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Sharon Stone movies: 10 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Basic Instinct,’ ‘Casino,’ ‘Total Recall’

Sharon Stone movies: 10 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Basic Instinct,’ ‘Casino,’ ‘Total Recall’
Many first spied Sharon Stone when she made her wordless big-screen debut in 1980, billed as Pretty Girl on the Train, in Woody Allen’s “Stardust Memories.” She does leave an impression while blowing a kiss from behind a train window. As Stone has said, “I gave it my best shot to melt that sucker.”

SEEWoody Allen movies: Top 25 greatest films ranked worst to best

She would come to define a ‘90s brand of sex symbol, one who was more in control of her fate in films and not afraid to enjoy sex as well as dabbling in lethal behavior. Her signature performance remains 1992’s “Basic Instinct,” as a bisexual psychopath with likely murderous intent. It is hard not to acknowledge that the quality of her films has been up and down, resulting in nine Razzie nominations, including three wins. But she compensated when she poured her soul into Ginger McKenna,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sharon Stone movies: 10 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Sharon Stone movies: 10 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Many first spied Sharon Stone when she made her wordless big-screen debut in 1980, billed as Pretty Girl on the Train, in Woody Allen’s “Stardust Memories.” She does leave an impression while blowing a kiss from behind a train window. As Stone has said, “I gave it my best shot to melt that sucker.”

She would come to define a ‘90s brand of sex symbol, one who was more in control of her fate in films and not afraid to enjoy sex as well as dabbling in lethal behavior. Her signature performance remains 1992’s “Basic Instinct,” as a bisexual psychopath with likely murderous intent. It is hard not to acknowledge that the quality of her films has been up and down, resulting in nine Razzie nominations, including three wins. But she compensated when she poured her soul into Ginger McKenna, a booze-addicted, me-first ex-hooker married to Robert De Niro’s
See full article at Gold Derby »

Berlinale 2019: ‘Max mon amour’

Berlinale 2019: ‘Max mon amour’
By Alex DeleonCharlotte Rampling in the Festival SpotlightThe first film seen at the festival in the homage to Charlotte Rampling retro was somewhat of a disappointment. I had seen this picture when it first came out in Japan and was favorably impressed at the time by its outrageous sense of the absurd, especially as made by a serious A level Japanese director like Nagisa Oshima (died 2013 at age 80). This time around the humor, at least for me, did not hold up and I was rather bored most of the way.

Today it is of little more than passing historical interest

There is, however, an interesting background to this very offbeat Franco-Japanese co-production from the year 1986 by which timeNagisa Ôshima was regarded as a first class Japanese iconoclast. Outside of Japan he was highly regarded in France where his mainstream hardcore porno films In the realm of the Senses (1976) and Empire of Passion
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

The Simpsons Season 30 Episode 12 Review: The Girl on the Bus

Lisa Simpson offers her seat at the dinner table to the Girl on the Bus in The Simpsons, season 30, episode 12.

This The Simpsons review contains spoilers.

The Simpsons: Season 30 Episode 12

The Simpsons Season 30, Episode 12, presents a French farce on "The Girl on the Bus," and Lisa puts the fab in fabrication. The Simpsons' middle child tries to obscure her family but winds up exposing both the series and family's most recent flaws in a funny and effective episode.

The Simpsons' "The Girl on the Bus" starts with hardly any theme music at all and a couch gag that's over before it starts, disintegrating the family before Lisa gets a chance to let her sculptor father reconstruct it. That's one of the lies Lisa commits to when she first drops into the character she always wants to be. The opening sequence is reminiscent of Woody Allen's Stardust Memories,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Berlinale 2019. Lineup

  • MUBI
Ghost Town AnthologyThe titles for the 69th Berlin International Film Festival are being announced in anticipation of the event running February 7-17, 2019. We will update the program as new films are revealed.COMPETITIONThe Ground Beneath My FeetThe Golden Glove (Faith Akin, Germany/France)By the Grace of GodThe Kindness of StrangersI Was at Home, but A Tale of Three SistersGhost Town Anthology (Denis Côté, Canada)Berlinale SPECIALGully Boy (Zoya Akhtar, India)BrechtWatergate (Charles Ferguson, USA)Panorama 201937 Seconds (Hikari (Mitsuyo Miyazaki), Japan)Dafne (Federico Bondi, Italy)The Day After I'm Gone (Nimrod Eldar, Israel)A Dog Called Money (Seamus Murphy, Ireland/UK)Waiting for the CarnivalChainedFlatland (Jenna Bass, South Africa/Germany/Luxembourg)Greta (Armando Praça, Brazil)Hellhole (Bas Devos, Belgium/Netherlands)Jessica Forever (Caroline Poggi, Jonathan Vinel, France)AcidMid90s (Jonah Hill, USA) Family MembersMonos (Alejandro Landes, Columbia/Argentina/Netherlands/Germany/Denmark/Sweden/Uruguay) O Beautiful Night (Xaver Böhm,
See full article at MUBI »

