6.7/10
15,325
130 user 66 critic

Dragonslayer (1981)

A young wizarding apprentice is sent to kill a dragon which has been devouring girls from a nearby kingdom.

Director:

Matthew Robbins
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Peter MacNicol ... Galen
Caitlin Clarke ... Valerian
Ralph Richardson ... Ulrich
John Hallam ... Tyrian
Peter Eyre ... Casiodorus Rex
Albert Salmi ... Greil
Sydney Bromley ... Hodge
Chloe Salaman ... Princess Elspeth
Emrys James Emrys James ... Valerian's Father
Roger Kemp Roger Kemp ... Horsrik
Ian McDiarmid ... Brother Jacopus
Ken Shorter Ken Shorter ... Henchman
Jason White Jason White ... Henchman
Yolande Palfrey Yolande Palfrey ... Victim
Douglas Cooper Douglas Cooper ... Urlander
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Storyline

A King has made a pact with a dragon where he sacrfices virgins to it, and the dragon leaves his kingdom alone. An old wizard, and his keen young apprentice volunteer to kill the dragon and attempt to save the next virgin in line, the King's own daughter. Written by Colin Tinto <cst@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

When dragons were real. See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

After the completion of principal shooting, a special effects team of eighty people at ILM studios in northern California worked eight months in producing 160 composite shots of the dragon. Chris Walas sculpted and operated the dragon head used for close-up shots. The model was animated by a combination of radio controls, cable controls, air bladders, levers and by hand, thus giving the illusion of a fully coordinated face with a wide range of expression. See more »

Goofs

When the solar eclipse takes place, the moon slides in front of the sun, from below. In real life, the moon moves from right to left (northern hemisphere) or left to right (southern hemisphere). However, as this may not take place on Earth, the placement/movement of astral bodies could certainly be quite different. Another explanation could be that this is not a natural eclipse. It seems to take a long time to occur, and clears as soon as the dragon is dead, suggesting it as an unnatural occurrence. See more »

Quotes

Horsrik: Now be it known throughout the kingdom that this maiden, having lawfully been chosen by a deed of fortune and destiny, shall hereby give up her life for the greater good of Urland! By this act shall be satisfied the powers that dwell underground! In gratitude of this sacrifice, His Majesty declares the father - a plowman - to be free of obligations for a period not to exceed five years! Duly ordained...
[...]
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Alternate Versions

The out-of-print NTSC laserdisc is the only uncut version of the film and is a valuable collector's item. See more »

User Reviews

 
Now THAT'S what I call a dragon!!!
30 June 2005 | by HaemovoreRexSee all my reviews

With the name Disney attached to a sword and sorcery/fantasy romp, many genre purists might be filled with immediate consternation as they visualise in horror the possible 'cute' connotations.

Fortuitously, the understandable apprehension that this may well induce actually proves to be entirely unfounded however, as this movie is about as far from Pete's Dragon or any other Disney fare as is humanly imaginable!

What we do have here, is an excellent movie with top notch production values, awesome special effects, a fine cast, and a very dark story.

The dragon itself is without doubt the best ever committed to celluloid (a much better design than the CGI one in Dragonheart) and proves to be hugely menacing and destructive as it incinerates everything in it's path.

The actors to, all put in excellent performances and it's particularly great to see such a fine piece of casting in the form of the late great Sir Ralph Richardson as the wizard Ulrich. In fact for such a role there has surely never been a more appropriate choice of actor other than of course, Peter Jackson casting Sir Ian McKellen to play Gandalf in the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

For fans of sword & sorcery and fantasy movies in general, this really is an absolute must see!


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 June 1981 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Dragonslayer See more »

Filming Locations:

North Wales, Wales, UK See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$18,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,407,939, 28 June 1981

Gross USA:

$14,110,013

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$14,110,013
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Vistasonic (some 35 mm prints)| Dolby (35 mm prints)| 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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