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St. Elsewhere 

The lives and work of the staff of St. Eligius Hospital, an old and disrespected Boston teaching hospital.
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1988   1987   1986   1985   1984   1983   … See all »
Nominated for 5 Golden Globes. Another 25 wins & 78 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Ed Begley Jr. ...  Dr. Victor Ehrlich 137 episodes, 1982-1988
Howie Mandel ...  Dr. Wayne Fiscus / ... 137 episodes, 1982-1988
David Morse ...  Dr. Jack Morrison 137 episodes, 1982-1988
Christina Pickles ...  Nurse Helen Rosenthal 137 episodes, 1982-1988
William Daniels ...  Dr. Mark Craig 137 episodes, 1982-1988
Denzel Washington ...  Dr. Philip Chandler 137 episodes, 1982-1988
Norman Lloyd ...  Dr. Daniel Auschlander 132 episodes, 1982-1988
Eric Laneuville ...  Luther Hawkins 128 episodes, 1982-1988
Ed Flanders ...  Dr. Donald Westphall / ... 120 episodes, 1982-1988
Stephen Furst ...  Dr. Elliot Axelrod 97 episodes, 1983-1988
Sagan Lewis ...  Dr. Jacqueline Wade 88 episodes, 1982-1988
Bonnie Bartlett ...  Ellen Craig 78 episodes, 1982-1988
Cynthia Sikes ...  Dr. Annie Cavanero 69 episodes, 1982-1987
Mark Harmon ...  Dr. Robert Caldwell 65 episodes, 1983-1987
Jennifer Savidge ...  Nurse Lucy Papandrao 63 episodes, 1982-1988
Terence Knox ...  Dr. Peter White 55 episodes, 1982-1987
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Storyline

This hour-long dramatic series featured life at St. Eligius Hospital, headed by Drs. Donald Westphall and Daniel Auschlander. Every year, new residents would walk down the halls of St. Eligius; learning to deal with perfectionist Cardiovascular Surgeon Mark Craig was only the beginning of the way the hospital and its interesting patients would change their lives forever. Written by Phil Fernando

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

TV-PG
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 October 1982 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

St. Elsewhere See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

MTM Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(137 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Arthur Taxier plays a recurring role as "Dr. Morton Chegley." "Dr. Morton Chegley" was the name of Lloyd Nolan's character on the 70s show Julia (1979). See more »

Goofs

Throughout the series, Dr. Daniel Auschlander suffers from late-stage Liver Cancer and yet he is seen repeatedly as drinking "very good" Scotch after hours with his staff in his office. Alcohol consumption only aggravates Liver Cancer and hastens death. See more »

Quotes

Dr. Mark Craig: [looking at an x-ray] There's a liver not long for this world.
Dr. Daniel Auschlander: It's mine.
See more »

Crazy Credits

In the final season, St. Eligius has been bought by Ecumena. In several episodes of the final season, the following message appears during the end credits: "ECUMENA is a fictional company that does not represent any actual company or corporation." See more »

Alternate Versions

The VHS "Best of St. Elsewhere" version of the final episode, "When the Fat Lady Sings," uses the standard surgical-mask MTM logo for the series, and not the flat-lining kitten logo. See more »

Connections

Featured in TV's Most Censored Moments (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

St. Elsewhere
by Dave Grusin
Opening Theme Song and Closing Theme Song
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

An addictive and well-written show.
11 May 2000 | by Surfer-23See all my reviews

This series concerned St. Eligius, a hospital in a less fashionable section of Boston, and the day-to-day lives of its staff and patients. The institution had acquired its unfortunate nickname from statements made by doctors at other institutions to the effect that, if patients could not afford treatment in a respectable hospital, they would have to go to "St. Elsewhere." Nevertheless, St. Eligius consistently showed itself to be a place full of concerned and highly skilled medical personnel.

The central character was Donald Westphall, the chief of medicine and also the one in charge of the new residents who came in every year (St. Eligius was, among other things, a noted teaching hospital). He was depicted primarily as a caring, understanding, and reserved (even repressed) individual, but he could also be seen slugging it out occasionally with the administration, his residents, and even his colleagues if the situation required it

The other two "old-timers" who were present throughout the run of the series were Daniel Auschlander, the chief of services, who had already been diagnosed with cancer in the first episode but wouldn't seem to die (though he certainly talked about dying enough) and Mark Craig, the brilliant and extremely pompous heart surgeon who always said exactly what was on his mind to everyone, regardless of the reaction it got. Craig`s favorite target by far was young Victor Ehrlich, a tall, blonde California surfer dude who also happened to be a skilled surgeon. Ehrlich, though, was content to good-naturedly absorb the barrage of insults as best he could and go on learning from the master. (Ehrlich, unfortunately, was only slightly more adept than his mentor in interpersonal relations, and his conversations with other residents frequently ended with them telling him, "You're a pig, Ehrlich," and walking off.)

Other main characters in the sizeable cast included people every part of the hospital, from the residents to the regulars at the nurse's stations to people in custodial services to patients to administrators. As in real life, doctors came and went every couple of years, with some making greater impact than others. Indeed, the "star" of the series, David Birney, was gone after a single season. (It should be noted that, though the bulk of the hospital staff consisted of men, there were also women in highly visible and well-thought out roles as well, or were at times anyway.)

"St. Elsewhere" was much more soap opera-like than "Hill Street Blues," and this effectively drew viewers in and kept them in year after year. In the last seasons, there were radical changes in plotline (the hospital was bought by a large corporation, which brought with it brand-new management styles), and the cast seemed to change more frequently. There were also more episodes that tried to stretch beyond the established formula of the series. One flashback episode, for example, showed the young resident Mark Craig sucking up to HIS mentor, which was a delight to watch. The final episode proved to be the most strange and surreal, and left most longtime viewers dumbfounded.

For me, the series was marred slightly by that fact that, as in previous series created by Bruce Paltrow ("Lou Grant" and "The White Shadow"), the producer's politics too often became an integral part of the series. In practically every episode, it seemed, there would be a conversation between a doctor and a patient`s relative in which the latter would inform the physician about the percentage of Americans affected by some unfair law, or the exact number of cases of such-and-such a societal problem that were reported in the previous four fiscal years. The intent was good; had it occurred less frequently, it would have been far less annoying.

When it appears in syndication, "St. Elsewhere" can easily become an addiction, even if you have seen episodes three or four times already. The writing was at a very high level, the characterizations were three-dimensional and complex, and the medical situations intriguing. One becomes very interested in how the characters deal with their problems, and what twists and turns their lives will take. There is sufficient comedy mixed in with the serious plots to allow the easing of your pain after serious conflicts have arisen, and there are even some inside TV jokes thrown in once in a while for those who can catch them. Yes, there is far too much melodrama sometimes, but even that can be fun.

("St. Elsewhere" is often mentioned in the same breath with "Hill Street Blues." They were both hour-long, big-cast dramas of the 1980s, both with several plots going on at the same time, both were made by the same production company, and both were part of the "revitalization" of NBC, which by the end of the decade was not at all the "joke" network it had been ten years before. "St. Elsewhere" and "Hill Street Blues" were fine programs, though "Hill Street" was easily the best drama of the decade.)


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