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‘Bernard And Huey’ Clip: Mae Whitman Tells The Truth In Her Art [Slamdance Exclusive]

That sound you’re hearing is coming from Park City, where movies big and small continue to unspool at the Slamdance Film Festival. And one of the most intriguing entries in the festival this year is the closing night film, “Bernard And Huey,” and today we’re excited to debut an exclusive clip from the movie.

Penned by Jules Feiffer (“Carnal Knowledge,” “Popeye“), directed by Slamdance co-founder Dan Mirvish, and starring Jim Rash, David Koechner, Sasha Alexander, Eka Darville, Richard Kind, Lauren Miller Rogen, Nancy Travis, Bellamy Young, and Mae Whitman, the film follows two friends who are reunited after twenty-five years, with their lives as complicated as ever.

Continue reading ‘Bernard And Huey’ Clip: Mae Whitman Tells The Truth In Her Art [Slamdance Exclusive] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Giving Movie Thanks (2017 Edition)

I’d imagine every one of us, despite our individual life situations, however privileged or difficult they may be, wouldn’t have too much trouble coming up with a pretty long list of people and circumstances for which to be grateful, during the upcoming week traditionally reserved for the expression of thanks as well as throughout the entirety of the year.

Even in our brave new world, where gratitude and humility and generosity of spirit often seem to be in short supply, at the mercy of greed, abuse of power, disregard for the rule of law, and megalomaniac self-interest cynically masquerading as an aggressive strain of nationalist, populist passion, there are good, everyday reasons to look around and take stock of blessings in one’s immediate surroundings.

And speaking specifically as one who has the privilege and opportunity to occasionally write about matters concerning the movies, and even a (very
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

C.O. 'Doc' Erickson dead at 93

C.O. 'Doc' Erickson dead at 93
The producer and production manager associated with Chinatown and Groundhog Day, died on Wednesday from heart complications.

Born on December 17,1923, C.O. ‘Doc’ Erickson was living in Las Vegas when he died from heart complications, according to The Gersh Agency.

Erickson began his career at Paramount Pictures, serving as production manager on five Alfred Hitchcock films during the mid-to-late 1950s, including Rear Window, To Catch A Thief, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much and Vertigo.

The producer left Paramount in the early 1960s to become John Huston’s associate producer on The Misfits, Freud, and 1967s Reflections In A Golden Eye.

He went on to serve as production manager on Joseph L Mankiewicz’s There Was A Crooked Man and also spent three years supervising film production for Brut Productions.

He would later become associated with Robert Evans on Chinatown, Players, Urban Cowboy, and Popeye.

Other producer-production credits include 55 Days At Peking, [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

C.O. ‘Doc’ Erickson, Alfred Hitchcock Associate, Dies at 93

C.O. ‘Doc’ Erickson, Alfred Hitchcock Associate, Dies at 93
Longtime motion picture producer and executive C.O. “Doc” Erickson, who worked on Alfred Hitchcock’s movies along with “Chinatown,” “Blade Runner,” and “Groundhog Day,” died Wednesday in Las Vegas due to heart complications. He was 93.

He began his career at Paramount Pictures, serving as production manager on five Hitchcock films: “Rear Window” (1954), “To Catch a Thief” (1955), “The Trouble with Harry” (1955), “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (1956), and “Vertigo” (1958).

He left Paramount to become John Huston’s associate producer on “The Misfits” (1961), “Freud” (1962), and “Reflections in a Golden Eye” (1967). He was production manager on Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s “There Was a Crooked Man…” (1970).

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Erickson spent three years supervising film production for Brut Productions and later became associated with Robert Evans on “Chinatown” (1974), “Players” (1979), “Urban Cowboy” (1980), and “Popeye” (1980). Other producer/production credits include “55 Days at Peking” (1963), “Magic” (1978), “Blade Runner” (1982), “Nicholas and Alexandra” (1971), “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” (1982), “The Lonely Guy” (1984), “Stuart Saves His Family” (1995), and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

"Popeye: Me Musical Nephews"

In honor of 'Father's Day', from SneakPeekTV, take a look @ the nephews of 'Popeye The Sailor', namely  'Peepeye', 'Poopeye', 'Pipeye' and 'Pupeye' in the cartoon short "Me Musical Nephews" (1942), directed by Seymour Kneitel and  voiced by Jack Mercer with his 'Popeye' voice sped up:

"...one night, the nephews are practicing playing their music while 'Popeye' is continually falling asleep. He tells them to get ready for bed so he can tell them a story. The nephews are unhappy with the short story , but are sent to bed anyway. 

