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Mickey Rourke to Produce, Star in Crime Drama ‘Twilight Into Darkness’

  • Variety
Mickey Rourke to Produce, Star in Crime Drama ‘Twilight Into Darkness’
Mickey Rourke will produce and star in the independent crime drama “Twilight Into Darkness,” Variety has learned exclusively.

Rourke will portray a detective who becomes obsessed with finding and stopping a child murderer while searching for his own redemption. Rourke and Brian Metcalf are both producing under Rourke’s Ruby Baby Limited production company alongside Metcalf’s Black Jellybeans Productions. Metcalf is directing from his own screenplay.

Principal photography is slated to begin next year. “Twilight Into Darkness” will be the second collaboration for Metcalf and Rourke. Metcalf recently directed Rourke in the drama film “Adverse,” which co-starred Penelope Ann Miller, Sean Astin, Lou Diamond Phillips, and Thomas Ian Nicholas.

“I had a wonderful time working with the innovative, talented director Brian Metcalf,” said Rourke. “The young man has incredible integrity and vision. He has gained my respect.”

Rourke won a Golden Globe and Spirit Award for his role in
See full article at Variety »

Film News Roundup: Ben Foster to Star in Boxing Drama ‘Harry Haft,’ Barry Levinson to Direct

  • Variety
Film News Roundup: Ben Foster to Star in Boxing Drama ‘Harry Haft,’ Barry Levinson to Direct
In today’s film news roundup, Ben Foster is playing a boxer, Corbin Bernsen will portray a real estate developer and vampire fantasy “Empire V” is selling at Afm.

Castings

Ben Foster has signed on to star in boxing drama “Harry Haft” with Barry Levinson directing. Bron Studios and New Mandate Films are producing in association with Creative Wealth Media, which is financing the film.

Levinson is directing and producing from a screenplay by Justine Juel Gillmer, based on the novel “Harry Haft: Survivor of Auschwitz, Challenger of Rocky Marciano” by Alan Scott Haft. The film is set post-World War II and will star Foster as Harry Haft, a boxer who fought fellow prisoners in the concentration camps to survive. Haunted by the memories and his guilt, he attempts to use high-profile fights against boxing legends like Rocky Marciano as a way to find his first love again.

Besides Levinson,
See full article at Variety »

Film Review: ‘Cruise’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Cruise’
“Cruise,” written and directed by Robert Siegel, is its own intoxicating brand of youth nostalgia film. It’s set in the outer boroughs of New York in 1987, and it’s every bit as fresh and authentic about the period as a movie like “Adventureland” was — it gets the big hair and the bangles, the mall-boutique “street” fashions and greasy-synth-pop optimism, the whole dressed-in-attitude vibe of kids who’ve had five years of MTV to model themselves on. But “Cruise” also feels like a 1980s movie. That may sound like a contradiction in terms: How can an ’80s nostalgia film be authentic if it’s also mining our affectionate kitsch memories of what the ’80s looked like at the multiplex?

The reason it’s not a contradiction is that Siegel, who wrote the superb screenplays for “The Wrestler” and “The Founder,” isn’t interested in microwaving John Hughes tropes. He has
See full article at Variety »

Erika Henningsen Takes 'Mean Girls' — And Us — To Broadway (Exclusive)

Standing ovations are certainly nothing new when it comes to Broadway productions (the cast and crew would really have to screw up not to get one), but there was something a little extraordinary about the one that greeted a recent performance of the musical Mean Girls at the August Wilson Theatre. The energy and the enthusiasm from the audience seemed a little overwhelming, which immediately begs the question: what is it like to be on the receiving end of that kind of response? "I have to say, my favorite part in the show is the last 10 minutes," replies Erika Henningsen, who plays nice girl gone mean, but eventually redeemed, Cady Heron. "There are days when I think, 'Oh my God, I don't have the energy to do this.' It becomes such a marathon, but then in the last 10 minutes I get to speak to the cast — the full cast — in that Spring Fling number.
See full article at Life and Style »

Barry Levinson movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Rain Man,’ ‘Diner,’ ‘The Natural’

  • Gold Derby
Barry Levinson movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Rain Man,’ ‘Diner,’ ‘The Natural’
Barry Levinson just received his 10th and 11th Emmy nominations for producing and directing the HBO drama “Paterno” which was the true story of how the Penn State football coach handled child abuse allegations against one of his employees. Levinson has picked up Emmy nominations for producing, writing and directing in the past, winning four times in his career.

