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Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Annie Hall,’ ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Reds’

  • Gold Derby
Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Annie Hall,’ ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Reds’
Diane Keaton is one of those special actors who can shift from comedy to drama without missing a beat. She has been nominated for two Oscars in comedy (“Something’s Gotta Give” and winning for “Annie Hall”) and two in drama (“Reds” and “Marvin’s Room”). Keaton is now back in theaters joining Oscar winners Jane Fonda and Mary Steenburgen, as well as five-time Emmy Award winner Candice Bergen in Bill Holderman‘s comedy “Book Club.”

Keaton is also a key cast member in one of the seminal film series of all time — Francis Ford Coppola‘s “The Godfather” trilogy. Her heartbreaking turn as Kay Adams Corleone, a woman who sincerely believed that her husband was a good man, will forever be a part of motion picture history.

See AFI Life Achievement Recipients Photo Gallery

A recipient of the 2017 American Film Institute life achievement award, Keaton has also been nominated
See full article at Gold Derby »

Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Diane Keaton is one of those special actors who can shift from comedy to drama without missing a beat. She has been nominated for two Oscars in comedy (“Something’s Gotta Give” and winning for “Annie Hall”) and two in drama (“Reds” and “Marvin’s Room”). Keaton is now back in theaters joining Oscar winners Jane Fonda and Mary Steenburgen, as well as five-time Emmy Award winner Candice Bergen in Bill Holderman‘s comedy “Book Club.”

Keaton is also a key cast member in one of the seminal film series of all time — Francis Ford Coppola‘s “The Godfather” trilogy. Her heartbreaking turn as Kay Adams Corleone, a woman who sincerely believed that her husband was a good man, will forever be a part of motion picture history.

A recipient of the 2017 American Film Institute life achievement award, Keaton has also been nominated for eight Golden Globes for her work in film,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1980s: Jessica Lange, Olympia Dukakis, Dianne Wiest … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1980s: Jessica Lange, Olympia Dukakis, Dianne Wiest … ? [Poll]
The Best Supporting Actress Oscar winners of the 1980s include both well-known leading ladies and beloved veteran actresses. The decade saw stars like Jessica Lange, Geena Davis and Anjelica Huston earn their Oscars, joining Mary Steenburgen, Dianne Wiest, Linda Hunt, Olympia Dukakis and Brenda Fricker, who have all had solid careers since their wins. The decade also has two winning actresses that have since died, Maureen Stapleton and Peggy Ashcroft, though their performances will not be forgotten.

Who is your favorite Best Supporting Actress winner of the 1980s? Look back on each and vote in our poll below.

Mary Steenburgen, “Melvin and Howard” (1980) — The decade started off with Steenburgen winning her Oscar for “Melvin and Howard,” about Melvin Dummar (Paul Le Mat), who claimed to be the heir of Howard Hughes‘ fortune. Steenburgen plays Lynda, Melvin’s wife who takes up stripping and is frustrated by Melvin’s behavior. This
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]
Like the other acting winners of the 1980s, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor went to big stars and character actors alike. The ’80s featured big-name winners like Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Sean Connery and Michael Caine alongside hardworking veterans like John Gielgud, Louis Gossett Jr. and Don Ameche. The Academy also rewarded emerging talent, like Timothy Hutton, Haing S. Ngor and the now double-champ Denzel Washington.

So who is your favorite Best Supporting Actor winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Timothy Hutton, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Hutton came out of the gate strong with his heartbreaking performance in Best Picture winner “Ordinary People.” Hutton plays Conrad Jarrett, a teenager wracked with guilt after his brother is killed in a boating accident. Hutton is clearly the lead of the film, but at age 20, the studio may have felt it fairer
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of 1980s: Oliver Stone x 2, Warren Beatty, Robert Redford … ? [Poll]
The 1980s at the Oscars were full of matches between Best Picture and Best Director. Of the 10 Best Director winners, eight of their films won Best Picture, including Robert Redford, Richard Attenborough, James L. Brooks, Milos Forman, Sydney Pollack, Oliver Stone, Bernardo Bertolucci and Barry Levinson. The only instances of a Picture/Director split were in 1981 when Warren Beatty won for “Reds” and 1989 when Stone won his second directing Oscar for “Born on the Fourth of July.”

So who is your favorite Best Director winner of the ’80s? Look back on each of their wins and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Robert Redford, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Redford’s directorial debut proved he had the chops, winning for the harrowing domestic drama “Ordinary People.” Redford’s other Oscar nominations were for “The Sting” (1973) in Best Actor and both Best Picture and Best Director for “Quiz Show” (1994).