"The nephews aren't so tired and eventually start playing music with various objects such as mattress springs, suspenders, and medicine bottles. Popeye eventually hears the racket and destroys the radio trying to find what's causing the noise.

"He soon finds out it's coming from the nephews and tries to catch them in the act...."

Click the
See full article at SneakPeek »

Wamg Interview – Circus Legend Hovey Burgess of Circus Flora

Always exciting and always affordable, Circus Flora is the best circus in America and the best show in town. Circus Flora’s new production Time Flies takes place under the air-conditioned red-and-white Big Top tent in Grand Center next to Powell Symphony Hall (corner of Grand Boulevard and Samuel Shepard Drive.) Time Flies runs June 1st through June 25th and ticket information can be found Here.

Since 1966, every student to study at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts Graduate Acting program has studied circus techniques with Hovey Burgess. He also taught in the Drama Division of The Juilliard School (1968-1972). Hovey created, directed and performed with the Circo Dell’Arte (1969-1970), which included Cecil MacKinnon, Larry Pisoni, Judy Finelli, and Jim Jansen. He taught at Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Clown College (1973 – 1975, 1995), and at the Ultimate Clown School (since 1999) with Dick Monday and Tiffany Riley. His instructional
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Accidental Tourist

Is it a modern classic? I think so. Lawrence Kasdan’s best movie embraces characters often lampooned or dismissed, or stereotyped as kooks — introverts, extroverts, people trying to make personal connections and those trying to avoid them. William Hurt finds his best role and Geena Davis won an Oscar for hers; thirty years later the entire cast feel like beloved friends.

The Accidental Tourist

Blu-ray

The Warner Archive Collection

1988 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 121 min. / Street Date May 8, 2017 / Available from the The Warner Archive Collection Movies Store 29.95

Starring: William Hurt, Kathleen Turner, Geena Davis, Amy Wright, David Ogden Stiers, Ed Begley Jr., Bill Pullman.

Cinematography: John Bailey

Production Designer: Bo Welch

Film Editor: Carol Littleton

Original Music: John Williams

Written by Frank Galatiand Lawrence Kasdan

from the book by Anne Tyler

Produced by Phyllis Carlyle, Michael Grillo, Lawrence Kasdan, John Malkovich, Charles Okun

Directed by Lawrence Kasdan

Some of my favorite movies
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Nine Actors Who Reinvented Themselves and Revitalized Their Careers

  • Cinelinx
Some actors manage to catch lightning in a bottle twice. It’s impressive enough to find your niche in Hollywood’s A-list even once. Occasionally, an actor will reinvent him/herself and begin a new phase of their careers that will be even more successful than it was before. Here are nine actors who had a cinematic rebirth.

Liam Neeson- Neeson has had a long career, and the early part of it was in dramatic roles. An intense dramatic actor, he apeared in films like The Dead Pool, Dark Man, Schindler’s List, Rob Roy and Les Miserables. His career rebirth came after playing Qui-Gon Jinn in Star Wars-Episode one: The Phantom Menace. After that, he got more offers for actions parts and recreated himself as an action hero in films like Gangs of NY, Batman Begins, Taken, Clash of the Titans, the A-Team, Unknown, the Grey, Taken 2,
See full article at Cinelinx »

‘Pieces’ Blu-ray Review (Arrow Video)

Stars: Christopher George, Lynda Day George, Frank Brana, Edmund Purdom, Ian Sera, Paul L. Smith, Jack Taylor, Gerard Tichy, May Heatherly | Written by Dick Randall, Roberto Loyola | Directed by Juan Piquer Simón

Pieces is one of those movies that horror fans instantly fall in love with. While some would write it off as just another bad movie, others will love those moments of unintentional humour, especially from the dubbed version. This is what makes the Arrow Video Pieces: Limited Edition release on Blu-ray so much fun.

When a murderer stars killing off female students on a Boston college campus, the bodies soon start piling up. With body parts missing it seems that the killer is putting forming an interesting puzzle, but can they be stopped before they complete their work?

