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Meryl Streep in ‘The French Lieutenant’s Woman’: A look back at her third Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The French Lieutenant’s Woman’: A look back at her third Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 3 of the 21-part Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

After a remarkable year in film in 1979, including her Academy Awards win for “Kramer vs. Kramer,” Meryl Streep took 1980 off from the big screen, instead focusing her energies on a stage musical of “Alice in Wonderland” that premiered at New York’s Public Theater in December 1980. While the production garnered middling notices, Streep received raves.

The following year, Streep not only returned to the screen but took on her first leading role in a screen adaptation of John Fowles‘ acclaimed 1969 novel “The French Lieutenant’s Woman.” Playwright Harold Pinter adapted the book for the screen and British filmmaker Karel Reisz, who worked wonders with Vanessa Redgrave
See full article at Gold Derby »

How the Brutal Murder of a Playboy Centerfold Sent Shock Waves Through Hollywood

How the Brutal Murder of a Playboy Centerfold Sent Shock Waves Through Hollywood
Dorothy Stratten had the world at her fingertips in 1980.

She had rocketed to fame as the Playboy Playmate of the Year. Now, Hollywood was calling. She landed guest roles on TV shows such as Buck Rodgers and Fantasy Island.

Things got even better for her when she earned a substantial role in the movie They All Laughed, a comedy film starring Audrey Hepburn, Ben Gazzara and John Ritter.

She maintained warm relationships with several Hollywood heavy hitters, including Playboy founder Hugh Hefner.

But Stratton’s personal life was messy. Her marriage to her controlling small-time manager, Paul Snider, was on the rocks.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Kids with Same Disease That Killed ‘Heaven or Hospital’ Girl Meet Dolphin with Scoliosis: ‘It Was Inspiring!’

  • PEOPLE.com
For a few brief hours, two dozen children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease, an incurable, degenerative neuromuscular disorder, forgot about their physical limitations and played with dolphins at the Miami Seaquarium in Florida.

“What an incredible experience!” Julia Beron, of Montville, New Jersey, tells People. “As a 17-year-old with a physical disability, there are many things that I’m unable to do. For most kids my age, the act of swimming with dolphins would be a simple task. However, in my case it is not something that I would normally feel comfortable doing. After a lot of convincing, I took my braces off,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Editing on Orson Welles’ ‘The Other Side of the Wind’ Aiming for Spring Start

It was nearly a year ago that we got the last substantial update about Orson Welles‘ long-overdue final feature, The Other Side of the Wind. After an initial fundraising campaign intended to help those involved with the production complete the un-edited film in time for Welles’ 100th birthday in May 2015 didn’t meet its goal, there was word that Netflix was discussing “the completion of the feature film for theatrical and streaming release and creation of a full-length documentary.” We finally have new development on the project, thanks to a Hollywood legend, and one of the stars of the film.

Last night, Peter Bogdanovich took part in a Q&A at the Metrograph in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, following a 35mm screening of his 1981 film They All Laughed. When asked about the status of The Other Side of the Wind, Bogdanovich revealed that, following many years of negotiation with
See full article at The Film Stage »

Interview: Director Icon Peter Bogdanovich Honored at 52nd Chicago International Film Festival

Chicago – If Peter Bogdanovich had only been a film writer and critic, he still would have made a major contribution to cinema culture. But he also chose to direct, and besides producing arguably one of the best American films ever made (“The Last Picture Show”), he continues to work and fulfill his creative vision.

Bogdanovich was honored at the 52nd Chicago International Film Festival with a Gold Hugo Career Lifetime Achievement designation, which was augmented with a magnificent documentary about a period in his career called “One Day Since Yesterday: Peter Bogdanovich and the Lost American Film.” The film tells the story of “They All Laughed” (1981), a post modern screwball comedy starring Audrey Hepburn, John Ritter and Dorothy Stratten. Bogdanovich was in a relationship with Stratten during the production of the film, and she was murdered by her ex-husband while the film was being edited. The tragedy, the prescience of
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Preview: First Week of Films at 52nd Chicago International Film Festival

Chicago – It’s Week One of the 52nd Chicago International Film Festival, and with so many film opportunities to experience, what are some of the highlights? The intrepid film reviewers of HollywoodChicago.com has been sampling the cinema fare for the first week, and offers the following capsule summaries.

