the cinematographer Christopher Challis, who has died aged 93, was an essential member of the Archers production company of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, he joined them as director of photography at the time of their decline. However, he worked on more of the great British writing-directing team's films than any other cinematographer. These eccentric, extravagant, intelligent and witty fantasies went against the British realist tradition, allowing more scope for a creative cinematographer such as Challis. The sensuous use of Technicolor and flamboyant sets and designs made them closer to the MGM world of Vincente Minnelli and of Stanley Donen, who used Challis on six of his films.

Perhaps Challis's finest achievement was on Powell and Pressburger's The Tales of Hoffmann (1951) which, as he explained, had "no optical effects or tricks. It was all edited in
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

"Game of Thrones" Recap: "Fire is Power"

This week's Game of Thrones was entitled "The Ghost of Harrenhal", which it turns out is not a Goosebumps episode about a haunted prep school dorm, but rather a reference to the fact that things are about to get real with Arya's new friend in the ruins of ye ole castle.

Let's jump in, shall we?

The late, mediocre Renly Baratheon (Gethin Anthony)

We start off in Renly's well-appointed shabby chic bungalow. Enjoy the view, because it's probably the last we'll see of it! Renly (Gethin Anthony) and Caitlin (Michelle Fairley) agree that despite their various war efforts they can still be BFFs and get their nails done together and go to brunch and talk about boys because Robb has no interest in the Iron Throne - so basically they can continue on the same relationship that Robert and Ned had, which ended So Well For Everyone, right?

Moments after
See full article at The Backlot »

10 Greatest British Ensembles In Film History

With the much anticipated release of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy in theatres today, WhatCulture! were challenged with coming up with our 10 best British ensemble casts. With Tinker’s all star British cast – including the likes of Gary Oldman, Colin Firth, John Hurt, Tom Hardy, Mark Strong and Benedict Cumberbatch – it was a bloody hard challenge to come up with ten that could even come close to rivalling such a solid cast!

Read on to discover what we came up with!

10. Gosford Park (2001)

The murder mystery genre is always one that employs a vast and impressive ensemble cast and Gosford Park is a prime example of how effective a film can be when this is done proficiently. A range of talented British stars fill the screen, disclosing the everyday workings of a 1930s mansion house from the privileged inhabitants and their wealthy guests, right down to the most invisible of servants.
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Top 10 Movie Swashbuckling Pirates

Tomorrow sees the release of the 4th instalment of the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise, On Stranger Tides. The return of Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) is sure to excite cinemagoers – particularly the loins of legions of devoted female fans! – with his distinct droll, ebullient personality and comic timing. He’s the quintessential pirate figure of our generation, glamorising the lifestyle on the high seas!

However, pirates have been a stock character within film industry for as long as cinema has been in existence. The first known pirate feature was a silent 1 reel, short film adaptation of Treasure Island in 1908. Unfortunately, the American Film Institute has deemed the film lost and a copy is extremely unlikely to be in existence any more. As film technology progressed, so did the pirate subgenre of action cinema, with every decade of the 20th and 21st century having at least one major production based
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Agatha Christie: little grey cells and red herrings galore

There's much to enjoy in Agatha Christie. Here's a selection of five of her best moments

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926)

Although it's widely viewed as her masterpiece, the critics initially accused Christie of not playing fair. Breaking previous rules of detective fiction, the novel sees Hercule Poirot investigate Ackroyd's murder and slowly and spectacularly unravelling the mystery of the suicide of the woman Ackroyd loved. We won't spoil the twist for you.

The Body in the Library (1942)

"You've been dreaming, Dolly," Colonel Bantry tells his wife. "Bodies are always being found in libraries in books. I've never known a case in real life." Christie wrote in her foreword to this Miss Marple mystery that she wanted to do a variation on a well-known theme, with "a highly orthodox and conventional library" but "a wildly improbable and highly sensational body". She provides the reader with red herrings galore before Marple works out whodunnit.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Agatha Christie: little grey cells and red herrings galore

There's much to enjoy in Agatha Christie. Here's a selection of five of her best moments

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926)

Although it's widely viewed as her masterpiece, the critics initially accused Christie of not playing fair. Breaking previous rules of detective fiction, the novel sees Hercule Poirot investigate Ackroyd's murder and slowly and spectacularly unravelling the mystery of the suicide of the woman Ackroyd loved. We won't spoil the twist for you.

The Body in the Library (1942)

"You've been dreaming, Dolly," Colonel Bantry tells his wife. "Bodies are always being found in libraries in books. I've never known a case in real life." Christie wrote in her foreword to this Miss Marple mystery that she wanted to do a variation on a well-known theme, with "a highly orthodox and conventional library" but "a wildly improbable and highly sensational body". She provides the reader with red herrings galore before Marple works out whodunnit.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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