James Bond is assigned to find a missing British vessel, equipped with a weapons encryption device and prevent it from falling into enemy hands.

Director:

John Glen

Writers:

Richard Maibaum (screenplay by), Michael G. Wilson (screenplay by)
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1,113 ( 2,218)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 2 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Roger Moore ... James Bond
Carole Bouquet ... Melina
Topol ... Columbo
Lynn-Holly Johnson ... Bibi
Julian Glover ... Kristatos
Cassandra Harris ... Lisl
Jill Bennett ... Brink
Michael Gothard ... Locque
John Wyman ... Kriegler
Jack Hedley ... Havelock
Lois Maxwell ... Moneypenny
Desmond Llewelyn ... Q
Geoffrey Keen ... Minister of Defence
Walter Gotell ... General Gogol
James Villiers ... Tanner
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Storyline

After disposing of a familiar looking face, Bond is sent to recover a communication device, known as an A.T.A.C., which went down with a British spy ship as it sunk. Bond must hurry though, as the Russians are also out for this device. On his travels, he also meets Melina Havelock, whose parents were brutally murdered. Bond also encounters Aristotle Kristatos and Milos Colombo. Each of them are accusing the other of having links with with the Russians. Bond must team up with Melina, solve who the true ally is, and find the A.T.A.C. before it's too late. Written by simon

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Bond for the ladies in For Your Eyes Only See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vehicles featured include: two Lotus Esprit Turbo 2.2 sportscars, one white, and one copper metallic to contrast against the white snow, after the other is blown up; a yellow Citroën 2CV fitted out with a Citroën GS 4-cylinder boxer engine, for a drive in the country to escape two black Peugeot 504 sedans; black Yamaha XJ 500 and Yamaha 500 XT motorcycles; Hector Gonzales' black, yellow, and white Cessna U206G Stationair Amphibian seaplane; a remote controlled Universal Exports red and white Mi6 Augusta and Bell 206B Jet Ranger helicopter; Aris Kristatos' black Everflex top white Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow or Silver Wraith II car; a white two-person Neptune lock-out submersible exploratory mini-submarine; a PZL-3A, PZL Mi-2, Polish Mil Mi-2 standard Soviet light helicopter; Colombo's yacht, the S.S. Colombina; the archaeological research vessel Triana; a black and yellow one-person atmospheric submersible Osel Mantis mini-submarine; the fishing trawler electronic surveillance spy ship H.M.S. St. Georges, containing one A.T.A.C. device; Emile Locque's silver Mercedes-Benz 280SE; a black GP Beach Buggy; and Aris Kristatos' motor yacht, the Santa Mavra. See more »

Goofs

The Mercedes-Benz that Locque flees in after blowing up the warehouse is a type W114 or W115 (also called "/8") with stickers next to the tail lights to make it appear like the type W116 (the first "S-Class") which it becomes in the subsequent scenes. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Vicar: Mr. Bond, Mr. Bond. I'm so glad I caught you. Your office called. They're sending a helicopter to pick you up. Some sort of emergency.
James Bond: It usually is. Thank you.
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Crazy Credits

James Bond will return in OCTOPUSSY See more »

Alternate Versions

Video prints prior to the early 1990's had the opening and closing titles formatted to fit the screen. Current video prints have the opening and closing titles letterboxed. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Nation's Favourite Bond Song (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

James Bond Theme
Music by Monty Norman
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User Reviews

Moore's finest Bond.
22 September 2001 | by sibisi73See all my reviews

'For Your Eyes Only' starts the tenure of John Glen at the helm of the Bond series. He had worked previously on many of the Bond movies but during the eighties he directed all 5 Bond movies, and with the exception of 'A View To A Kill', they are up there with the best of the whole series. Certainly 'For Your Eyes Only' and the follow up, 'Octopussy' are the best of the Moore years, and I don't think it would be overstating it to say that Glen may have single handedly saved the franchise.

By the end of the 1970s Bond had turned from Ian Fleming's masterspy into an entirely comic book creation, culminating in the preposterous shenanigans of 'Moonraker' in 1979. At the start of a new decade a new style is clearly apparent, with a back to basics story that actually involves some spying, and a genuine threat to world peace. It's pushing it to say that the story is believable, but it is realistically told and is certainly a more adult affair than the previous efforts.

The film starts with the final nail in the coffin for Blofeld. After years of legal wrangling over who had the rights to the character the filmmakers decided to show that they didn't need him anyway and unceremoniously dumped him once and for all. We are also immediately put in the mood for a far more serious Bond when he visits his late wife's grave, an unusual moment, not least because the movies rarely referenced previous actors in the role. Here we are reminded that Moore wasn't playing Bond at the time of his marriage. That serious tone pervades throughout the movie, with less wisecracking than usual, and a subdued villain, at odds with the expected megalomaniac we are used to. But the film is all the better for it. There are some fantastic action set-pieces including a chase in a Citroen 2CV, and a ski chase that tops even that of 'On Her Majesty's Secret Service', along with a tense finale that is literally a cliffhanger. Bond is actually forced to use his wits, and much of the action and escapes are less contrived than one would expect. It's also good to see (after 'The Spy Who Loved Me' and 'Moonraker') that the filmmakers have tried to get back to Fleming's Bond, with many ideas lifted from the original stories. The scene with Bond and Melina dragged behind the speedboat, for example, is taken directly from the novel of 'Live And Let Die', and many characters appear in Fleming's short story of the same name.

Add to the mix a fine cast, notably Carole Bouquet as another strong character in the list of 'Bond women', and you have a satisfying and thrilling entry in the series.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

Spanish | English | Greek | Italian

Release Date:

26 June 1981 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

For Your Eyes Only See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$28,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,834,967, 28 June 1981

Gross USA:

$54,812,802

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$54,813,222
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Eon Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo | DTS (3.1 Surround)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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