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Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981)

Mad Max 2 (original title)
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2:40 | Trailer
In the post-apocalyptic Australian wasteland, a cynical drifter agrees to help a small, gasoline-rich community escape a horde of bandits.

Director:

George Miller

Writers:

Terry Hayes (screenplay by), George Miller (screenplay by) | 1 more credit »
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728 ( 735)
8 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Mel Gibson ... Max
Bruce Spence ... The Gyro Captain
Michael Preston ... Pappagallo (as Mike Preston)
Max Phipps ... The Toadie
Vernon Wells ... Wez
Kjell Nilsson ... The Humungus
Emil Minty ... The Feral Kid
Virginia Hey ... Warrior Woman
William Zappa ... Zetta
Arkie Whiteley ... The Captain's Girl
Steve J. Spears Steve J. Spears ... Mechanic
Syd Heylen Syd Heylen ... Curmudgeon
Moira Claux Moira Claux ... Big Rebecca
David Downer David Downer ... Nathan
David Slingsby David Slingsby ... Quiet Man
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Storyline

Wandering the deserted highways of an energy-starved dystopian Australia after eradicating the Night Rider's followers in Mad Max (1979), the former patrolman, Max Rockatansky, finds himself roaming the endless wasteland scavenging for food and precious petrol. Suddenly, in the scorched wilderness, the hungry for fuel Max chances upon a small oil refinery; however, the place is under siege by Lord Humungus' barbarian horde of biker warlords, hell-bent on destruction and mayhem. Now, to get his hands on as much gas as he can carry, "Mad" Max will have to provide the defenceless community with a powerful truck to transport the gasoline to safety; nevertheless, this is easier said than done. Is Max, the battle-scarred Road Warrior, up to the task? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

When all that's left is one last chance, pray that he's still out there ... somewhere! See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During the scene after Max has been forced off the road and left for dead by Wez, Max is seen dragging himself along the ground due to his injuries as Brian May's music is heard. This scene reflects another scene from Mad Max (1979), after Max has been ambushed by The Toecutter and Bubba Zanetti, and left for dead as he drags himself to his car to give pursuit. For the sequel, composer Brian May re-uses the same score of the scene mentioned in the original film. Only now, it is composed with a much slower tempo, and with a more melancholy feel to it. See more »

Goofs

When Wez wheelies his bike away from Mundi Mundi lookout, the Golden Youth is played by a female stand-in wearing black leather cuffs on his/her biceps, which he doesn't wear in any other scene. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: My life fades. The vision dims. All that remains are memories. I remember a time of chaos... ruined dreams... this wasted land. But most of all, I remember The Road Warrior. The man we called "Max." To understand who he was, you have to go back to another time... when the world was powered by the black fuel... and the desert sprouted great cities of pipe and steel. Gone now... swept away. For reasons long forgotten, two mighty warrior tribes went to war, and touched off a blaze ...
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Alternate Versions

The opening chase sequence jumps straight into the action with the camera pulling out of the V8's supercharger. This scene was originally shot with Max driving past a farm that Wez and others were ransacking, the bodies of the owners hanging dead from a tree. Seeing Max they all ran to their vehicles and gave chase and there were several cars. The camera then panned out of the car's charger to signify a short passage of time and THEN the scene is as we know it with just Wez and two cars still still in pursuit due to the Interceptor's power. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Step Brothers (2008) See more »

User Reviews

 
on the Road Again with Mad Max and his Dog
6 August 2005 | by BogmeisterSee all my reviews

But most of all, I remember the Road Warrior. By this time, many people have forgotten that this set the standard for kinetic action on the roadways. The memories fade as the years go by, new action films are released, such as "Speed"(94), which seem to set new standards. But, it's not really the case. The Road Warrior has yet to be bested, and no amount of money, computer technology or loud noises will ever accomplish the deed. Nothing will ever capture the apocalyptic intensity or, most of all, the sheer elegance of combat on the roads, as depicted here. "Raiders of the Lost Ark"(81), for example, captured a more frenetic goofy-style action, also relentless, but not with the level of tension. It's exciting, sure, but it doesn't tie your stomach up in knots, leaving you drained yet begging for more.

The sequel to "Mad Max"(79) - also a unique, tense experience - begins with an unusual prologue, giving the viewers a historical background on only half the screen. We are set up for a bombastic adventure, created as a new mythology for our perusal. Iconic figures abound, beginning with Max (Gibson) himself, of course. Here is the quintessential wandering loner hero/cowboy/samurai: he is striking - damaged both physically & mentally - but an ultimate survivor. Here are his foes: a scarred, massively-muscled atomic-age conqueror and his dogs, garbed in battle-dress for instant death and destruction. Here is his conscience: the last vestiges of civilization grouped in a makeshift fort for a final gasp of decency. When these three factions clash, it's the end of the world as we know it. Welcome to the new world of The Road Warrior.

The Road Warrior influenced the sub-genre of post-holocaust science fiction throughout the eighties. There were numerous imitators, mostly low-budget efforts, and none of them came close to succeeding at this level. I hope not too many people continue to forget where it all began for this thrilling corner of the sci-fi adventure genre. It is to our downfall and regret that we forget.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Australia

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 May 1982 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,527,864, 23 May 1982

Gross USA:

$23,667,907

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$23,667,907
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (heavily cut)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo (35 mm prints)| 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)

Color:

Black and White (archive footage)| Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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