HollywoodChicago.com reviewers Jon Espino (Je) and Patrick McDonald (Pm) has taken in the previews, and offer these recommendations for the first week of the festival. For a Pdf connection to the complete schedule, click here.

“The Confessions” (Italy/France)

’The Confessions,’ Directed by Roberto Ando

Photo credit: Chicago International Film Festival

The world is in fiscal meltdown, and a G8 summit of the world’s greatest economists is taking place in a remote coastal resort in Germany. One of economists has invited an Italian monk to the meetings, in order to make a confession. When that vital world leader turns up dead the next morning,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Brittanee Drexel's Father Says He Once Came Face-to-Face with an Alleged Suspect in Her Abduction

  • PEOPLE.com
Chad Drexel came face to face with the man he believes helped allegedly kidnap and kill his daughter, Brittanee Drexel - and who laughed at him when handed Brittanee's missing person flier, he claims in a new interview. While talking earlier this week to Radio 95.1 in Rochester, New York, Chad revealed how he traveled to the area of McClellanville, South Carolina, in 2013, searching for clues into his daughter's mysterious disappearance. There, Chad said, he unwittingly met the man the FBI alleges had something to do with her abduction and death. "The local authorities wouldn't go down to that area, saying,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Brittanee Drexel's Father Says He Once Came Face-to-Face with an Alleged Suspect in Her Abduction

  • PEOPLE.com
Chad Drexel came face to face with the man he believes helped allegedly kidnap and kill his daughter, Brittanee Drexel - and who laughed at him when handed Brittanee's missing person flier, he claims in a new interview. While talking earlier this week to Radio 95.1 in Rochester, New York, Chad revealed how he traveled to the area of McClellanville, South Carolina, in 2013, searching for clues into his daughter's mysterious disappearance. There, Chad said, he unwittingly met the man the FBI alleges had something to do with her abduction and death. "The local authorities wouldn't go down to that area, saying,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Scott Reviews Jack Hill’s The Swinging Cheerleaders [Arrow Video Blu-ray Review]

I’ve always been fascinated by the duality of Pre-Code cinema, which is talked up in classic film circles as a sin-fueled dungeon of excess, but in most cases simply uses outlandish scenarios to moralistic ends. Baby Face might be about a woman sleeping her way to the top of society, but Barbara Stanwyck still has to realize love is more important than all the riches she’s accrued. Scarface might glorify violence, but Paul Muni will still get his in the end. Indulgence and retreat; enjoy the highs, but shape up or be doomed. Similarly, in the 1970s, after the Motion Picture Production Code was shattered and a wave of sex-fueled odysseys came rushing to the screens, they tended to strike out familiar territory, using their exploitative qualities to reinforce the status quo. So it is with The Swinging Cheerleaders. Jack Hill’s 1974 cheapo gets high on its topless women and under-the-table groping,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: ‘Inside Out,’ ‘The End of the Tour,’ ‘She’s Funny That Way,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The End of the Tour (James Ponsoldt)

The last two trips director James Ponsoldt made to Sundance it was with two excellent dramas: Smashed and The Spectacular Now. This year, Ponsoldt returns with the often moving and consistently funny The End of the Tour. While the director’s latest may not be on par with his past two efforts, that’s not much of a problem considering the level of quality he achieves here. The End of the Tour follows a failed author,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Peter Bogdanovich Comedy ‘She’s Funny That Way’ With Owen Wilson & Jennifer Aniston Sets August Release

Peter Bogdanovich Comedy ‘She’s Funny That Way’ With Owen Wilson & Jennifer Aniston Sets August Release
Take that, Birdman! The Broadway-set screwball comedy reteaming Marley & Me stars Jennifer Aniston and Owen Wilson is the first from the They All Laughed director in 14 years. Nascent distributor Clarius Entertainment set the opening for August 21; it will bow against Lionsgate/Summit actioner Criminal, Warner’s romantic drama Me Before You and Focus’ horror sequel Sinister 2. Funny made its debut at last summer’s Venice Film Festival. Bogdanovich co-wrote the screenplay…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Review: Billy Crystal and Josh Gad in toothless TV satire 'The Comedians'

