6.9/10
23,590
116 user 41 critic

Arthur (1981)

PG | | Comedy, Romance | 17 July 1981 (USA)
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2:08 | Trailer

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Arthur is a happy drunk with no pretensions at any ambition. He is also the heir to a vast fortune which he is told will only be his if he marries Susan. He does not love Susan, but she ... See full summary »

Director:

Steve Gordon

Writer:

Steve Gordon
Won 2 Oscars. Another 9 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Dudley Moore ... Arthur Bach
Liza Minnelli ... Linda Marolla
John Gielgud ... Hobson
Geraldine Fitzgerald ... Martha Bach
Jill Eikenberry ... Susan Johnson
Stephen Elliott Stephen Elliott ... Burt Johnson
Ted Ross ... Bitterman
Barney Martin ... Ralph Marolla
Thomas Barbour Thomas Barbour ... Stanford Bach
Anne De Salvo ... Gloria
Marjorie Barnes Marjorie Barnes ... Hooker
Dillon Evans Dillon Evans ... Plaza Maitre D'
Maurice Copeland Maurice Copeland ... Uncle Peter
Justine Johnston Justine Johnston ... Aunt Pearl
Paul Vincent Paul Vincent ... Plaza Waiter
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Storyline

Arthur is a happy drunk with no pretensions at any ambition. He is also the heir to a vast fortune which he is told will only be his if he marries Susan. He does not love Susan, but she will make something of him the family expects. Arthur proposes but then meets a girl with no money, with whom he could easily fall in love. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Not everyone who drinks is a poet, some of us drink because we're not. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 July 1981 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Arturo, el millonario seductor See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$7,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,719,534, 19 July 1981, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$95,461,682
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

After shooting the scene where Arthur gets beaten up by his would-be father-in-law, Dudley Moore was still wearing his tattered costume and bloody make-up when he turned to his then-girlfriend Susan Anton (who was nearly eight and a half inches taller than him) in a Waldorf-Astoria elevator and said, "Susan, I told you I'd be home, why wouldn't you believe me?" The other elevator passengers were aghast. See more »

Goofs

When Arthur exits his race car to talk to Hobson he takes a sip from a flask. In the next shot the flask is gone even though his arm never moved. See more »

Quotes

Arthur: All I can tell you is, I wish I had a dime for every dime I had.
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Connections

Referenced in Spider-Man (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

Strangers in the Night
(uncredited)
Music by Bert Kaempfert
Performed by Dudley Moore
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Still a Charmer a Quarter Century Later Especially for the Well-Missed Talents of Moore and Gielgud
1 August 2006 | by EUyeshimaSee all my reviews

This 1981 comedy still sparkles thanks to the combined efforts of writer/director Steve Gordon and stars Dudley Moore and John Gielgud. Sadly, Gordon, only in his early forties, died soon after completing this, his only feature film. It's an especially unfortunate loss since he shows a truly deft hand at character-driven farce that makes the whole film irresistible. It plays almost like a 1930's-style screwball comedy revamped for contemporary tastes. The plot centers on Arthur Bach, a drunken, diminutive millionaire playboy who is at risk of losing his $750 million inheritance if he doesn't marry the dowdy and boring Susan Johnson, an heiress handpicked by his old-money father and dotty grandmother. Of course, he doesn't love her and by chance, runs into Linda Marolla, a working-class waitress (and of course, aspiring actress) after she pilfers a Bergdorf Goodman tie for her father.

The standard complications ensue but in a most endearing way with loads of alcohol-fueled slapstick executed with classic élan by Moore. That he makes such a spoiled character likable is a credit not only to his comic talents but to Gielgud's feisty, acidic turn as Hobson, Arthur's devoted but reality-grounded valet. It's the type of role he could play in his sleep, but Gielgud makes Hobson such a truly memorable character that his fate in the film brings a welcome injection of poignancy in the proceedings. In probably her most likable film role, Liza Minnelli hands the picture to her male co-stars by toning down her usual razzle-dazzle personality and making Linda quite genuine in motivation.

A pre-"LA Law" Jill Eikenberry plays Susan just at the right passive-aggressive note, while Barney Martin (Jerry's dad on "Seinfeld") steals all his scenes as Linda's slovenly father Ralph. The one fly in the ointment is veteran actress Geraldine Fitzgerald, who overdoes the eccentricities of the grandmother. And I have to admit that I still can't stand the very dated, overplayed Christopher Cross song that inevitably won the Oscar for that year's best song. Unfortunately, the 1997 DVD, certainly in need of remastering, has no extras worth noting except some photos and production notes.


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