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Blade Runner (1982)

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A blade runner must pursue and terminate four replicants who stole a ship in space, and have returned to Earth to find their creator.

Director:

Ridley Scott

Writers:

Hampton Fancher (screenplay), David Webb Peoples (screenplay) (as David Peoples) | 1 more credit »
Popularity
259 ( 5)

Remembering Rutger Hauer (1944-2019)

We celebrate the life and legacy of Rutger Hauer, the award-winning actor best known for Blade Runner and The Hitcher.

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Top Rated Movies #169 | Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 12 wins & 16 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Harrison Ford ... Rick Deckard
Rutger Hauer ... Roy Batty
Sean Young ... Rachael
Edward James Olmos ... Gaff
M. Emmet Walsh ... Bryant
Daryl Hannah ... Pris
William Sanderson ... J.F. Sebastian
Brion James ... Leon Kowalski
Joe Turkel ... Dr. Eldon Tyrell
Joanna Cassidy ... Zhora
James Hong ... Hannibal Chew
Morgan Paull ... Holden
Kevin Thompson ... Bear
John Edward Allen John Edward Allen ... Kaiser
Hy Pyke ... Taffey Lewis
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Storyline

In the 21st century, a corporation develops human clones to be used as slaves in colonies outside the Earth, identified as replicants. In 2019, a former police officer is hired to hunt down a fugitive group of clones living undercover in Los Angeles. Written by MadMovieManiac

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A chilling, bold, mesmerizing, futuristic detective thriller. See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Release Date:

25 June 1982 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Dangerous Days See more »

Filming Locations:

London, England, UK See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$28,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,150,002, 27 June 1982

Gross USA:

$32,868,943

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$41,671,264
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Workprint Version)

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)| Dolby Stereo (35 mm prints)| 12-Track Digital Sound (IMAX 12 .0 Surround)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Ridley Scott is pretty confident that Blade Runner was the first of its kind stating that he looked at "all the other" urban-set sci-fi films and they just weren't very good. "They either suffered from a lack of budget or a lack of imagination or a lack of reality." See more »

Goofs

(at around 17 mins) When Deckard approaches Tyrell's office in the spinner, the sun is out of frame in the sky, indicating that it's late morning. But when he enters the office, the sun is just below the tip of an angled building indicating early morning. As the scene progresses through about five minutes, the sun progresses normally upward past the tip of the building until the window is darkened. After a time-lapse during which Deckard asks Rachael over 100 lengthy questions involving narrative responses, she walks out of the room and we see the sun is barely out of frame again, indicating that about another five minutes have passed. Not nearly enough time to ask or answer 100 questions. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Female announcer over intercom: Next subject: Kowalski, Leon. Engineer, waste disposal. File section: New employee, six days.
See more »

Crazy Credits

In the "happy ending" Theatrical/International cuts, the credits play over the gorgeous scenery. In later Director/Final cuts, they play over a normal black background. See more »

