E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) - News Poster

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Henry Thomas on Life After 'E.T.' — "It's Hard When You're Remembered for an Iconic Role" (Exclusive)

Childhood star Henry Thomas has come full circle. When he wasn't becoming famous as Elliott in the 1982 classic E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial and other films, he grew up quietly on a farm in South Texas. Nearly four decades later, he moved to a farm of his own, this time in Oregon with his third wife, Anna, 46, and three kids: Hazel, 14, Evelyn, 9, and Henry III, 8. "That was always my goal. We have horses, and apples, and horse apples," Henry, 46, exclusively tells Closer Weekly, laughing. He's also achieved adult success with films like Legends of the Fall. "It's hard when you’re remembered for an iconic role," he says. "But I’m in an industry where in order to get a job, I have to go into a room and get either rejected or accepted. If you have a thin skin, you just won’t last very long." Henry in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Steven Spielberg Reveals That E.T. Started as a Story About His Parents' Divorce

Steven Spielberg Reveals That E.T. Started as a Story About His Parents' Divorce
James Cameron is taking viewers behind some of the world’s most famous science fiction stories.

The Avatar director’s upcoming six-part television series, AMC Visionaries: James Cameron’s Story of Science Fiction, will explore the genre’s roots through interviews with A-list actors and storytellers who have defined the field. In a clip shared exclusively with People, Cameron sits down with director Steven Spielberg to talk the origins of his hit film, 1982’s E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.

Close Encounters [of the Third Kind] led to E.T., which I think of as Close Encounters 2,” Cameron, 63, says in the clip before Spielberg, 71, interjects, “I think of it the same way.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘Ready Player One’ Surpasses $500 Million at Worldwide Box Office

  • The Wrap
‘Ready Player One’ Surpasses $500 Million at Worldwide Box Office
Steven Spielberg’s “Ready Player One” has crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office, Warner Bros. announced Saturday.

Domestically, the film has hit $120.6 million to date since its opening on March 29. Internationally, the film has grossed $379.5 million, earning more than $200 million in China alone.

Also Read: Steven Spielberg Is Back! 'Ready Player One' Scores His Best Box Office Debut in a Decade

“Ready Player One” stars Tye Sheridan, Olivia Cooke, Ben Mendelsohn, Lena Waithe, T.J. Miller, Mark Rylance and Simon Pegg.

Spielberg directed “Ready Player One” from a screenplay by Zak Penn and Ernest Cline, based on the latter’s novel of the same name. Donald De Line, Kristie Macosko Krieger, Dan Farah and Spielberg produced. Adam Somner, Daniel Lupi, Chris DeFaria and Bruce Berman served as executive producers.

Also Read: Steven Spielberg Becomes First Director to Top $10 Billion at Worldwide Box Office

The film follows a young man who lives in a dystopian future where almost everyone escapes their horrid reality through a virtual world called the Oasis. With the help of his friends, he sets out to complete a quest created by the Oasis’ late creator before the head of an evil corporation can finish it and take over the virtual system.

Earlier this week, Spielberg became the first director to ever gross more than $10 billion at the worldwide box office, with “Ready Player One” becoming his highest-grossing film in the last decade and nudging him into eight figures in all-time career grosses.

Spielberg’s all-time top performer was 1993’s “Jurassic Park,” which grossed $983.8 million worldwide. That was followed by 2008’s critically reviled “Indiana Jones and the Temple of the Crystal Skull” ($786.6 million) and the 1982 classic “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,” which earned $717 million — without adjusting for inflation.

Read original story ‘Ready Player One’ Surpasses $500 Million at Worldwide Box Office At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Steven Spielberg Is First Director to Cross $10B at the Box Office

Steven Spielberg Is First Director to Cross $10B at the Box Office
Steven Spielberg is far and away, financially speaking, the most successful director of all time. Thanks to the success of Ready Player One at the box office, Spielberg's movies have now grossed over $10 billion worldwide. He's the first director to accomplish this feat and nobody else is even close. So, not only is he one of the most beloved and respected directors to ever do it, he's quantifiably one of the most successful.

