During World War II, the British must attack a German ship, but it's safe in neutral Goa. As a result, they send civilians: former soldiers who are about sixty years old.

Director:

Andrew V. McLaglen

Writers:

James Leasor (book), Reginald Rose (screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Gregory Peck ... Colonel Lewis Pugh
Roger Moore ... Captain Gavin Stewart
David Niven ... Colonel W. H. Grice
Trevor Howard ... Jack Cartwright
Barbara Kellerman ... 'Mrs. Cromwell'
Patrick Macnee ... Major Yogi Crossley
Kenneth Griffith ... Wilton
Patrick Allen ... Colin Mackenzie
Wolf Kahler ... Trompeta
Robert Hoffmann ... U-Boat Captain
Dan van Husen ... First Officer (as Dan Van Husen)
George Mikell George Mikell ... Ehrenfels Captain
Jürgen Andersen Jürgen Andersen ... First Officer (as Jurgen Andersen)
Bernard Archard ... Underhill
Martin Benson ... Mr. Montero
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Storyline

In March 1943, in World War II, the Germans use the neutral harbor of the Portuguese colony of Mormugoa to transmit information to a U-Boat about the allied ships to sink them in international waters. In Calcutta, the British Intelligence assigns Colonel Lewis Pugh (Gregory Peck) and Captain Gavin Stewart (Sir Roger Moore) to spy in Goa and they discover that there are three German vessels anchored in the area and the famous spy Trompeta (Wolf Kahler) is based in Goa. They kidnap Trompeta to interrogate him, but Lewis accidentally kills the spy after fighting with him in the runaway car. Meanwhile, Gavin has a one night stand with the gorgeous and elegant Mrs. Cromwell (Barbara Kellerman), who is the partner of Trompeta. They fail in their mission, but Lewis and Gavin convince their chief to use the veterans from Calcutta Light Horse led by the retired Colonel W.H. Grice (David Niven) to travel to Goa on board of the old ship Phoebe, pretending to be drunken businessmen on vacation. ... Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Taglines:

The Last Charge of the Calcutta Light Horse

Genres:

Action | History | War

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

As indicated in this movie's story and in the real-life mission, no medals, awards, or commendations were issued by the British Government for the successful raid on Goa. James Leasor's book "Boarding Party" states: "The authorities kept faith with the Light Horse over one particular promise. They would have no credit for what they volunteered to do, and there would be no medals. So closely was this last pledge adhered to, that the men who had willingly risked their lives and careers, at their own expense, to carry out a task which produced unparalleled benefits, were categorically refused the right to wear one of Britain's humbler issue medals of the Second World War, the 1939-45 Star." See more »

Goofs

Using a firearm not yet invented in World War II. See more »

Quotes

Mrs. Grice: A good wife does not pry.
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Crazy Credits

Closing credits: Although this film is based on the true exploits of certain members of The Calcutta Light Horse, some fictitious events and characters have been introduced and in those instances, any similarity to actual persons (living or dead) or to actual events is purely coincidental. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Inside the Tower (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Rule Britannia
(uncredited)
composed by Thomas Augustine Arne
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User Reviews

 
Very enjoyable tale
17 December 2004 | by Paul_JaySee all my reviews

Yes, Peck had a hard time with holding a British accent, Costner's Robin Hood didn't even try.

Yes, there were a bunch of older actors in it, it's about older characters.

No, it doesn't have an explosion a minute or a bunch of hard bodied guys or gorgeous babes, that's not what this movie is about and it doesn't need them.

It's about a bunch of geezer who, despite being a bit over the hill, still have some sense of adventure and a bit of fight left in them.

When viewed from that perspective this movie does the job very well.

It doesn't need the repeated and obviously fake explosions and computer generated torn body parts that seems to be the requisite for contemporary adventure films. It's a relatively subdued spinning of a yarn based (loosely, I suppose) on a true story.

It's heartwarming to watch the bunch of old soldiers (admitedly, not too much older than myself) pull it together one more time.

On one of those cold, bleak winter afternoons when you're feeling that you might have missed out on a few of life's adventures, watch this movie and let yourself think, maybe, just maybe there's still a chance to live them.


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Details

Country:

Switzerland | UK | USA

Language:

English | German | Portuguese

Release Date:

5 June 1981 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Sea Wolves See more »

Filming Locations:

Germany See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$12,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$220,181

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$220,181
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo

Color:

Color | Black and White (archive footage)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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