Alternate Versions

A 113 minute 70mm workprint was shown at the some sneak previews in Dallas and Denver in 1982. The film scored extremely poorly from the test audiences, and it was this poor reaction which led to the happy ending and the voice-over narration. In 1989, sound preservationist Michael Arick came across a 70mm print of Blade Runner in the TODD-AO vaults. Thinking it was the International Cut, Arick purchased the print for Warners, who loaned it out to the Los Angeles Cineplex-Odeon Fairfax Theatre in 1990 for a festival of 70mm prints. It was at this screening that people realized they were watching the Dallas/Denver Workprint. The film was subsequently screened at UCLA's Los Angeles Perspectives Multimedia Festival in 1991. A 35mm reduction of this version was later shown at the NuArt Theatre and the Art Deco Castro Theater in San Francisco in 1991. It was the success of these four screenings that prompted Warner Bros. to look into the possibility of releasing a Director's Cut of the film. The workprint briefly resurfaced again, by accident, for a one-week engagement (1/15 - 1/21) at the Seattle, WA Landmark Egyptian Theater in 1999. However, this print was the one-of-a-kind 70mm blow-up, directly from the Warner Bros. vault. In 2007, the workprint was made available to the public for the first time on disc 5 of the 5-disc Ultimate Collector's Edition DVD/HD-DVD/Blu-ray Disc of the film (which also contains the US theatrical cut, the European cut, the Director's Cut and the Final Cut). The differences between the workprint and the other versions include:
  • The logo for the Ladd Company is on a white background, not a black background.
  • The title screen for the film is different, with the words 'BLADE RUNNER' sliding onto the screen accompanied by the sound of knives.
  • New American Dictionary (2016) definition of a replicant is used in lieu of the opening credit crawl.
  • The opening shots do not include the close-up and subsequent pull-away from the eye seen in all other cuts, it simply cuts closer and closer to the Tyrell building. Additionally, the shot moving into towards the window is absent, as are two interior wide shots of Holden standing at the window. Throughout the scene, air-traffic control headings can be heard.
  • After Leon shoots Holden and he crashes through the wall, hitting the table, the shot stays on Holden as fan blades brush his hair and his back smokes from the gunfire.
  • Deckard's meal at "The White Dragon" can be seen being laid on the bar in front of him, rather than merely being heard. Additionally, the shot of Deckard rubbing his chopsticks together is longer. Also, as Gaff speaks to Deckard, the shot remains on Deckard rather than cutting to Gaff, showing Deckard having some difficulty eating his noodles.
  • As Deckard and Gaff are flying to the police station, in all versions of the film, you can see Gaff speaking to Deckard, but in the Workprint you can actually hear what he says.
  • During the briefing, the shot of Bryant getting a bottle and pouring two drinks is absent. Also missing is Bryant's line "I need the old Blade Runner, I need your magic."
  • Bryant says "two" replicants were fried running through an electric field instead of one."
  • When looking at the incept tapes, Bryant comments on Leon's ability to work all day and night.
  • As Gaff and Deckard approach the Tyrell building, there is more air traffic control heard.
  • When Rachael asks Deckard if she can ask him a personal question, Deckard responds "Sure. What is it?" In all other versions of the film, he simply says "Sure."
  • When Deckard and Gaff inspect Leon's address and the attendant opens the room for them, he mutters "Kowalski".
  • After Chew tells Roy that J.F. Sebastian will take him to Tyrell, the shot where Roy leans forward and says, "Now, where will we find this J.F. Sebastian?" is missing.
  • After Rachael has left Deckard's apartment, and he walks out onto the balcony, there is the sound of a police siren, which is absent in all other cuts.
  • When Deckard plays the piano in a depressed stupor: a) there is no unicorn vision, b) there is no background music, and c) we hear one or two notes Harrison Ford actually played on the set.
  • A whirring sound comes from the Esper that is absent in all other versions.
  • After zooming in on the shot of Roy in the photo, Deckard can be heard to say "Hello Roy." Then, after printing the hardcopy, he says "Zhora or Pris?"
  • When Deckard gives the snake scale to the Cambodian lady, she says "It will take a moment."
  • Deckard's search for Abdul Hassan lasts longer: we see more of Animoid Row and the back streets of the sector. As Deckard moves away from the Cambodian lady, there is an eighteen second crane shot showing Deckard disappearing into the crowd.
  • The dialogue heard during the scene with Hassan matches perfectly with the lip movements.
  • As Deckard nears Taffy Lewis' club, there is a twelve second crane shot showing the geography of the street.
  • There is a shot of two dancers in hockey masks outside Taffy's bar.
  • There is a shot of Deckard asking for directions to Taffy Lewis' from a uniformed policeman.
  • The audio-only introduction of 'Miss Salome' is slightly different.
  • There is a close-up shot of Deckard examining a sequin from Zhora's costume.
  • After Zhora attacks Deckard and flees, we see Deckard loosen his tie from his throat.
  • "If I Didn't Care" by the Ink Spots, is in the background when Deckard purchases a bottle of Tsing Tao, instead of "One More Kiss, Dear."
  • After Rachael shoots Leon, the shot of him falling forward onto Deckard is absent, as is the shot of Rachael lowering the gun and stepping forward.
  • In Deckard's apartment, there is no "Love Theme"; the initial music track merely continues on longer. Also, Rachel plays a different selection on the piano when testing herself, and the shot of her undoing her hair and letting it floor to her shoulders is missing.
  • Roy says to Tyrell, "I want more life, father".
  • When Roy kills Tyrell, the footage is the same as in the International version, showing Roy's thumbs going into Tyrell's eyes and blood spurting out. Additionally, when Roy turns to Sebastian, he says "I'm sorry, Sebastian. Come. Come", as he walks towards him. As Sebastian turns to run, he can be heard whimpering.
  • Bryant's info to Deckard over the CB about Tyrell's and Sebastian's deaths are heard as we see Deckard driving through the tunnel. When Deckard is parked in his sedan on the street, he is merely preparing to call J.F.'s apartment before the police spinner interrogates him. Also, when the spinner arrives, we hear police sirens.
  • During the fight between, Pris and Deckard, we see Pris lift him up by the nostrils.
  • When Deckard shoots Pris, he shoots 3 times instead of 2.
  • There is the sound of a thunderclap as Roy examines Pris' body.
  • We actually see Roy break Deckard's fingers, in a split second close up, with a prop-hand. Also, the shot when Deckard pops his fingers back in is taken from a different angle, and Deckard's scream is much quieter than in all other versions of the film.
  • There are more shots of Roy running through the Bradbury.
  • When Roy pushes his head through the wall, there is an extra line; "You're not in pain are you? Are you in pain?"
  • There are more shots of Deckard as he climbs to the roof, and also more shots of him as he hangs on to the neighboring building.
  • The music during the chase is completely different from the music of Vangelis (according to Paul Sammon, the music used is from old soundtracks by James Horner and Jerry Goldsmith).
  • Different, farther-away shots of Roy as Deckard watches him die. Additionally, there is an alternate narration (the only narration in this version): "I watched him die all night. It was a long, slow thing and he fought it all the way. He never whimpered and he never quit. He took all the time he had as though he loved life very much. Every second of it...even the pain. Then, he was dead."
  • Deckard's movement through his apartment as he searches for Rachael is different, with a wide shot of him scanning the room. The overall scene is approximately 20 seconds shorter than in all other versions
  • The shot of Deckard telling Rachael to wait before leaving the apartment is missing.
  • There is no happy ending, the film ends when the elevator doors slam.
  • There are no end credits, merely exit music for about a minute: the same cue heard as when Gaff takes Deckard to see Bryant at the start of the movie.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in NCIS: Cloak (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