SEEDirector Ava DuVernay
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: This quartet of acting winners is the second oldest ever

2018 Oscars: This quartet of acting winners is the second oldest ever
This year’s quartet of Oscar acting winners is one for the ages. With an average age of 56.5, 59-year-old Gary Oldman (“Darkest Hour”), 60-year-old Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), 49-year-old Sam Rockwell (“Three Billboards”) and 58-year-old Allison Janney (“I, Tonya”) are the second oldest foursome to take home Oscars.

They only trail the Class of 1981, which featured three septuagenarians — 76-year-old Best Actor Henry Fonda (“On Golden Pond”), 74-year-old Best Actress Katharine Hepburn (“On Golden Pond”) and 77-year-old Best Supporting Actor John Gielgud (“Arthur”) — and 56-year-old Maureen Stapleton (“Reds”) for an average age of 70.75, which may never be surpassed. Since the supporting races weren’t added until the ninth ceremony, Oldman, McDormand, Rockwell and Janney aren’t the second oldest set of winners overall; that belongs to then-53-year-old Lionel Barrymore (“A Free Soul”) and then-63-year-old Marie Dressler (“Min and Bill”), whose average age was 58 at the fourth Oscars.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Best Picture presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway return for do-over

2018 Oscars: Best Picture presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway return for do-over
The 2017 Oscars ended with the most shocking moment in the 89-year history of the Academy Awards: Best Picture presenter Warren Beatty was given the wrong envelope and his co-presenter, Faye Dunaway, erroneously announced that “La La Land” had won, instead of “Moonlight.” Looks like these one-time co-stars will be reunited on this Sunday’s ceremony and given a chance for a do-over.

Beatty has made merry with the mishap over the ensuing year. When he appeared on “The Graham Norton Show” in the UK, the host characterized this snafu as “the TV moment of if not the year, the decade,” Beatty wondered if it did not qualify rather for an even higher status by asking “not the century?”

As he explained to Norton, he knew something was amiss the moment he opened the envelope and saw that it said Best Actress: Emma Stone, “La La Land.” “I thought well, maybe this is a misprint.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Film Review: ‘Confessions of a Teenage Jesus Jerk’

Film Review: ‘Confessions of a Teenage Jesus Jerk’
Warning: While watching “Confessions of a Teenage Jesus Jerk,” a coming-of-age dramedy about the disillusionment of a hormonally inflamed young Jehovah’s Witness during the mid-1980s, you may periodically find yourself fearing that you nodded off, or blacked out, and missed key scenes of transition or contextualization. Making a disappointingly inauspicious debut as a feature filmmaker (despite considerable experience helming episodic television), actor-turned-director Eric Stoltz lurches from scene to scene with scant regard for remedying narrative gaps or inconsistencies of characterization. It’s almost as though, while adapting his own novel for the screen, screenwriter Tony DuShane simply provided a random sampling of highlights from his book, and Stoltz accepted the slapdash scenario as his overarching game plan.

Gabe (Sasha Feldman), the eponymous protagonist, is introduced as a 16-year-old high-schooler who’s not yet rebellious, but no longer unquestioning, as he grapples with demands placed on him by his parents and his church in their Utah community
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars 2018: Will Best Picture and Best Director line up for the first time since ‘Birdman’?

Oscars 2018: Will Best Picture and Best Director line up for the first time since ‘Birdman’?
It used to be pretty much an Academy Awards norm that the film that won Best Picture also took home the Oscar for Best Director. In recent years that has changed, largely due to the preferential ballot that has been implemented for Best Picture voting. These two categories have split in four of the past five years, with “Birdman” (2014) and its director Alejandro G. Inarritu being the last time they lined up. Currently “The Shape of Water” is in first place to win both categories on Gold Derby’s Oscar charts, so might things get back on track this year?

See 2018 Oscar nominations: Full list of Academy Awards nominees in all 24 categories

A year ago Damien Chazelle won Best Director for “La La Land” while “Moonlight” took Best Picture, becoming the fourth time this decade that the Oscar split occurred. In 2015 Inarritu won Best Director for “The Revenent” (his second
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]
The Best Actor Oscar winners of the 1990s include some of the most legendary actors in film history, like Anthony Hopkins, Al Pacino, Tom Hanks and Jack Nicholson. We’ve also seen actors springboard off their victories to have fruitful careers in film, like Geoffrey Rush and Nicolas Cage. Now, two decades later, which do you consider the greatest Best Actor winner of the 1990s?

Refamiliarize yourself with the winners and be sure to vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Actor.)