Ready Player One, which is based on the novel of the same name by Ernest Cline, has grossed $474.8 million worldwide so far. That has helped push Steven Spielberg's body of work to $10.009 billion. In total, there are 27 movies that make up this impressive figure, dating back to 1989's Always, which is his lowest-grossing effort to date with $74.1 million. Spielberg also has his recent Oscar-favorite The Post to thank for pushing him past this landmark, as that movie brought in $174.4 million worldwide.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Review: Spielberg's 'Ready Player One' is a World of Pure Imagination

In a legendary career spanning more than four decades, Steven Spielberg changed the film industry with his influential science fiction and adventure movies. Timeless films, such as Jaws (1975), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982), and Jurassic Park (1993), are revered as archetypes of contemporary Hollywood escapist cinema. Along with other pop culture touchstones of the era, like Star Wars (1977) and Superman: The Motion Picture (1978), Spielberg's movies paved the way for the massive blockbusters that now dominate the box office year-round. With his new film, the unabashedly entertaining Ready Player One, Spielberg adapts author Ernie Cline's NY Times bestseller, a love letter to the 1980s that would not exist without the director's unparalleled output. Set in the year 2045 - the world is a harsh place, beset by unemployment, poverty, overcrowding, and utter hopelessness. 18-year-old Wade Watts (Tye Sheridan of Mud and X-Men: Apocalypse) lives
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Steven Spielberg Says He Will Never Digitally Enhance or Change His Old Movies Again

Remember that time when Steven Spielberg digitally altered E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial for the re-release of the film? And while you were watching it you noticed that he had digitally removed the guns from the FBI a replaced them with walkie-talkies? Yeah... he'll never do that again!

During the Ready Player One press event, someone asked Spielberg if he would ever consider going back to one of his old movies and digitally alter it again. As you know, this is something George Lucas loved to do with his original Star Wars films. You don't have to worry about Spielberg ever doing it again, though. He learned his lesson. This is what he had to say thanks to /Film:

"When E.T. was re-released, I actually digitized five shots where E.T. went from being a puppet to a digital puppet. And I also replaced the gun when the FBI runs up
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Drew Barrymore Reveals Her Daughters Want to Be Actresses: "They've Got the Barrymore Gene!"

Just like their mama! In a new interview, Drew Barrymore revealed her two young daughters, Olive, 5, and Frankie, 3, already want to become actresses. "All they want to do is get onstage. They’ve got the Barrymore gene! We went to The Sound of Music, they’re like, 'I just want up on the stage.' We go to the Amazing Bubble Show, they’re like, 'I just want on the stage,'" Drew, 43, gushed. Drew herself comes from a Hollywood dynasty family and has been acting her entire life — her first major film role was in 1982's E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial when she was seven years old — but that doesn't mean she wants her girls to be performers, too. "As of today, I would say Olive is a vet and Frankie’s a ballerina," the proud mom told Savannah Guthrie on Tuesday, March 20's Today broadcast. #sisters #myhappyplace #mywholeworld A post
See full article at Closer Weekly »

‘I Can Only Imagine’ Directors Join Spielberg, Zemeckis, and More as Filmmakers With Two A+ CinemaScores

Hollywood is still bonkers for metrics — there’s Rotten Tomatoes to freshen up, IMDb stars to earn, Metacritic rankings to top, and the audience-friendly classic CinemaScore, which provides a handy letter grade at the end of opening weekend for each big-screen release. It’s designed to be as easily digested as an elementary school report card, but CinemaScores don’t measure quality. By their own admission, they measure “movie appeal,” and high grades often reflect canny marketing or audiences already primed to enjoy a certain film.

This weekend, moviegoers rated two new openers, the gay teen romance “Love, Simon” and the faith-based drama “I Can Only Imagine,” the highest CinemaScore possible: a sterling A+. And while it’s telling that this weekend spawned such high marks for such very different films, it also speaks to what happens when Hollywood churns out the films that certain audiences are so eager to see.
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars 2018: Will ‘Dunkirk’ be the 17th film to sweep the sound categories?

Oscars 2018: Will ‘Dunkirk’ be the 17th film to sweep the sound categories?
In the audio categories at the Oscars, Best Sound Editing and Best Sound Mixing, typically the loudest film wins. So there’s one film this year that was almost tailor-made to sweep those prizes: Christopher Nolan’s WWII drama “Dunkirk.” Should the film sweep it would be the second Nolan film to do so and the 17th overall.