Charlotte Rampling To Receive Honorary Berlin Golden Bear; Macao Winners — Global Briefs

  • Deadline
Charlotte Rampling To Receive Honorary Berlin Golden Bear; Macao Winners — Global Briefs
Charlotte Rampling (45 Years) will receive an Honorary Golden Bear at the 2019 Berlin International Film Festival. The festival will also present a homage to the feted British actress’s career: movies will include The Damned, The Night Porter, The Verdict, Swimming Pool and Stardust Memories. Rampling presided over the festival’s jury in in 2006 and in 2015 she won the Silver Bear for Best Actress for 45 Years, for which she was also Oscar-nominated. “I’m very happy that this year’s Homage is dedicated to the sublime actress Charlotte Rampling,” said Berlinale Director Dieter Kosslick. “She is an icon of unconventional and exciting cinema.” The prolific Rampling, whose career spans six decades, has recently played in Red Sparrow, The Little Stranger and Michel Blanc’s Kiss & Tell. She will next be seen in Paul Verhoeven’s film Benedetta, scheduled for release in 2019.

The third International Film Festival and Awards Macao handed
See full article at Deadline »

Berlin Film Festival to honour Charlotte Rampling

Berlin Film Festival to honour Charlotte Rampling
Rampling won a SIlver Bear at Berlinale in 2015.

Actress Charlotte Rampling is to be awarded the Honorary Golden Bear for lifetime achievement at the 69th Berlin International Film Festival (Feb 7-17).

Berlin will also host a homage to her work, including The Night Porter (1974), directed by Liliana Cavani, François Ozon’s The Swimming Pool (2003) and Woody Allen’s Stardust Memories (1980).

Other notable other performances in a career spanning more than 100 film and television roles include Luchino Visconti’s The Damned, the Oscar-nominated The Wings of the Dove, TV series London Spy and Andrew Haigh’s 45 Years, which won Rampling a
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin Film Festival: Charlotte Rampling to Receive Honorary Golden Bear

  • Variety
Berlin Film Festival: Charlotte Rampling to Receive Honorary Golden Bear
Oscar-nominated actress Charlotte Rampling, whose career has spanned more than 100 film and television roles, will be honored with a special Golden Bear at the upcoming Berlin Film Festival.

The fest will also pay homage to Rampling by screening a selection of her work, including Sidney Lumet’s “The Verdict” (1982), Francois Ozon’s “Swimming Pool” (2003) and Andrea Pallaoro’s “Hannah” (2017). The honorary Golden Bear will be presented to the veteran performer Feb. 14 at a ceremony featuring a showing of Liliana Cavani’s “The Night Porter” (1974).

“I’m very happy that this year’s homage is dedicated to the sublime actress Charlotte Rampling,” said Dieter Kosslick, the director of the Berlinale. “She is an icon of unconventional and exciting cinema.”

Rampling won the Silver Bear in 2015 for her performance in “45 Years” opposite Tom Courtenay; she also received an Academy Award nomination for the role. She served as president of the Berlinale
See full article at Variety »

Why Original Suspiria Star Jessica Harper Returned for the Remake

Don Kaye Nov 1, 2018

The star of the original cult classic Suspiria reveals how she came to star in the newly released remake.

Sometimes all it takes is one movie to immortalize an actor or actress for all time, and in the case of Jessica Harper, she has two: her 1974 screen debut in Brian De Palma’s cult classic, Phantom of the Paradise, and her lead role as dancer Suzy Bannion in Italian horror auteur Dario Argento’s 1977 genre classic, Suspiria.