Levinson began his career as a comedy writer on various variety shows in the 1970s ultimately landing a steady job writing for 72 episodes of “The Carol Burnett Show.” When that show ended he began writing screenplays and had a remarkably successful run co-writing two Mel Brooks movies — “Silent Movie” and “High Anxiety” — as well as two acclaimed dramas “Inside Moves” and “and Justice for All.” He would receive his first Oscar nomination for the screenplay of “And Justice for All.”

That success led Levinson to a feature film directing career. His semi-autobiographical film “Diner,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Barry Levinson movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Barry Levinson movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Barry Levinson just received his 10th and 11th Emmy nominations for producing and directing the HBO drama “Paterno” which was the true story of how the Penn State football coach handled child abuse allegations against one of his employees. Levinson has picked up Emmy nominations for producing, writing and directing in the past, winning four times in his career.

Levinson began his career as a comedy writer on various variety shows in the 1970s ultimately landing a steady job writing for 72 episodes of “The Carol Burnett Show.” When that show ended he began writing screenplays and had a remarkably successful run co-writing two Mel Brooks movies — “Silent Movie” and “High Anxiety” — as well as two acclaimed dramas “Inside Moves” and “and Justice for All.” He would receive his first Oscar nomination for the screenplay of “And Justice for All.”

That success led Levinson to a feature film directing career. His semi-autobiographical film “Diner,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Barry Levinson: The Oscar-Winning Director Who Decades Ago Saw TV’s Peak Potential and Trump-like Danger

Barry Levinson: The Oscar-Winning Director Who Decades Ago Saw TV’s Peak Potential and Trump-like Danger
This weekend, Academy Award-winning director Barry Levinson (“Rain Man”) will be honored with the Crystal Globe for outstanding artistic contribution to world cinema at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival in the Czech Republic. Levinson’s feature filmmaking career has been long and varied, having started with writing for Mel Brooks before directing movies that ranged from the personal (“Diner”) to Robin Williams comedies to Oscar-nominated dramas to prescient political satires and Al Pacino-starring biopics (“Paterno” “You Don’t Know Jack”).

Hollywood no longer makes the type of mid-budget, theatrically released feature films Levinson became known for, but he doesn’t share many of his contemporaries’ dismay about the industry’s significant shift toward TV and streaming. A decade before “The Sopranos” and “The Wire” helped usher in the current “Peak TV” wave, Levinson and his Baltimore Pictures was responsible for introducing then-reporter David Simon to TV with “Homicide: Life on the Street
See full article at Indiewire »

Levinson honour in Karlovy Vary by Richard Mowe - 2018-05-24 09:34:36

Part of the Barry Levinson tribute in Karlovy Vary: Kathy Baker and Al Pacino portray Sue and Joe Paterno in a scene from Paterno, about the late disgraced football coach Photo: Film Servis Festival Karlovy Vary

Barry Levinson: Crystal Globe for Outstanding Contribution to World Cinema Photo: Film Servis Kviff In the grand tradition of the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (29 June to 7 July) of honouring key figures, Oscar winning writer, producer and director Barry Levinson will receive a Crystal Globe for Outstanding Contribution to World Cinema.

The honour marks the 30th anniversary of the Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise tour de force Rain Man for which Levinson won an Academy Award as well as being the recipient of five Oscar nominations. He follows in the wake of the likes of William Friedkin, Jerry Schatzberg and the combo of Ken Loach and Paul Laverty last year.

Levinson started as a
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Karlovy Vary Film Festival to honour 'Rain Man' director Barry Levinson

Levinson will accept the Crystal Globe for outstanding artistic contribution to world cinema.

Karlovy Vary Film Festival (Kviff) will honour Oscar-winning director Barry Levinson as part of its 53rd edition this summer.

Levinson, who won the Academy Award for best director for Rain Man in 1989, will accept the Crystal Globe for outstanding artistic contribution to world cinema.

He is also known for films such as his directorial debut Diner, Good Morning, Vietnam with Robin Williams and 10-time Oscar-nominated Bugsy.

Rain Man and Levinson’s 1998 political satire Wag The Dog will both screen at the festival, with introductions from the director.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Barry Levinson to Be Feted at Karlovy Vary Film Festival

  • Variety
Barry Levinson to Be Feted at Karlovy Vary Film Festival
Writer-director-producer Barry Levinson, who will screen his HBO-produced account of the Penn State sex-abuse scandal “Paterno” at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival, will be honored with the Crystal Globe for outstanding artistic contribution to world cinema, the organization announced Wednesday.

At the fest, which launches its 53rd edition in the Czech Republic’s historic spa town June 29, Levinson will also introduce his Oscar-winning 1988 Dustin Hoffman-starrer “Rain Man” and 1998’s “Wag the Dog.” The impact of Levinson’s screenwriting, including 1970s TV hits and breakout courtroom drama “…And Justice for All,” will be celebrated along with his directorial work, which launched with 1982’s “Diner” and carried on with “The Natural,” “Good Morning, Vietnam,” “Avalon” and “Bugsy.”