Jeremy Irons, “Reversal of Fortune” (1990) — The ’90s began with Jeremy Irons being awarded for “Reverse of Fortune,” in which the actor plays Claus von Bulow, a man charged with attempted murder after his wife goes into diabetic shock. Despite a long career in film this remains Irons’ only nomination and win, though he has won two Emmys for voiceover work and another for his performance in 2005’s “Elizabeth I.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars flashback: Joel and Ethan Coen win Best Picture for ‘No Country for Old Men’ 10 years ago [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Joel and Ethan Coen win Best Picture for ‘No Country for Old Men’ 10 years ago [Watch]
Producer Scott Rudin made one of the greatest decisions of his life when he approached Joel and Ethan Coen about directing a project for him in 2005. He had purchased the film rights to “No Country for Old Men,” a new novel by Cormac McCarthy about a drug deal gone wrong on the United States/Mexico border in the 1980s. But they were hesitant to accept since they were known for writing their own original movies, including an Oscar victory for the screenplay of Fargo” in 1996.

See Oscar Best Picture Gallery: History of Every Academy Award-Winning Movie

The finished film brought them back to the Academy Awards 10 years ago and became the Best Picture of 2007 at the ceremony in 2008 (watch the video above). They would also take home trophies for Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay that evening. With this triumph the Coen brothers joined James Cameron as the most recent
See full article at Gold Derby »

Jimmy Kimmel and Warren Beatty Poke Fun at Envelopegate in New Oscars Commercial — Watch

ABC timed this morning’s Oscar nominations with a new commercial promoting the March 4 ceremony, to be hosted by Jimmy Kimmel. A recent Best Talk Show winner at the Critics’ Choice Awards, Kimmel presided over the film industry’s biggest night last year, a telecast that concluded with a historic, preposterous gaffe when Best Picture was accidentally awarded to “La La Land” instead of the rightful victor, “Moonlight.”

Per the ad, the misstep still gives Kimmel nightmares — he has a flashback to “La La Land” producer Jordan Horowitz correcting the blunder, statuette in hand — and he’s triggered by the site of envelopes. The “Jimmy Kimmel Live” personality admits his Oscar Round 2 anxieties while speaking on what appears to be a therapist’s couch, before it is revealed that he’s actually inside Warren Beatty’s study, venting to the 1982 Best Director (“Reds”), who has no sympathies.

Oscars 2017: Jimmy
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars 2018: Margot Robbie (‘I, Tonya’) could make history as an actress and producer

Oscars 2018: Margot Robbie (‘I, Tonya’) could make history as an actress and producer
Margot Robbie (“I, Tonya”) is a shoo-in for a nomination for Best Actress next week, but she could end up making Oscars history in another category as well as was recently reported by one of our Experts, Sasha Stone (Awards Daily). Robbie is also a producer of the film, so if “I, Tonya” also receives a Best Picture nomination she would be the first actress to receive acting and producing nominations for the same film. After a year that saw actresses Nicole Kidman (“Big Little Lies”), Elisabeth Moss (“The Handmaid’s Tale”), and Julia Louis-Dreyfus (“Veep”) all win Emmys as both actors and producers of TV programs, it would be fitting for Robbie’s passion project to go the distance with a pair of historic Oscar nominations.

It has been an incredible year for female stories, both real and fictional. The “Me Too” and “Time’s Up” movements have shined
See full article at Gold Derby »

Lyon’s Lumiere Festival Honors Classic Film

The 9th Lumière Festival in Lyon, France, is again bringing together some of the biggest names in world cinema, including Guillermo Del Toro, Wong Kar-wai and Michael Mann, while celebrating the history of film with some 400 screenings of international classics.

Launched in 2009 by Bertrand Tavernier and Thierry Frémaux, the respective president and director of the Institut Lumière, the event has become one of the largest international festivals of classic cinema. Last year it hosted 160,500 festivalgoers – up from 2015’s 150,000 admissions – and more than 1,000 industry professionals.

It was in Lyon where brothers Auguste and Louis Lumière invented the cinematograph in 1895, and in keeping with the city’s cinematic tradition, the festival celebrates the history of film by presenting restored works, retrospectives, tributes and master classes.

In 2013, the festival also started what it describes as the first and only classic film market in the world, noting that the heritage cinema sector is currently expanding thanks to advancements in conservation standards
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Festival: Folk Music at Newport, 1963-1966

We thought all the great vintage music documentaries were accounted for, but Murray Lerner’s look at the Newport Folk Festival in the mid-‘sixties is a terrific time machine to a kindler, gentler musical era. The mix of talent is broad and deep, and we get to see excellent vintage coverage of some real legends, before the hype & marketing plague arrived.

Festival: Folk Music at Newport, 1963-1966

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 892

1967 / B&W / 1:33 flat full frame / 97 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date September 12, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Joan Baez, Johnny Cash, Judy Collins, Donovan, Bob Dylan, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Pete Seeger, Peter Yarrow, Mary Travers, Odetta, Ronnie Gilbert, Mike Bloomfield, Paul Butterfield, Theodore Bikel, Cousin Emmy, Horton Barker, Fiddler Beers, Mimi Fariña, Richard Farina, Mrs. Ollie Gilbert, Fannie Lou Hamer, Son House, Mississippi John Hurt, John Koerner, Jim Kweskin, Tex Logan, Mel Lyman, Spokes Mashiyane, Fred McDowell, Brownie McGhee, Pappy Clayton McMichen,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Win a digital download of Rules Don’t Apply

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Competitions

To mark the release of Rules Don’t Apply on 14th August, we’ve been given 2 digital download codes to give away.