Harper has a solid legacy of other work behind her as well, including roles in movies such as Stardust Memories, My Favorite Year and Safe, plus appearances on TV series like It’s Garry Shandling’s Show, Tales from the Crypt and Crossing Jordan. She’s also written a dozen children’s books and recorded seven albums of children’s music. But to a certain audience, she’ll always be
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Hannah' Review: Charlotte Rampling Drama Runs Gamut From Cold to Subzero

'Hannah' Review: Charlotte Rampling Drama Runs Gamut From Cold to Subzero
It's not easy to watch the slow deterioration of a good person, especially a woman as intelligent and complex as Hannah (Charlotte Rampling). Her husband (André Wilms) has been carted off to prison in their native Belgium for reasons unknown. But Hannah carries on, trying to live life as she knows it. Then life starts to squeeze her out.

At least, that's the premise of this slow, deliberate film, directed and co-written by Andrea Pallaoro, following a striking 2013 debut with Medeas. He refuses to coddle audiences or fill in the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Woody Allen's French distributor defends filmmaker, denounces 'wave of hate'

Stéphane Célérier is one of the first high-profile industry players to speak out in the director’s defence.

Source: Wiki Commons

Woody Allen

Mars Films chief Stéphane Célérier, the long-time distributor of Woody Allen’s work in France, has publicly denounced the media’s treatment of the director over allegations he molested his adopted daughter.

In a bold move, Célérier, who rarely speaks to the press, voiced his shock at the coverage of Allen by the world’s media and on the social networks, in an editorial in French weekly news magazine Le Point.

He is one of the first high-profile industry players connected to Allen to speak out in the director’s defence.

“I have been shocked by the wave of hate provoked by the Woody Allen affair, particularly in the United States and on the social networks, and by the lack of rigor by certain media outlets and the pack which condemns without looking into the full
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Ezra Swerdlow, ‘First Wives Club’ Producer, Dies at 64

  • The Wrap
Ezra Swerdlow, ‘First Wives Club’ Producer, Dies at 64
Ezra Swerdlow, the New York-based producer behind films like “The First Wives Club,” died last week at the age of 64, according to a spokesman from ICM Partners. Born and raised on Long Island,” Swerdlow became one of the most prolific producers in New York’s movie industry after getting his start as a location scout on Woody Allen’s 1979 film “Stardust Memories.” From there, he became a unit manager on Martin Scorsese’s “The King of Comedy” before briefly moving to Los Angeles to work with Mel Brooks on “Spaceballs,” on which he was a co-producer. Swerdlow’s producing career ignited in the...
See full article at The Wrap »

Ezra Swerdlow Dies: New York Producer Of ‘Wag The Dog’ & ‘Too Big To Fail’ Was 64

Ezra Swerdlow Dies: New York Producer Of ‘Wag The Dog’ & ‘Too Big To Fail’ Was 64
Ezra N. Swerdlow, a New York producer whose credits included Stardust Memories, Arthur, The King of Comedy, Wag the Dog and Spaceballs, has died. He was 64. He passed January 23 in Boston from complications from pancreatic cancer and Als. Swerdlow was known as a fair, compassionate and talented producer who put the film first and looked out for both the filmmaker and the crew. He grew up in Great Neck, Long Island. He studied political theory at Rutgers and seemed on a…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Charlotte Rampling on controversial Oscar comments, Woody Allen and Luchino Visconti

Charlotte Rampling on controversial Oscar comments, Woody Allen and Luchino Visconti
“I got annoyed by Spike Lee. That’s all.”

Source: Wiki Commons

Charlotte Rampling

Charlotte Rampling was at the international Film Festival Rotterdam this week for the screening of Andrea Pallor’s Hannah.

In an interview with Screen International, she reflected on her work with Luchino Visconti and Woody Allen; spoke of her continuing pride in The Night Porter, expressed regret over her controversial remarks about the lack of black nominees in the 2016 Oscars, and explained why she didn’t want to discuss the #MeToo Movement.

Rampling again expressed her regret over “racist to whites” comments two years ago on an early morning radio show during the promotion campaign for 45 Years, for which she was nominated for an Oscar. “It was very early in the morning and everyone was asking questions about that. It was not a very sensible thing to say but I was very tired. My husband died two months before,” Rampling said on stage
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Wonder Wheel’ Production Designer On The Artist Who Has Breathed New Life Into Woody Allen’s Films

‘Wonder Wheel’ Production Designer On The Artist Who Has Breathed New Life Into Woody Allen’s Films
Having worked with the prolific Woody Allen on over 30 films since 1980’s Stardust Memories, three-time Oscar-nominated production designer Santo Loquasto is well-acquainted with the writer/director’s likes and dislikes, his aesthetic preferences, and his general approach to storytelling—which has made the introduction of a new collaborator in recent years all the more exciting. With Café Society, released last year, Allen brought three-time Oscar-winning cinematographer V…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Funhouse (1981)

  • DailyDead
Everyone needs an escape from time to time. A place apart from reality, where the strange whisper with the miraculous, and cheap trinkets are bartered with greasy denizens of the night. What better place to set a horror film than the carnival, where the potential for mystery awaits around every crimson tent and distorted mirror? If you’re so inclined, step right up and buy a ticket to The Funhouse (1981), the late Tobe Hooper’s wonderful tribute to the seedy shadowed world of carnies, caramel apples, and Universal monsters.