Karlovy Vary said that Levinson’s producing work, backing directors from Mike Newell (“Donnie Brasco”) to Neil Labute (“Possession”), has made his influence on cinema comparable with that of William Friedkin, Jerry Schatzberg,
See full article at Variety »

Christopher Walken, Hugh Hudson, Barry Levinson Look Back at Careers at R7al

  • Variety
Christopher Walken, Hugh Hudson, Barry Levinson Look Back at Careers at R7al
R7al, a new film event in Lausanne, Switzerland, dedicated to classic films, wrapped Wednesday, with Christopher Walken receiving an honory award onstage, and one of his films, Abel Ferrara’s “The Funeral,” playing as the closing night movie.

Among the other guests were directors Darren Aronofsky, Barry Levinson, Thomas Vinterberg, Susanne Bier, Michel Hazanavicius, Hugh Hudson and Tim Pope, composer Alexandre Desplat, Cannes festival director Thierry Fremaux, author Stephen Apkon, and actresses Lea Seydoux, Rossy De Palma and Fanny Ardant. The event was founded by actor Vincent Perez.

R7al screened 40 films as well as staging a multitude of discussions during which filmmakers could talk about their work.

At a screening of “The Deer Hunter,” Walken explained that two weeks before filming started director Michael Cimino brought together the principal actors at the film’s first location, Cleveland, Ohio, to get to know each other. “We spent at least 10 days together.
See full article at Variety »

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]
The 1980s at the Oscars were full of matches between Best Picture and Best Director. Of the 10 Best Director winners, eight of their films won Best Picture, including Robert Redford, Richard Attenborough, James L. Brooks, Milos Forman, Sydney Pollack, Oliver Stone, Bernardo Bertolucci and Barry Levinson. The only instances of a Picture/Director split were in 1981 when Warren Beatty won for “Reds” and 1989 when Stone won his second directing Oscar for “Born on the Fourth of July.”

So who is your favorite Best Director winner of the ’80s? Look back on each of their wins and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Robert Redford, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Redford’s directorial debut proved he had the chops, winning for the harrowing domestic drama “Ordinary People.” Redford’s other Oscar nominations were for “The Sting” (1973) in Best Actor and both Best Picture and Best Director for “Quiz Show” (1994).

SEEDirector Ava DuVernay
See full article at Gold Derby »

Ellen Barkin: ‘Never Get Into an Elevator Alone With Terry Gilliam’

Ellen Barkin: ‘Never Get Into an Elevator Alone With Terry Gilliam’
Terry Gilliam’s decision to refer to #MeToo as being run by “mob rule” continues to go poorly for the Monty Python member and filmmaker, who compared the anti–sexual harassment movement to a group of people “carrying their torches and they are going to burn down Frankenstein’s castle.” After being criticized by the likes of Sarah Silverman and Judd Apatow, he’s received fierce pushback from Ellen Barkin, who tweeted, “My hard won advice: never get into an elevator alone with terry gilliam.”

Barkin, who worked with Gilliam on “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” is also well known for her performances in “Diner,” “Ocean’s Thirteen,” and the TV adaptation of “Animal Kingdom.” She also tweeted that Gilliam is “is the last man to admonish a movement that is trying to protect women from abusive men. #MeToo” and “Terry Gilliam, you talk too much” in response to his interview.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Shape Of Water Takes Home Best Picture At The 90th Academy Awards

The Academy celebrated its 90th birthday on Sunday evening in style. Filled with montages of both classic and recent films, this year’s Oscars, hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, was infused with the right mix of humor that had a more relaxed and natural tone. Inclusion was the highlight of the evening and many of the acceptance speeches continued to raise attention to the Time’s Up and Me Too movements, immigrants and minorities.

Best Picture went to The Shape Of Water. The fantasy film also saw Oscars for director Guillermo del Toro, production design and original score.

Check out the full list of winners below and what the winners told the press backstage.

Best motion picture of the year

The Shape of Water” (Fox Searchlight) A Double Dare You Production Guillermo del Toro and J. Miles Dale, Producers. On setting the film in Baltimore, de Toro said, “You know, I
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sarah Jessica Parker on the Lessons She Learned from Her Ill-Fated Romance with Robert Downey Jr.

Sarah Jessica Parker on the Lessons She Learned from Her Ill-Fated Romance with Robert Downey Jr.
Before she met her husband Matthew Broderick, Sarah Jessica Parker had another significant relationship with a Hollywood heavyweight: Robert Downey Jr..

