6.8/10
6,846
67 user 62 critic

Eating Raoul (1982)

R | | Comedy, Crime | 24 March 1982 (USA)
Trailer
1:36 | Trailer
A relatively boring Los Angeles couple discovers a bizarre, if not murderous, way to get funding for opening a restaurant.

Director:

Paul Bartel
2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Paul Bartel ... Paul Bland
Mary Woronov ... Mary Bland
Robert Beltran ... Raoul Mendoza
Susan Saiger ... Doris the Dominatrix / Nurse Sally Cummings
Lynn Hobart Lynn Hobart ... Lady Customer
Richard Paul ... Mr. Cray - Liquor Store Owner
Mark Woods Mark Woods ... Hold-up Man
John Shearin ... Mr. Baker - the Horny Patient
Darcy Pulliam Darcy Pulliam ... Nurse Sheila
Ben Haller Ben Haller ... Dewey
Roberta Spero Roberta Spero ... Swinger
Vernon Demetrius Vernon Demetrius ... Swinger
Arlene Harris Arlene Harris ... Swinger
Buster Wilson Buster Wilson ... Swinger
Marta Fergusson Marta Fergusson ... Swinger
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Storyline

When a Paul enters his apartment to find Mary fighting off a swinger who has gotten into the wrong apartement (and thinks that Mary is just playing hard to get) he hits the man with a frying pan, killing him. Their dreams of running a small resturant seem to be in jeopardy until they decide to dispose of the body, keep the wallet, and to advertise for other sexually oriented visitors who are summarily killed, bagged, robbed and disposed of. This goes along quite well until one night a burglar named Raoul breaks in and cuts himself in for a piece of the action. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A tasty comedy of bad manners. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Crime

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The business card of "Doris the Dominatrix" (Nurse Sally Cummings Susan Saiger) read: "Discipline mild or severe as you require. Call for an appointment". See more »

Goofs

When Mary goes to meet the bank officer, she is wearing dark underwear (visible through her sheer dress). But when she arrives home later, still wearing the dress, the underwear is white. See more »

Quotes

Paul: Mary, I just killed a man.
Mary: He was a man. Now he's just a bag of garbage.
See more »

Crazy Credits

A Sister To The Director..... Wendy Bartel See more »

Connections

Referenced in Valley Girl (1983) See more »

Soundtracks

Love's Meditation
(uncredited)
Music by Roger Roger
Thomas J. Valentino Music Inc
See more »

User Reviews

 
Irony this PURE...
6 April 2000 | by alice liddellSee all my reviews

With filmmakers so cynical and despairing today about America, it's refreshing to see a film with so much faith in the American dream. This is a classic tale of rags to riches, of a respectable married couple, down on their financial luck, who, with initiative and a novel idea, manage to fulfil their dream, a hotel in the country. If, to get there, they must pose as bondage merchants, murder their clients, rob their wallets, give the bodies to a petty thief who sells them to dog-food companies as choice meat, than such is the nature of success.

RAOUL declares itself as a true story from the Sodom and Gomorrhah of Hollywood, where fantastic wealth co-exists with degrading poverty. The film is a moral tale, about steering the middle-course, about what it takes to be normal and decent. It plays like straight John Waters, but just as hysterical, even if, eventually, it cannot sustain itself.

The featured couple are called, appropriately, the Blands, and it is significant that their serial-killing weopon is a lethal frying-pan. Paul, played by the director, is the epitome of his name: balding, pedanctic, so obsessed with fine wines that he gets fired from his low-rent off-licence for over-ambition. His wife, Mary, is less bland, which is why she is more easily tempted by the dark side. While Paul remains sweetly virginal, she, a hospital nutritionist, works in an evnironment where she is continually harrassed by lecherous lotharios, and is knowledgeable enough to know that the most humiliating revenge is to have them receive their enema from a burly dandy.

Bartel is a Roger Corman alumnus, and this can be seen in the fluid, economical filming, the functional set-ups that are actually quite complex. The film's very classical structure is at odds with (piecemeal) filming that has characters seem, ineptly, to wander up to the camera, although this has the unsettling effect of making the creepy nonsense seem curiously real.

There is also a hint of suppressed Gothic in the telling - Mary's hysterical normality is so camp she could be Vampira - while the Blands' blandness is under attack from all sides. It's bad enough to have 'swingers' (a charmingly 50s word for perverts that chimes with the Blands' adorably tasteless 50s furniture left them by Mary's mother until she dies) crowding the tenement for sleazy, Warholian, sado-masochistic parties, but to have one of them storm into your apartment, throw up all over your carpet, nearly die in your lavatory, bring your husband to the party to be humiliated/initiated by Doris the Dominatrix, and then come back to violate your wife, is an imposition.

The film makes satirical points enough - the rich and professional classes are all vile, violent sleazes, while the S&M 'sickos' are sweet, loving mothers who live in pleasant suburban avenues so indifferent to capitalist Darwinism that they help out the competition. The racism needed to keep normality normal is shown in the horrifyingly hilarious shooting of a store-robber, or in the final fate of self-confessed 'Chicano' Raoul, which suggest Peter Greenaway might be a fan of the film. The cannibalism theme has a long satirical history in jibes on the bourgeoisie, and it's no surprise to learn that Bartel is a devotee of Bunuel.

But the film's real satire is to show how normality must survive in a society, Hollywood, that has obliterated any recognised sense of reality.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

24 March 1982 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Eating Raoul See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$350,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (DVD)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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