Polyester (1981) - News Poster

(1981)

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‘Woodshock’ Directors on Creating Their Hallucinatory Directorial Debut

Although until now they’ve only been known as fashion designers, cinema has always been part of Kate and Laura Mulleavy’s work. The siblings often use films as inspiration for their collections and have delivered runway shows dedicated to the likes of Japanese horror movie Kuroneko among others, their elaborate, stunning designs are also staples of awards season red carpets with actresses like Kirsten Dunst and Natalie Portman wearing them to festivals and ceremonies. In fact, Portman collected her first Best Actress Oscar in a purple Rodarte gown, after Kate and Laura had designed many of the costumes for Black Swan. After being so immersed in the world of cinema, it seems that making a film was the logical next step, and so they’ve done with Woodshock, a hallucinatory journey into the mind of Theresa (Dunst) a young woman battling depression after the death of her mother.

The
See full article at The Film Stage »

John Waters Summer Camp Will Offer Cigars, Scotch, Burlesque Lessons

John Waters Summer Camp Will Offer Cigars, Scotch, Burlesque Lessons
Campy filmmaker John Waters has decided to get into the actual camp business — summer camp, that is. Of course, screenings of his cult classics like “Pink Flamingos” and “Polyester” aren’t for the youngsters, so this weekend-long camp experience is for adults only.

An actual camp in Kent, Connecticut, complete with cabins and lake, is hosting the offbeat event September 22-24, with tickets starting at $499.

In addition to screening several of his films, fans of the quirky director who has been called “the Pope of trash” can participate in Bloody Mary Bingo, a costume contest, a dance party, and “Hairspray” karaoke.

There should be plenty of chances to hang with the acerbic raconteur, who will perform a one-man show with a Q&A. And S’mores aren’t the only thing on the menu — there’s also a Scotch and Cigars session.

Burlesque lessons, yoga and meditation are offered along
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Multiple Maniacs

Multiple Maniacs

Blu-ray

1970 / Black and White /96 Min. / 1:66 / Street Date March 21, 2017

Starring: Divine, David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce and Mink Stole.

Cinematography: John Waters

Film Editor: John Waters

Written by John Waters

Produced by John Waters

Directed by John Waters

Andy Warhol was nothing if not a multi-media maven. Along with his ubiquitous silkscreens and sculpture, he embraced movie-making beginning as early as 1963 with such literal-minded efforts as Haircut (a haircut) and Taylor Mead’s Ass (one hour of exactly what you think) and pretty much closed shop with 1968’s Lonesome Cowboys, a 109 minute western satire that, of all his films, came closest to approximating a traditional tinseltown production.

Essentially Warhol was parodying the Hollywood studio system, rounding up his acolytes and hangers-on, from supermodels to pushers, and casting them as regular performers in a series of deadpan documentaries. Meanwhile in the wilds of Baltimore, Warhol fan John Waters
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

John Waters Lauded at Writers Guild Awards for ‘A Lifetime of Penning Trashy Screenplays’

John Waters Lauded at Writers Guild Awards for ‘A Lifetime of Penning Trashy Screenplays’
John Waters and his fight for the right to be trashy on film was celebrated with gusto on Sunday at the New York edition of the Writers Guild Awards ceremony.

Waters got two standing ovations for his legacy in battling film censors and going it alone as an independent filmmaker out of Baltimore in the 1970s. Waters reveled in the applause and the appreciation, telling the crowd at the Edison Ballroom that he has always thought of himself, first and foremost, as a writer.

“Every single weekday I get up at 6 a.m. and go into my writing room and think up something f—– up,” Waters said. “In the afternoon I go try and sell it. Isn’t that what all writers do?”

Preaching to the choir, Waters added: “Writing is the only part of filmmaking I really love.”

Waters couldn’t resist the platform to remind the room of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Martha Thomases: 4Dx, Batman’s Religion, and Me

  • Comicmix
It’s a twofer this week, folks. I have two things that are obsessing me, neither of which really qualifies for a full column, but both are so interesting (to me, anyway) that I must opine.

Hey! There’s a new movie format!

It’s called 4Dx, and it’s not a better picture or more frames per second or three dimensional. Instead, it involves seats that vibrate and sometimes move, fans that mimic wind, and sometimes water and aroma effects.