The Best Sound Mixing and Best Sound Editing categories have gone through a lot of transformations at the Oscars over the years, at least in how they’re classified. The Oscars first started handing out one award for a film’s audio, Best Sound Recording, in 1929 with “The Big House” taking the inaugural award. Then the category became Best Sound in 1958 with the musical “South Pacific” becoming the first winner under that name. And finally it became Best Sound Mixing in 2003 with “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” taking home the first prize.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Drew Barrymore Opens Up About Motherhood And Growing Up In Show Business

Drew Barrymore is looking back at her time growing up in Hollywood and becoming a mother. Related: Drew Barrymore And Timothy Olyphant Help Pull Off Romantic Netflix Proposal The 43-year-old actress had her first breakout role at only age 7 in 1982’s “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial”. And in a new interview with InStyle, Barrymore recalls her youth in show business, including being legally emancipated from […]
See full article at ET Canada »

"Lost In Space: The Complete John Williams Collection" On Vinyl

  • CinemaRetro
By Darren Allison

Before inheriting the title "Master of Disaster", a perfectly justified honour for his reputation of creating some of the greatest disaster movies of the 1970s, Irwin Allen was also the man responsible for some of the classic TV shows to emerge in the 1960’s. Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, The Time Tunnel, and Land of the Giants have all survived the test of time and become immortalised among the best in terms of cultural importance. However, above all others, Lost in Space (1965-1968) is arguably the series that endured. Very loosely inspired by Johan David Wyss's classic 1812 adventure novel “Swiss Family Robinson”, the premise for the show was fairly uncomplicated and followed the adventures of the Robinson family, a crew of space colonists who encounter a number of strange and otherworldly situations after their ship is sabotaged and thrown off its original course. A great
See full article at CinemaRetro »

'Close Encounters' at 40: How Spielberg Made Sci-Fi's Mothership Connection

'Close Encounters' at 40: How Spielberg Made Sci-Fi's Mothership Connection
How do you follow up a record-breaking blockbuster about a killer shark? For starters, you get out of the ocean. And then maybe you look up.

A longtime watcher of the skies, young Steven Spielberg had already been kicking around an idea involving alien visitation, spacecraft "sightings" and government cover-ups – some sort of story, in the gentleman's own words, about "UFOs and Watergate" – before he had started turning Peter Benchley's novel Jaws into a movie. One three-men-and-an-apex-predator hit later, he was a hot Hollywood director who had folks ready
See full article at Rolling Stone »

'Close Encounters' at 40: How Spielberg Made Sci-Fi's Mothership Connection

'Close Encounters' at 40: How Spielberg Made Sci-Fi's Mothership Connection
How do you follow up a record-breaking blockbuster about a killer shark? For starters, you get out of the ocean. And then maybe you look up.

A longtime watcher of the skies, young Steven Spielberg had already been kicking around an idea involving alien visitation, spacecraft "sightings" and government cover-ups – some sort of story, in the gentleman's own words, about "UFOs and Watergate" – before he had started turning Peter Benchley's novel Jaws into a movie. One three-men-and-an-apex-predator hit later, he was a hot Hollywood director who had folks ready
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Steven Spielberg Saved Gizmo, Got Yelled at by Kathleen Kennedy Over ‘E.T.’

  • Slash Film
Steven Spielberg Saved Gizmo, Got Yelled at by Kathleen Kennedy Over ‘E.T.’
Steven Spielberg shows no signs of slowing down. The 70-year-old filmmaker will be delivering the excellent The Post to theaters this month and releasing his pop culture extravaganza Ready Player One in 2018. But just because Spielberg seems to be constantly plowing ahead into the future, that doesn’t mean we can’t stop and reflect on his past. […]

The post Steven Spielberg Saved Gizmo, Got Yelled at by Kathleen Kennedy Over ‘E.T.’ appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

With a ‘Film Stars’ Song in Contention, Rock Star Elvis Costello Reflects on Moonlighting for the Movies

With a ‘Film Stars’ Song in Contention, Rock Star Elvis Costello Reflects on Moonlighting for the Movies
Elvis Costello wrote the closing song for the new movie “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,” but it’s a classic from his own canon that director Paul McGuigan planted as an Easter egg for music buffs. Costello’s “Pump It Up” is heard early on in the film to establish the late ’70s time frame, right before a scene that has the American actress Gloria Grahame (played by Annette Bening) meeting her younger Liverpudlian boyfriend (Jamie Bell) for the first time. Just after “Pump It Up” is heard on the soundtrack, the two lovers-to-be dance to “Boogie Oogie Oogie” — a cheeky nod to one of the silliest awards upsets of all time, when the ephemeral disco group A Taste of Honey famously beat Costello for the best new artist Grammy.

