5.6/10
6,684
88 user 22 critic

Neighbors (1981)

A quiet man's peaceful suburban lifestyle is threatened by the new, obnoxious couple that moves in next door.

Director:

John G. Avildsen

Writers:

Thomas Berger (novel), Larry Gelbart (screenplay)

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2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
John Belushi ... Earl Keese
Kathryn Walker ... Enid Keese
Cathy Moriarty ... Ramona
Dan Aykroyd ... Vic
Igors Gavon Igors Gavon ... Chic
Dru-Ann Chuckran Dru-Ann Chuckran ... Chic's Wife
Tim Kazurinsky ... Pa Greavy
Tino Insana ... Perry Greavy
P.L. Brown ... Police Officer #1
Henry Judd Baker ... Police Officer #2
Lauren-Marie Taylor ... Elaine Keese
Sherman G. Lloyd Sherman G. Lloyd ... Fireman #1 (DOC) (as Sherman Lloyd)
Bert Kittel Bert Kittel ... Fireman #2
J.B. Friend J.B. Friend ... Additional Fireman
Bernie Friedman Bernie Friedman ... Additional Fireman
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Storyline

One man's quiet suburban life takes a sickening lurch for the worse when a young couple move into the deserted house next door. From the word go it is obvious these are not the quiet professional types who *should* be living in such a nice street. As more and more unbelievable events unfold, our hero starts to question his own sanity... and those of his family. Written by Brad Jackson

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd are at it again! See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

18 December 1981 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Die verrückten Nachbarn See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$8,500,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$29,916,207
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This movie was made and released only a year or two after its source novel of the same name by Thomas Berger was first published in 1980. The book has also been adapted into a play by Eve Summer being first performed in 2007. See more »

Goofs

After Vic's dog Baby is heard barking in Enid and Earl's bedroom, we never hear or see the dog again, even after Vic, Ramona and Earl leave Bird Street. See more »

Quotes

[Earl is on the phone with Chic, the locksmith, and Vic is listening on the other line]
Earl Keese: Hello, Chic? It's Earl.
Chic: Earl! Earl who?
Earl Keese: Hey, no jokes, will ya? I need the name of that locksmith you used that time. I broke a key off. I got two lunatics locked in my basement.
Vic: [makes unintelligible noises]
Chic: What? What did you say?
Vic: [disguising voice] I said blow it out your ass, wimp.
Chic: Is somebody on this line?
Vic: Just you and me, asshole.
Earl Keese: [to Enid] That bastard's on the phone!
[...]
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Connections

Referenced in Psych: Dead Bear Walking (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Holiday In Cambodia
(uncredited)
Written by Jello Biafra
Performed by Dead Kennedys
Courtesy of Alternative Tentacles
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User Reviews

For those who like their comedy dark, it's great!
6 December 1999 | by cinefanSee all my reviews

As is evident from the many split decisions to be found on this site, "Neighbors" is not everyone's cup of tea. However, for those who have a taste for dark comedy, it is quite a good film. As has been stated numerous times, this film was a critical and box-office failure, and there were many tensions between Belushi and the director on set. Despite this turmoil, or maybe because of it, "Neighbors" has an authentically skewed, uncomfortable tone. This works in it's favor, however, considering the subject matter. As does the casting of Aykroyd and Belushi in the roles of tormentor and victim, respectively. This choice is probably most responsible for some's dislike of the film. Unfortunately, Belushi, near the end of his life, was being pigeon-holed as a crass, boorish "wild man" of comedy, mostly due to his turns in "National Lampoon's Animal House" and "1941." However, he was a fine comedic actor capable of great subtlety and fine nuance, which is why he consciously chose the role he did (the film was originally conceived with John in the role of Vic). This film and many scenes from his first year on "Saturday Night Live" grandly illustrate his range. Likewise, Dan Aykroyd was quite an intense performer back then - in many "SNL" scenes (again, mostly from the first year), Aykroyd paraded out a variety of high-strung bizarre characters which practically vibrated with energy... indeed, though he did not end up playing it, the role of "D-Day" in "Animal House" was conceived with Dan in mind. Here, he really gets to cut loose and, as always, his and John's interplay are priceless. Not to be overlooked is the incredibly hot Cathy Moriarty who, not to take away from her own formidable comedic prowess, was quite the piece of ass (she was also stunning in "Raging Bull"). This is by no means a perfect film, and it does slow in spots, but it is by no means the disaster many make it out to be. See for yourself... love it or hate it, at least admire it for trying to be different. Funny stuff!


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