Apparently, this format has been around for a few months, but I only found out about it this past weekend. My friend Renee and I went to see The Magnificent Seven. When we got to the theater, we found out that the show we had planned to see was in this funky new format. It was going to be another 45 minutes before the next show in a normal theater.
See full article at Comicmix »

John Waters’ Amazing, And Newly Restored, ‘Multiple Maniacs’ Marked the Birth of Hater Nation

John Waters’ Amazing, And Newly Restored, ‘Multiple Maniacs’ Marked the Birth of Hater Nation
In his long and storied career, writer-director John Waters, the Baltimore bard of trash and sleaze and twisted kicks, has staged all kinds of scenes, from delinquent comedy to hardcore gross-outs to grungy fairy-tale burlesque to rock & roll homicide. Yet he has almost never staged a classic movie love scene, full of kissing and panting and writhing, the way he does in “Multiple Maniacs.”

Okay, it is a John Waters love scene. His heroine, who for most of the movie goes by the rather decorous name of Lady Divine (by the end, the “Lady” has been dropped in every way), is inside a church when she succumbs to the advances of Mink Stole, playing a dainty middle-class frump with secret desires. The two make out near the confessional, and then clothes come off, and then Mink indulges Lady Divine in a “rosary job” — which should more or less hit the top of the outrage meter.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Daily | John Waters and Multiple Maniacs

Janus Films and the Criterion Collection have restored John Waters's "gloriously grotesque, unavailable-for-decades second feature," Multiple Maniacs (1970), and they're rolling it out to theaters starting today. "But is it some kind of lost masterpiece?" asks Neil Genzlinger in the New York Times. "No. It’s merely an interesting milestone on the path to Mr. Waters’s better-known works, like Pink Flamingos (1972), Polyester (1981) and the original Hairspray (1988)." But at Slant, Clayton Dillard notes that the "politics of personal sexual preference underscore nearly every scene." The Voice's Bilge Ebiri: "Waters knows it's bad and revels in it." We've got more reviews, interviews and the trailer. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | John Waters and Multiple Maniacs

Janus Films and the Criterion Collection have restored John Waters's "gloriously grotesque, unavailable-for-decades second feature," Multiple Maniacs (1970), and they're rolling it out to theaters starting today. "But is it some kind of lost masterpiece?" asks Neil Genzlinger in the New York Times. "No. It’s merely an interesting milestone on the path to Mr. Waters’s better-known works, like Pink Flamingos (1972), Polyester (1981) and the original Hairspray (1988)." But at Slant, Clayton Dillard notes that the "politics of personal sexual preference underscore nearly every scene." The Voice's Bilge Ebiri: "Waters knows it's bad and revels in it." We've got more reviews, interviews and the trailer. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

John Waters on ‘Multiple Maniacs,’ His Favorite Filmmakers & Why He Hasn’t Directed in More Than a Decade

John Waters on ‘Multiple Maniacs,’ His Favorite Filmmakers & Why He Hasn’t Directed in More Than a Decade
John Waters has made 16 films over the course of his nearly 50-year career, one of which has remained elusive for years: 1970’s “Multiple Maniacs.” Janus Films recently restored the cult icon’s second feature, and Waters spoke to us about the film’s re-release, the filmmakers of today he most admires and why he hasn’t directed in more than 10 years.

There’s a funny coincidence because our TV team is at the TCAs. NBC is promoting “Hairspray Live” as part of their upfronts. It’s like Must See TV for the Whole Family. Meanwhile, your “Multiple Maniacs” restoration is going to promote rosary jobs for a whole new generation. Is this your idea of a balanced life?

It is, because I felt the same thing. I did in June a thing with the Baltimore Symphony, where they do “Hairspray,” and I’m sort of like Victor Borge and I
See full article at Indiewire »

The Neon Demon or Another Reason to Hate Top Models and Danish-Born Directors

The Danish-born director, Nicolas Winding Refn, has helmed a few popular movies such as Drive (2011), Bronson (2008), and the Pusher trilogy. This success has been only slightly marred by a handful of far-less-favored works including Fear X (2003) and Only God Forgives (2013) starring Ryan Gosling.