With a killer that is straight out of the Giallo genre, but a chainsaw that brings even more gore,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Animated Films and Shows That Deserve a Live-Action Reboot

Animated Films and Shows That Deserve a Live-Action Reboot
Turning cartoons into live-action movies: Rarely has a concept sounded so much better in theory than it usually works out in execution. The thought of what animation might look like recreated with sets and actors is enough to light up the mind’s eye — but the trouble is, it almost never ends up looking that way. Instead, it looks like “Inspector Gadget” or “Mr. Magoo,” or the “Alvin” and “Scooby-Doo” movies or that epiphany of live-cartoon awfulness, “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” It looks chintzy and broad and fake. On rare occasions, though, you see a picture like Robert Altman’s “Popeye” or the 2016 version of “Pete’s Dragon,” and it reminds you that turning a cartoon into a live-action feature can be an act of alchemy. With Disney’s live-action “Beauty and the Beast” hitting theaters this weekend, and with “Ghost in the Shell” (starring Scarlett Johansson) around the corner, we
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Animated Films and Shows That Deserve a Live-Action Reboot

Animated Films and Shows That Deserve a Live-Action Reboot
Turning cartoons into live-action movies: Rarely has a concept sounded so much better in theory than it usually works out in execution. The thought of what animation might look like recreated with sets and actors is enough to light up the mind’s eye — but the trouble is, it almost never ends up looking that way. Instead, it looks like “Inspector Gadget” or “Mr. Magoo,” or the “Alvin” and “Scooby-Doo” movies or that epiphany of live-cartoon awfulness, “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” It looks chintzy and broad and fake. On rare occasions, though, you see a picture like Robert Altman’s “Popeye” or the 2016 version of “Pete’s Dragon,” and it reminds you that turning a cartoon into a live-action feature can be an act of alchemy. With Disney’s live-action “Beauty and the Beast” hitting theaters this weekend, and with “Ghost in the Shell” (starring Scarlett Johansson) around the corner,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Exploring Disney's fascinating dark phase of the 70s and 80s

Ryan Lambie Dec 7, 2016

Space horror in The Black Hole. Animated death in The Black Cauldron. Ryan looks back at a unique period in Disney's filmmaking history...

When George Lucas started writing Star Wars in the early 70s, the space saga was intended to fill a void left behind by westerns, pirate movies and the sci-fi fantasy of old matinee serials. "Disney had abdicated its rein over the children's market," Lucas once said, according to Peter Biskind's book, Easy Riders, Raging Bulls, "and nothing had replaced it."

See related  Close To The Enemy episode 4 review Close To The Enemy episode 3 review Close To The Enemy episode 2 review Close To The Enemy episode 1 review

Indeed, Disney was one of many Hollywood studios that Lucas had approached with Star Wars and they, just like Universal, United Artists and everyone other than 20th Century Fox boss Alan Ladd Jr, had turned it down flat.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Scientology Looms as Kubrick Daughter Scraps Shelley Duvall Crowdfunding Campaign

Scientology Looms as Kubrick Daughter Scraps Shelley Duvall Crowdfunding Campaign
Jennifer Tilly gave $500, just one of 660 concerned fans who donated to a GoFundMe campaign that aimed to raise $100,000 for Shelley Duvall, the quirky, Minnie Mouse-voiced star of films like Stanley Kubrick's The Shining and Robert Altman's Nashville and Popeye. Now Tilly will be getting her donation back — and be left wondering, no doubt, exactly what happened.

The campaign was a direct response to a shocking and much-criticized Nov. 18 interview with Duvall by talk-show therapist Phil McGraw on his syndicated Dr. Phil. In it, the 67-year-old Duvall, practically unrecognizable from her doe-eyed younger self, demonstrated signs of severe psychosis...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Jon Brion: How I Made the Soundtrack for 'Punch-Drunk Love'

Jon Brion: How I Made the Soundtrack for 'Punch-Drunk Love'
It's blissfully romantic, undeniably eccentric, the easy go-to-answer for the best Adam Sandler movie ever made, a modernist gem, a valentine to old musicals and the only film to feature both Philip Seymour Hoffman and an abandoned harmonium in key supporting roles. Paul Thomas Anderson's Punch-Drunk Love remains an outlier in the filmmaker's career and one of the more oddball movies to come out of a studio in the past two decades – an ode to true love involving phone sex scams, pudding, wrecked public restrooms and proof that even
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Stanley Kubrick's Daughter Launches GoFundMe Campaign to Support 'Very Sick' Shelley Duvall

Stanley Kubrick's Daughter Launches GoFundMe Campaign to Support 'Very Sick' Shelley Duvall
After revealing to Dr. Phil on Friday that she's "very sick," Shelley Duvall is getting the help she asked for.