“You know what? It didn’t register,” admits Costello, who didn’t get the embedded joke when he first saw the film, and whom the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Critics Pick Steven Spielberg’s Best Movies — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
Film Critics Pick Steven Spielberg’s Best Movies — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Post,” which is set to hit theaters on December 20th, what is Steven Spielberg’s best film?

Candice Frederick (@ReelTalker), Freelance for Harper’s Bazaar, /Film, The Undefeated, Birth.Movies.Death

E.T.” There is really no other filmmaker who portrays wonder and innocence quite like Spielberg. While he’s done many great movies, “E.T.” not only captures the purity and curiosity of youth, but its beautiful effects and simple observations implore all of us to stop and take notice of the world around us and humanity itself.

Read More: ‘The Post’ Review: Steven Spielberg’s Spectacularly Entertaining Journalism Thriller Is a
See full article at Indiewire »

10 Raiders of the Lost Ark Facts You Never Knew

10 Raiders of the Lost Ark Facts You Never Knew
The movie that started a second successful franchise for Star Wars star Harrison Ford is also one of the greatest films ever made. We all know the whip, the Fedora, the wisecracks, the bad guys, the ex girlfriend, the snakes, and the melting face. Here we look at 10 things you never new About Indiana Jones and Raiders of the Lost Ark.

His name is Indiana but he was born in a different state.

His nickname may be Indiana, but Doctor Jones originated in a different state altogether: Hawaii! Longtime pals George Lucas and Steven Spielberg were on vacation when they kicked around the idea for Raiders of the Lost Ark, a swashbuckling homage to the old movie serials that also inspired Star Wars. Spielberg was thinking of maybe directing a Bond film, but made Raiders instead.

Who else could have worn that fedora?

Steven Spielberg wanted Harrison Ford pretty early in the process,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Steven Spielberg Says Kathleen Kennedy Called Out His “Unacceptable Behavior” On The Set Of ‘E.T.’

One of the common defenses aired by older men accused of sexual harassment, or even assault, is that their behavior was the style at the time. It’s not a particularly compelling argument; all they had to do was be somewhat aware or actually care about the discomfort of those around them. Or, in the case of Steven Spielberg, listen when someone calls them out for being bad (it should be clear, the filmmaker never harassed or assaulted anyone — he was just kind of a jerk).

Continue reading Steven Spielberg Says Kathleen Kennedy Called Out His “Unacceptable Behavior” On The Set Of ‘E.T.’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Logan,’ and More: the Genre-Benders That Are Major Oscar Contenders

  • Indiewire
‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Logan,’ and More: the Genre-Benders That Are Major Oscar Contenders
Every year, the studios take their best genre successes and try to push them beyond the technical ghetto. Oscar campaigners want to convince critics, guilds, and Oscar voters that their movie rises to the level of art. But it’s rare for fantasy, horror, thriller, action or comic-book movies to pass over to the Best Picture side.

When they do, it tends to be an exception like Peter Jackson’s fantasy trilogy “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy. All three films scored Best Picture nominations and technical wins: “Fellowship” scored 13 nominations and wins for Makeup, Visual Effects, and Cinematography; “The Two Towers” earned six and won Sound Editing and VFX; and then came the ultimate triumph for the finale “The Return of the King”: a grand sweep of all 11 nominations including Best Picture. But while “Lotr” fell into the fantasy genre, it was boosted by the literary pedigree of J.R.R. Tolkien.
See full article at Indiewire »

Recommended New Books on Filmmaking: ‘Blade Runner 2049,’ Francis Ford Coppola, David Bowie & More

It’s been a stellar year of cinema and pop culture-themed books, and the texts (and Blu-rays) in this round-up all make fine gifts. One additional book that should be on your year-end list is Mark Frost’s Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier. It’s a satisfying companion to season three of Peaks, not to mention Frost’s own Secret History of Twin Peaks. So be sure to check out Nick Newman’s recent interview with the Peaks co-creator.

Live Cinema and Its Techniques by Francis Ford Coppola (Liveright)

The legendary Francis Ford Coppola has spoken of “live cinema” with regularity over the years, specifically with respect to 1981’s One From the Heart. That film, a box office flop now held in some regard, is an essential part of Live Cinema and Its Techniques, a fascinating new book authored by Coppola himself. The lessons from that experience, Coppola says,
See full article at The Film Stage »
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