  • Hitfix
Review: Billy Crystal and Josh Gad in toothless TV satire 'The Comedians'
In 2012, when Billy Crystal returned to host the Oscars for the first time in years, he seemed surprised when so many of his jokes — many of them of the same type he deployed so effectively in his '90s hosting heyday — got a muted response from the audience. Again and again, his face seemed to be saying, They all laughed at this stuff before! What's changed? Crystal certainly hadn't, but the culture had changed around him. What had killed in the '90s was mostly dying in the '10s. Timing is everything in comedy, including the era in which you tell certain jokes. I thought of that Oscar night a lot while watching "The Comedians," the new FX comedy (it debuts Thursday night at 10) co-starring Crystal and Josh Gad as fictionalized versions of themselves, reluctantly teaming up to star in a show-within-a-show when fictional FX executives decide that Crystal
See full article at Hitfix »

Peter Bogdanovich Pushes for Non-‘Titanic’ Tentpoles

Peter Bogdanovich Pushes for Non-‘Titanic’ Tentpoles
Peter Bogdanovich blames James Cameron’s success with 1997’s “Titanic” for studios pulling the plug on smaller movies, such as his 1971 hit “The Last Picture Show.”

“The worst thing was when Cameron made ‘Titanic’ and spent $150 million,” he said Saturday night after receiving the King Vidor Award from the San Luis Obispo International Film Festival.

“So everyone was predicting a disaster and when it wasn’t, then everyone started spending that much,” said Bogdanovich. “We made ‘The Last Picture Show’ for $1.3 million and it made a ton of money.”

The Last Picture Show” made nearly $30 million in worldwide grosses. “Titanic” grossed $1.8 billion.

The Last Picture Show” star Timothy Bottoms held a Q&A with the director at the Fremont Theater prior to a screening of the desolate black-and-white drama, nominated for eight Oscars including best picture and director (Ben Johnson and Cloris Leachman won for their supporting performances).

“I never
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'She's Funny That Way' Trailer Starring Owen Wilson

'She's Funny That Way' Trailer Starring Owen Wilson
Legendary director Peter Bogdanovich returns with the new dramatic comedy She's Funny That Way. The first trailer has arrived, and it brings a star studded cast that includes Owen Wilson, Jennifer Aniston, Imogen Poots, Quentin Tarantino, Lucy Punch, Kathryn Hahn, Rhys Ifans, Will Forte and Debi Mazar.

She's Funny That Way follows a married Broadway director named Arnold (Owen Wilson) who falls for prostitute-turned-actress named Izzy (Imogen Poots) and tries to help advance her career. Along for the ride is Izzy's therapist Jane, Jane's husband and and Arnold's wife. Its sure to be one wild ride that fits right in with such Peter Bogdanovich classics as Paper Moon and What's Up Doc?

If She's Funny That Way looks familiar to Peter Bogdanovich enthusiasts, it's because the director originally set out to make the movie in the late 90s. It would have reunited him with his The Last Picture Show leading
See full article at MovieWeb »

The film critics who turned to filmmaking

From the Pudsey The Dog movie to Joe Cornish and Roger Ebert, what happens when critics make films themselves?

Arts critics tend to get a rough time of it in the movies. Even looking at this year's awards season hopefuls, Birdman casts a wonderfully scabrous Lindsay Duncan as a theatre critic who is determined to kill the hero's play, and Mr. Turner presents John Ruskin as a lisping, pretentious fop, a representation that has led some to take mild umbrage.

To look even further back, at Ratatouille's sneering Anton Ego, or Lady In The Water's film-savvy 'straw critic', or Theatre Of Blood's gleefully murderous tract, there's not a whole lot of love for critics in film. Any of this might give way to the preconception that critics, especially film critics, don't actually like films and that they're out of touch with both the filmmakers whose works they
See full article at Den of Geek »

Elizabeth Pena 'Modern Family' Actress, Dies At 55

Elizabeth Peña, the TV and movie actress, died on Tuesday after a brief illness. She was 55.

Elizabeth Peña Dies

Peña’s manager confirmed her untimely death to CNN. Details on the illness that took her life have not been revealed.

On Modern Family, Peña proved to be a scene stealer playing the mom of Gloria (Sofia Vergara), Pilar, in the show’s 2013 season. She’s also had memorable guest-starring roles on Major Crimes, Prime Suspect, Ghost Whisperer, Without a Trace, NCIS and more. Peña’s most recent leading role on a TV show was as Maritza Sandoval in Matador.