The duo were together from 1984-91, and covering this week’s issue of People, Parker, 52, opens up about the relationship — as well as marriage, motherhood and four decades of fame.

The actress says she learned a valuable lesson from her romance with Downey Jr., 52, who has spoken openly about struggling with addiction before he got sober in 2002.

“I learned how to take care of myself,” she says. “There was a huge amount of time spent making sure he was okay.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The lost sequel to Good Morning Vietnam

Simon Brew Feb 5, 2018

Robin Williams was set to star in a follow-up to his breakthrough hit, Good Morning Vietnam. And it was fully written, too...

The 1987 comedy-drama Good Morning, Vietnam was a very unconventional hit movie. A war film, and a hugely comedic one, it remains most remembered, not unfairly, for being the breakout movie role for Robin Williams, seizing his moment and his day with incredible impact.

Williams, by this stage of his career, was already hugely popular on television, courtesy of Mork & Mindy. But the genesis of the movie that would ignite his film career actually lay back to even before then, in 1979. That’s when the real-life Adrian Cronauer, on whose story the film is based, pitched a sitcom based around his experiences as DJ in the Vietnam War. It got the interest of agent Larry Brezner, who bought an option on the story. But television networks
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Top Five Paul Reiser Movie Roles of His Career

Born on March 30, 1957, Paul Reiser is an American television personality, musician, comedian, actor and author. Paul is best known for different appearances in top rated movies and TV shows. He began his career as a stand-up comedian and after developing skills in comedy, he got his first breakout film role. In 1982, he was assigned a role in the film Diner (directed by Barry Levinson) where he would feature as a closet stand-up comedian. With this appearance, his ability was brought to the attention of Hollywood. His career continued to grow in film and so far he has

The Top Five Paul Reiser Movie Roles of His Career
See full article at TVovermind.com »

‘Stranger Things’ is Best When Using its Movie Homages as Red Herrings

Paul Reiser isn’t the most identifiable ’80s figure in “Stranger Things.” The future “Mad About You” star saw solid hits during the decade in “Diner,” “My Two Dads,” and two “Beverly Hills Cop” movies, and he has been headlining another ’80s-set modern TV series for the past three years (the criminally under-appreciated “Red Oaks”). But he’s no Winona Ryder. He might even slip behind “Goonies” star Sean Astin in the Reagan-era power rankings. It’s doubtful fans were as excited about seeing Reiser as they were when his character, Dr. Sam Owens, offers Will Byers Reese’s Pieces.

Yet when it comes to homages within “Stranger Things,” few are as integral to the story as recognizing Paul Reiser as the bad guy from “Aliens.” Many have noted the superficial similarities between the characters, but it’s important to note why this casting works beyond a fun homage. It’s beneficial to the story,
See full article at Indiewire »

Spotted: Your Favorite '90s Star in Stranger Things Season 2

Image Source: Netflix You may have noticed that a couple of stars from the '80s and '90s joined Stranger Things season two. First there's Sean Astin, of The Goonies and Rudy fame, as Bob the Brain. The second is Will's doctor at the Department of Energy. Dr. Owens is played by prolific comedian Paul Reiser. This 60-year-old New Yorker got his big break in entertainment in the 1982 Barry Levinson film Diner, which costars Kevin Bacon, Tim Daly, Steve Guttenberg, Mickey Rourke, and Daniel Stern. (It's worth a watch if you ever get a chance.) RelatedHas Stranger Things Already Started Planning Season 3? Here's What We Know After appearing in the first two Beverly Hills Cop films, Reiser landed one of the starring roles on the NBC sitcom My Two Dads opposite Greg Evigan and Staci Keanan. If you're the right age (like I am), you were a huge fan
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Judd Apatow interview: The Big Sick

Matt Edwards Jul 28, 2017

Judd Apatow chats to us about The Big Sick, directing, stand-up comics and bad interviews...

Heading into UK cinemas this week, The Big Sick is a reinvigorating romantic comedy. It has a brilliant cast of characters, a unique pitch (boy meets girl, boy loses girl, awkward situations and a medically induced coma ensue) and a balance of drama and comedy that means you never know whether to brace yourself for a broken heart or split sides. A breath of fresh air, it’s the sort of film regular cinema goers need. It’s also the sort of film that needs regular cinema goers; it needs those that see it and enjoy it to shout about it, to tell people that it’s worth paying attention to.

Directed by Michael Showalter, the film stars Kumail Nanjiani, who co-wrote the script with his real life spouse Emily V. Gordon
See full article at Den of Geek »
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