Ironically, that latter disaster supplied grist for one of the best scenes in the documentary, My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn, which was helmed by Refn's wife, the talented but put-upon Liz Corfixen. Near the end of her engaging feature on her self-absorbed spouse, Refn, lying on his bed after the Cannes opening of Only God Forgives, mutters, "Why do critics have to be so cruel?" Then he reads aloud off his cell phone this Hollywood Elsewhere critique by Jeffrey Wells:

"Movies really don't get much worse... It's a shit macho fantasy -- hyperviolent, ethically repulsive, sad, nonsensical, deathly dull, snail-paced, idiotic, possibly woman-hating, visually suffocating, pretentious... [T]his is a defecation by an over-praised, over-indulged director who thinks anything he craps out is worthy of your time. I felt violated, shat upon, sedated, narcotized, appalled and bored stiff."

What I found so fascinating here, besides Refn's reaction to such verbiage ("That's how you know when you made great cinema. When half love and half hate it."), was that Mr. Wells will be able to reuse his review word for word for The Neon Demon.

This tale focuses upon a sixteen-year-old virgin, Jesse (Elle Fanning), who arrives in Los Angeles to begin a modeling career. Her first job is to lie on a couch with her neck supposedly slit and the fake blood streaming everywhere. The photographer is the young, kind-hearted Dean (Karl Glusman, who exposed his erection throughout Gaspar Noé's equally dull Love (2015)). The chap instantly falls in love with her.

Please don't ask why a nice guy would have a young woman pose with her body mutilated, other than it is a striking visual to open a film with. Anyway, Jesse has no time for love. Admitting herself talentless except for being pretty, she has only one item on her bucket list: to be a top model. Seemingly, she will succeed because when this young woman enters a room, everyone stares. Men. Women. Goats. Chimpanzees.

The very next day she's hired by a modeling agency. Twenty-four hours later she's posing for a top brooding photographer (Desmond Harrington), who after spotting her, has everyone leave the studio, orders Jesse to strip, then rubs metallic paint all over her body. Hopefully, it's not lead-based.

Soon every blonde model in L.A. with an Olive-Oyl physique hates her for stealing their jobs, and to top it off, the manager (Keanu Reeves) of the cruddy motel she's staying in is a rapist with a Lolita fixation. Uh-oh. Can there be more? Poorly directed party scenes, stray wildcats and eyeballs, cannibalism, a vile depiction of a horny lesbian, necrophilia in a mortuary, and a dastardly over-the-top performance by Alessandro Nivola as a shallow fashion designer just scrape the top layer of the slime that slithers about as The Neon Demon.

Mr. Refn has noted his goal was to make a satire about the modeling industry and America's facile addiction to externals. He also wanted to explore the 16-year-old girl that resides within himself. As if that weren't enough inspiration, he's spouted, "One morning I woke and realized I was both surrounded and dominated by women. Strangely, a sudden urge was planted in me to make a horror film about vicious beauty."

Now if Mr. Refn had an iota of wit (visual or otherwise) or if he respected women (his wife says he just wants her around as a housewife) or if his half-baked ideas spent ten more minutes in the oven, this offering could have been a gas. Paul Morrisey, John Waters, or even Greg Araki might have shaped this hodgepodge into a tongue-in-cheek funfest. But if Refn is aiming for intentional laughs, he fails. He seems to have been treading more into David Lynch territory but was swallowed up by the quicksand of his own dullardry. More Blue Polyester than Blue Velvet.

That Refn had no idea what he was creating with Demon was not a new occurrence for this vanquished auteur. He has said of a previous effort, "I've spent three years on this movie, and I don't really know what it's about." Then after the filming and the editing of Only God Forgives was completed, he observed to his wife," I wasted six months of our lives." Happily, for us, with his latest, our wasted time clocks in at one hour and 57 minutes. It just feels like six months.