Peña, who had her first film role in 1979, has been in tens of moves. Over the decades, she’s appeared in They All Laughed, Down and Out in Beverly Hills, La Bamba, Free Willy 2: The Adventure Home, Rush Hour, Tortilla Soup and voiced the part of Mirage in The Incredibles.
See full article at Uinterview »

Venice Film Review: ‘One Day Since Yesterday: Peter Bogdanovich and the Lost American Film’

Venice Film Review: ‘One Day Since Yesterday: Peter Bogdanovich and the Lost American Film’
In this new century of splintered viewing and distribution options, it’s harder than ever for modern films to be truly lost — but our regard for them can be, which is what director Bill Teck argues nearly happened to Peter Bogdanovich’s dry-but-sparkling 1981 romantic comedy “They All Laughed.” How it fell from public and critical view, only to be retrieved by a passionate new generation of champions, is the ostensible subject of Teck’s enjoyable if inelegantly assembled doc “One Day Since Yesterday: Peter Bogdanovich and the Lost American Film,” though it expands into a chatty examination of the filmmaker’s post-peak career, and the emotional aftermath of his ill-fated affair with “Laughed” star Dorothy Stratten.

At one point in Teck’s documentary, Quentin Tarantino makes the point that Bogdanovich was the first filmmaker to be granted his own place in Hollywood celebrity culture — more so than more latterly celebrated contemporaries like Scorsese,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘One Day Since Yesterday: Peter Bogdanovich & the Lost American Film’: Venice Review

‘One Day Since Yesterday: Peter Bogdanovich & the Lost American Film’: Venice Review
How fitting that 32 years after the Venice Film Festival opened with They All Laughed, Peter Bogdanovich’s swirling love letter to love and to New York City, the director is back on the Lido as the subject of a documentary focusing on that long-overlooked romantic caper comedy and its turbulent backstory. This is engrossing material, and its specificity alone makes One Day Since Yesterday worth watching. But while there’s no doubting director Bill Teck’s passion for the project, his inexperience as a filmmaker shows in the disorganized, technically rough study, which outstays its usefulness by a good half-hour,

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Venice: Bogdanovich Unveils Screwball Comedy ‘She’s Funny That Way’, Riffs On ‘Lost Hollywood’

Venice: Bogdanovich Unveils Screwball Comedy ‘She’s Funny That Way’, Riffs On ‘Lost Hollywood’
Thirty-two years after They All Laughed opened the Venice Film Fesitval, Peter Bogdanovich is back on the Lido with screwball comedy She’s Funny That Way. He spoke to the press this afternoon about the star-studded project coming together and noted that today, the kinds of smaller films he likes can only be made independently. “I don’t want to bite the hand that doesn’t feed me,” he said to much laughter, “but unfortunately, Hollywood has gone in the wrong direction.”

The out of competition She’s Funny That Way itself got a lot of laughs when it screened this morning. It stars Owen Wilson, Jennifer Aniston, Kathryn Hahn, Imogen Poots, Rhys Ifans, and Will Forte — along with blink-and-you’ll-miss-them cameos from Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter and Bogdanovich’s Paper Moon star Tatum O’Neal, as well as a longer turn by a very famous director. The
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Venice Film Review: ‘She’s Funny That Way’

Screwball comedy was already a retro affair when Peter Bogdanovich mastered it in 1972 with “What’s Up, Doc?” Forty-two years later, that ageless throwback is the standard to which the director aspires in “She’s Funny That Way,” . At once invoking genre forebears like Ernst Lubitsch and contemporaries like Woody Allen, this diverting tale of a Brooklyn callgirl wreaking havoc among the romantically frustrated cast and crew of a dud Broadway play accumulates the necessary narrative chaos without ever building a full head of comic steam. The diverting result will find a modest audience principally among those old enough to recall Bogdanovich’s glory days.

“She’s Funny That Way” was initially, and more intriguingly, titled “Squirrels to the Nuts,” a reference to an irresistible nugget of do-your-own-thing philosophy from “Cluny Brown,” Lubitsch’s last completed film: “Some people like to feed nuts to the squirrels, but if someone wants
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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