Released in March by Universal, The Funhouse underperformed at the box office, but critics (including Gene Siskel) admired it for focusing on suspense and thrills rather than gruesome mayhem. In a landscape littered with severed limbs and phallically inclined urban legends, Mr. Hooper used his genius to once again showcase the underbelly of the American psyche, this time with a major studio’s dollars.
See full article at DailyDead »

C.H.U.D. – The Blu Review

Review by Roger Carpenter

Made at the height of the creature feature resurgence popularized by films like The Howling, An American Werewolf in London, Wolfen, Humanoids from the Deep, and The Boogens, C.H.U.D. (1984) was a (very) low budget film that was briefly popular upon its release and became a staple of the mid-80’s video stores that seemed to pop up like weeds around that time. We tend to throw around terms like “cult classic” a little too lightly nowadays. I don’t think C.H.U.D. qualifies as a genuine “cult classic,” but the film certainly has legs over three decades plus since its original release.

Perhaps those “legs” have something to do with the coverage from the popular Fangoria magazine during production of the film. Or maybe it had to do with the schlocky but nonetheless horrific rubber monster suits worn for the CHUDs (actually foam latex) to go along
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Norman Review

Author: Stefan Pape

Quietly, Richard Gere is consistently making rather good movies, telling interesting stories and taking on nuanced, intriguing roles. From The Benefactor to Arbitrage (let’s just forget The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel for now) – he’s tackling intimate character studies, and his latest, Joseph Cedar’s Norman, is no different.

Gere plays the eponymous protagonist, a professional chancer and over-enthused fixer – only problem is, nobody will actually let him get close enough to fix anything. Until he meets Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), an Israeli politician spending some time in New York, touched by Norman’s offer to buy him a pair of shoes. Three years pass, and Eshel is now an influential world leader, as the Prime Minister of his native country, and when he returns to the States to meet the President, Norman shows up at a function – and they remember each other well. To have
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Cannes Review: ‘Redoubtable’ Offers a Playful Pastiche on the Re-Radicalization of Jean-Luc Godard

It’s more Pastiche du Godard than Histoire(s) du Godard in Michel Hazanavicius’ Redoubtable and that’s not a bad thing. The director’s slight but surprisingly playful account of nouvelle vague maestro Jean-Luc Godard’s marriage to actress Anne Wiazemsky and his re-radicalization in the late 1960s has the potential to infuriate the more devout of Godard followers but there is plenty of good-hearted goading and creative homage to savor for the less pedantic fan.

Honing in on a tumultuous time for Godard and his adoptive France, Hazanavicius charts the relationship between him and Wiazemsky from beginning — on the set of his 1967 film La Chinoise — to end, taking in the 1968 protests and subsequent student movement (“I like the movement, not the students,” he later exclaims) as well as Godard’s own abstract departures from his previous filmmaking methods. It marks a welcome return for the director (Michel that
See full article at The Film Stage »

On my radar: Charlotte Rampling’s cultural highlights

The actor reveals her favourite Parisian hangouts, her love of timeless, authentic places, and the book that’s teaching her to understand cats

Born in Sturmer, Essex, Charlotte Rampling was brought up in Gibraltar, France and Spain. After briefly working as a model she turned to acting, appearing in Georgy Girl (1966), The Damned (1969), The Night Porter (1974), Woody Allen’s Stardust Memories (1980) and several François Ozon films, including Swimming Pool (2003). In 2015 she won a number of awards for her role in Andrew Haigh’s 45 Years. Rampling has been nominated four times for France’s César awards, winning once. She was made an OBE in 2000, and received France’s Légion d’Honneur in 2002. Her TV work includes Dexter, Broadchurch and London Spy. Her new autobiography, Who I Am, is published by Icon and on 27 May she discusses her life and career at the Hay festival.

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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