(The Neon Demon, which had its world premiere at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival to several boos, opens in theaters on June 24th.) - Brandon Judell

Mr. Judell has written on film for The Village Voice, indieWire.com, the New York Daily News, Soho Style, and The Advocate, and is anthologized in Cynthia Fuchs's Spike Lee Interviews (University Press of Mississippi) and John Preston's A Member of the Family (Dutton). He is also a member of the performance/writing group FlashPoint.
See full article at CultureCatch »

Why We'll Never Forget Robert Mapplethorpe

Robert Mapplethorpe decided he was an important artist long before he was even making important art. Growing up in 1950s Queens, New York, he escaped to art school in Brooklyn, searching for a way to transform himself. He was the outcast who took drugs and dressed weird, until he found his path to stardom. That ambition shines through in the new HBO documentary, Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures. Directed by Randy Barbato and Fenton Bailey — the producers of RuPaul's Drag Race who have also examined oddballs and outliers in documentaries such as Party Monster,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Hof Film Days founder Heinz Badewitz dies at 74

  • ScreenDaily
Hof Film Days founder Heinz Badewitz dies at 74
World’s second longest-serving film festival director died last week while attending Graz film festival.

Filmmakers in Germany and beyond are mourning the passing of Heinz Badewitz, the founder of the Hof Film Days, who died unexpectedly last week at the age of 74 whilst attending last week’s Diagonale - Festival of Austrian Film in Graz.

Badewitz was the world’s second longest-serving film festival director after Chicago’s Michael Kutza (who launched his festival in 1964) and was planning Hof’s 50th anniversary in October.

Hailing from Hof in Northern Franconia, Badewitz had moved to Munich in the early 1960s to train as a cameraman and soon became part of the Munich film scene, later working as location manager on such films as Wim WendersKings Of The Road and The American Friend, and assistant director for Bob Fosse’s Cabaret and Norman Jewison’s Rollerball.

In addition, he was involved in the selection of German films for
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Bill Murray on Singing With George Clooney in ‘A Very Murray Christmas’

Bill Murray on Singing With George Clooney in ‘A Very Murray Christmas’
The weather outside was frightful in New York City on Wednesday night with rain and heavy fog, but the Yuletide cheer was so delightful at the Paris Theatre premiere of “A Very Murray Christmas,” an original Netflix special directed by Sofia Coppola and starring Bill Murray.

The “Ghostbusters” actor, 65, received big cheers and applause for his performance in the holiday spoof that pays homage to the 1960s and ’70s era when Bing Crosby and Andy Williams would croon Christmas carols and engage in seemingly impromptu duets with their famous friends for a one-night only television event. Murray sings and charms in nearly every scene of the hour-long special, which starts streaming Dec. 4 on Netflix.

“I was surprised by how well I sing,” Murray told Variety at the Paris Theater. “I realized when you feel free, it’s like singing in the shower, and everything sounds better and there is more confidence.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Daily | Goings On | Has, Ichikawa, Harrington

The Waking Dreams of Wojciech Has, a retrospective of 14 films including The Hourglass Sanatorium and The Saragossa Manuscript, opens today at BAMcinématek and runs through October 27. Also in New York, the Japan Society will be screening three new restorations of films by Kon Ichikawa this weekend and, next week, Film Forum presents John Waters's Polyester in glorious Odorama. More goings on: A Jean Grémillon retrospective in Los Angeles, an evening of short films by Curtis Harrington in Nashville and a discussion of John Berger’s life and work in London. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Goings On | Has, Ichikawa, Harrington

The Waking Dreams of Wojciech Has, a retrospective of 14 films including The Hourglass Sanatorium and The Saragossa Manuscript, opens today at BAMcinématek and runs through October 27. Also in New York, the Japan Society will be screening three new restorations of films by Kon Ichikawa this weekend and, next week, Film Forum presents John Waters's Polyester in glorious Odorama. More goings on: A Jean Grémillon retrospective in Los Angeles, an evening of short films by Curtis Harrington in Nashville and a discussion of John Berger’s life and work in London. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Rescheduled! – Tab Hunter Confidential – The QFest St. Louis Review

Tab Hunter Confidential now screens Monday, April 27th at 7pm at Landmark’s Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar) as part of this year’s QFest St. Louis. For ticket information, go Here

Hollywood can destroy people. For every survivor of the Hollywood system, whether from years ago or any current actors, there are dozens of actors and other artists who crashed and burned, had serious substance abuse issues, committed suicide or never made it at all.