Search For Clues
(uncredited)
By James Horner
[Workprint Cut only]
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

 
An incredibly beautiful-looking film as one would expect with director Ridley Scott…
11 August 2008 | by Nazi_Fighter_DavidSee all my reviews

But it's almost like an art movie, the first science-fiction art film… It's a futuristic film beautifully put together… It's really impeccably made by one of the great visionary directors… And you really saw a future that looked very different from the future you had seen before… A future that looked very believable like the visual-effects shots of the flying car going over a futuristic city… The fight sequence doesn't prepare you for the traumatic emotional side that there is in the film, it leaves you sort of broken…

There is a beautiful, delicate emotional great scene that I remember when I first saw the movie… I'm in the theater and I'm so drawn in what Rutger Hauer's doing… I'm so drawn in by what the theme of the movie has brought us to… The magnificent moment where he is letting go of life… And in those last moments of letting go of life he's really learned to appreciate life to the point where he spares Deckard's life, and where he's even holding a white dove because he just wants to have something that's alive in his hands… It's an amazing sort of crescendo that's going and there's Rutger saying: "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. All these moments will be lost in time like tears in rain." Hauer puts all the things that are so amazing about people: sense of poetry, sense of humor, sense of sexuality, sense of the kid, sense of soul…

Scott brought out the best qualities in his performers… He coaxed and very gently manipulated performances from his actors that in some instances I think they've rarely topped… You feel the story, you feel the emotions of the characters and you will be lost in the middle of this wild world, you know, it's so rich and it's painful… I mean it's a very bluesy, dark story and told very compassionately…

The overpopulation, the sort of crowd scenes is so rich and varied and there's such an extreme detail designing the magazine covers, designing the look of the punks, the Hare Krishnas, the biological salesman, everything is designed… You have just Piccadilly Circus punks walking by… You have a sense of layers in that society… That is one of those things that you see again and again… The city landscape with the big billboards à la Kyoto or Tokyo… Scott was able to create the look based on what goes on in various cities all over the world… Whether it is Tokyo, Kyoto or Beijing or Hong Kong or whatever, you're right in "Blade Runner" country…

"Blade Runner," to me, embodies the elegance, the power, and the uniqueness of a film experience… It's the most classical, beautiful, purest movie-making writing and then the film-making itself is… The images and the sound and the music, it's pure cinema… Ridley came out with an amazing, brilliantly executed future of an absolute dystopia… The intensity of his perfectionism on "Blade Runner" made the movie… This is a master at his best…


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