It’s Hollywood, 1958. An aspiring young actress, songwriter, beauty queen and devout Baptist virgin, Marla Mabrey (Lily Collins: Mirror Mirror, The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones, Love Rosie), and her young, ambitious, deeply religious Methodist chauffeur, Frank Forbes (Alden Ehrenreich: Hail, Ceasar!, Blue Jasmin), both struggle with the absurd eccentricities of the wildly unpredictable billionaire they work for, Howard Hughes (Warren Beatty: Dick Tracy, Bonnie & Clyde, Reds, Shampoo). Their attraction to each other not only puts their religious convictions to the test, but also defies Hughes’ #1 rule: no employee is allowed to have any relationship whatsoever with a contract actress. Hughes’ behavior draws them both deeper into his bizarre world and their lives are changed forever.

Please note: This competition is open to
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Oscar-Nominated Actor Sam Shepard Dies After Secret Battle with Als

  • PEOPLE.com
Oscar-Nominated Actor Sam Shepard Dies After Secret Battle with Als
Sam Shepard, known for his acting work in films such as Black Hawk Down and The Right Stuff, has died. He was 73.

Shepard’s theater representative confirms to People that Shepard passed away at his home in Kentucky on Thursday, July 27, from complications from Als, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The actor’s battle with Als was not publicly known. He was with his family at the time of his death.

“The family requests privacy at this difficult time,” said Chris Boneau, the family’s spokesman.

The representative said funeral arrangements would remain private. Plans for a public
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Warren Beatty to Receive Screenwriters Colony Honor

Warren Beatty to Receive Screenwriters Colony Honor
Warren Beatty has been selected for a tribute by the Screenwriters Colony, a Massachusetts-based non-profit residency and mentorship program that supports emerging writers.

Beatty will be honored at the group’s fifth Annual Summer Soiree on July 22 at Almanack Arts Colony in Nantucket, Mass. Sarah Treem, creator of the Showtime series “The Affair” and an alumna of Screenwriters Colony, will speak about her professional experiences and the impact the Colony has played in her life.

The tribute portion of the event will include a conversation with Beatty. Annette Bening, Beatty’s wife of 25 years, will join him at the event to celebrate.

Beatty has been nominated for 14 Academy Awards – four for Best Actor, four for Best Picture, two for Best Director, three for Original Screenplay, and one for Adapted Screenplay. He won Best Director for “Reds” and is the only person to have been twice-nominated for acting in, directing, writing, and producing the same film,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Diane Keaton Looks Back on Her Epic Romances with Woody Allen, Al Pacino and Warren Beatty

Diane Keaton Looks Back on Her Epic Romances with Woody Allen, Al Pacino and Warren Beatty
Diane Keaton has never been married, but she’s had plenty of high-profile romances — and she clearly lingers in the minds of her men.

On June 9, when she received the American Film Institute’s 45th Lifetime Achievement Award, former boyfriends and costars Warren Beatty, Al Pacino and Woody Allen were among the Hollywood luminaries on hand to sing her praises. “You’re a great artist,” Pacino told her from the stage at the Dolby Theater. “I love you forever.”

The Annie Hall star, now 71, has her own fond memories of her “many loves,” as she laughingly calls her exes.

She
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

5 Lessons For Actresses from Diane Keaton’s AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Tribute

5 Lessons For Actresses from Diane Keaton’s AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Tribute
When Diane Keaton accepted the 45th AFI Life Achievement Award from Woody Allen in Hollywood Thursday night, it was the end of one of the more memorable AFI tributes. And as one actress after another explained why Keaton was such a significant role model — from Oscar-winners Emma Stone, Reese Witherspoon (Keaton-directed TV movie “Wildflower”) and Meryl Streep (“Marvin’s Room”) to Rachel McAdams (“The Family Stone”) and comedienne Lisa Kudrow (“Hanging Up”) — it struck me that all actresses should pay attention to why Keaton is so admired and emulated.

Here are some wise lessons to be learned from the star of “Play It Again Sam,” “The First Wives Club,” “Crimes of the Heart,” “Shoot the Moon,” and HBO’s “The Young Pope.”

1. Stay single.

Keaton launched her Hollywood career with the day-long wedding scene in “The Godfather,” at the end of which she and fellow theater outsider Al Pacino proceeded to get royally drunk.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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