Just from memory I can name Barbara Payton, Jayne Mansfield, Jeanne Eagles, Marilyn Monroe, James Dean, Diana Sands and Montgomery Clift. For a complete rundown you can’t do much better than Kenneth Anger’s incredible book Hollywood Babylon and it’s even more depressing sequel Hollywood Babylon Part Two. Vincent Price called Hollywood “the most evil place on Earth!” And Vincent Price would know something about evil!

A few short years ago I read Tab Hunter
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Tab Hunter Confidential – The QFest St. Louis Review

Tab Hunter Confidential screens Monday, April 20th at 7pm at Landmark’s Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar) as part if this year’s QFest St. Louis. For ticket information, go Here

Hollywood can destroy people. For every survivor of the Hollywood system, whether from years ago or any current actors, there are dozens of actors and other artists who crashed and burned, had serious substance abuse issues, committed suicide or never made it at all.

Just from memory I can name Barbara Payton, Jayne Mansfield, Jeanne Eagles, Marilyn Monroe, James Dean, Diana Sands and Montgomery Clift. For a complete rundown you can’t do much better than Kenneth Anger’s incredible book Hollywood Babylon and it’s even more depressing sequel Hollywood Babylon Part Two. Vincent Price called Hollywood “the most evil place on Earth!” And Vincent Price would know something about evil!

A few short years ago I read Tab Hunter
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

SXSW Film Review: ‘Tab Hunter Confidential’

SXSW Film Review: ‘Tab Hunter Confidential’
Like the autobiographical tome it’s based on, “Tab Hunter Confidential” provides a colorful, likable and unpretentious look at the 1950s Hollywood dreamboat who was living a closeted gay life even as he was marketed as every bobbysoxer’s ideal boyfriend. Sharing his subject’s good humor about himself, prolific docu and DVD-extra director Jeffrey Schwarz (“I Am Divine,” “Vito”) has assembled a pleasing if less-than-revelatory feature that should prove particularly popular on the gay fest circuit en route to broadcast and download sales.

Although somewhat conventionally framed by the drama of an early near-outing — as a 19-year-old Hollywood newbie, Hunter was arrested for attending a private gay party, something he recalls “would be thrown at me years later”—“Confidential” is not a story of torment in the closet. Indeed, the 2006 book Hunter wrote with Eddie Muller does a better job limning the internal and professional conflicts in his life,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Is John Waters the Next Robert Osborne? Filmmaker to Host Playboy’s Classic Porn

Playboy is hoping it can do for old porn what Time Warner’s Turner Classic Movies does for the best cinema of yesteryear.

The adult-entertainment company’s premium cable outlet, Playboy TV, will on Saturday night start a series called “Groundbreakers,” which will feature film director John Waters presenting and commenting upon some of the porn industry’s earliest commercial film successes.

“Porn classics are another extreme element of show business,” Waters said in an interview. Playboy reached out to him to host the series, and he was immediately interested, he said, having a strong interest in the history of cult cinema. “It’s an educational opportunity. You learn about the shows that you masturbated to for the first time.”

Others have tested the format. Showtime enlisted comedian Dave Attell to make fun of clips from old porn movies as part of “Dave’s Old Porn,” and he is often
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Setting the stage, part 1 by Anne-Katrin Titze

The Last Impresario director Gracie Otto on Michael White: "And everyone loved him. It was amazing." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Gracie Otto, in town for her Doc NYC screening of The Last Impresario, spoke about connecting with Naomi Watts and Yoko Ono, Robert Fox's Anna Wintour persuader, searching for John Cleese, editing with Karen Johnson and Susan Hill's suggestion of Greta Scacchi (White Mischief). She went on to dialing Lorne Michaels in, meeting Kate Moss, talking to Jack Nicholson off camera, watching John Waters' Polyester on a bus, a Gillian Armstrong idea and starting with Mick Jagger, all for the one-of-a-kind London artistic power player Michael White.

In Otto's captivatingly energetic debut feature, we see Rachel Ward, Barry Humphries, Wallace Shawn, Julian Sands, André Gregory, Richard O'Brien, Bill Oddie, Meryl Tankard, Nell Campbell, Jim Sharman, Robert Shaye, Nigel Planer, Miranda Darling, Michael Billington, Joshua White, Michael Morris,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »
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