Watch: 'The Shining' Star Shelley Duvall Looks Unrecognizable, Reveals Mental Illness on 'Dr. Phil': 'I'm Very Sick' 

The 67-year-old actress is currently receiving support via a GoFundMe page launched by none other than the daughter of revered filmmaker Stanley Kubrick. Kubrick directed Duvall in her iconic role opposite Jack Nicholson in 1980's "The Shining." His daughter, Vivian, created the support page for Duvall the same day as the Dr. Phil tell-all, and as of Saturday, the campaign has raised $16,000 of its $100,000 goal.

"Like many older movie stars, embarrassed finances is not uncommon," the page reads. "Showing your love and support for Shelley Duvall by making a donation can start her back on the road to independence and perhaps back to health and for her fans, more superb performances!"

Watch: Actress
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Actress Shelley Duvall on Her Mental Illness: 'If I Say I'm Healthy, the First Thing They'll Do Is Hurt Me'

Actress Shelley Duvall on Her Mental Illness: 'If I Say I'm Healthy, the First Thing They'll Do Is Hurt Me'
After more than a decade away from the spotlight, Shelley Duvall gave an interview to Dr. Phil on Friday in which the actress reveals she's suffering from mental illness and claims that there are entities that intend to harm her.

"If I say I'm healthy, the first thing they'll do is hurt me tonight," Duvall says, unclear about who "they" are.

Watch: 'The Shining' Star Shelley Duvall Looks Unrecognizable, Reveals Mental Illness on 'Dr. Phil'

Best known for her role opposite Jack Nicholson in 1980's The Shining, Duvall, 67, last appeared on the big screen in the 2002 film, Manna From Heaven. Since then, Duvall admits to Dr. Phil that she's been alone "too much."

Dressed in sweatpants and a T-shirt, the two-time Emmy-nominated actress appears almost unrecognizable from the slender starlet many fans remember her as. While Dr. Phil points to her deteriorating health as a possible cause, Duvall claims
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

‘Dr. Phil’ Shelley Duvall Interview Prompts Criticism for ‘Exploitive Entertainment’

‘Dr. Phil’ Shelley Duvall Interview Prompts Criticism for ‘Exploitive Entertainment’
Friday’s episode of top-rated syndicated talk show “Dr. Phil” was devoted to an interview with Shelley Duvall, prompting a discussion about whether the show was exploiting the actress’ mental health problems.

Host Phil McGraw interviewed Duvall at length for the episode, dubbed “From Hollywood Star to Near Isolation.”

Duvall is best known for her starring roles in two movies from 1980: Stanley Kubrick’s classic “The Shining” and Robert Altman’s “Popeye,” Duvall has been out of the public eye for over a decade and lives in Texas where the interview took place.

A rep for “Dr. Phil” declined to comment on criticism of the show. The session was taped last month, a source said. Since then, the show has coordinated with Duvall’s family and has been providing free resources to help the actress at her home.

The conversation between McGraw and Duvall took up first 45 minutes of the show. The
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Shelley Duvall: From Her Shining Movie Moments to Her Life Away from the Spotlight

Shelley Duvall’s blood-curdling screams of terror in the climax of The Shining are an indelible part of film history, and the leading lady of the 1980 horror classic went on to work in everything from comedies to children’s television shows in the decades that followed.

The actress, now 67, has stepped away from the spotlight in recent years, but that hasn’t diminished the imprint she’s left — those curious wide eyes, that high-pitched voice, her signature slender frame — in films like Popeye and Annie Hall, and in her collaborations with auteur Robert Altman (Nashville, McCabe & Ms. Miller, 3 Women).

Duvall,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Dr. Phil Gets Shredded for ‘Exploitative’ Shelley Duvall Interview

  • The Wrap
Dr. Phil Gets Shredded for ‘Exploitative’ Shelley Duvall Interview
Shelley Duvall fans are not happy about Dr.Phil McGraw’s interview with the actress, accusing the TV host of “exploiting” the actress’ battle with mental illness. On Wednesday, a preview of the interview surfaced on the internet, featuring a nearly unrecognizable Duvall claiming that her “Popeye” co-star Robin Williams, who committed suicide in 2014, is still alive, and that she’s been threatened by “the Sheriff of Nottingham.” Reaction was swift and brutal on Twitter. Also Read: 'The Shining' Star Shelley Duvall Battles Mental Illness on 'Dr. Phil': 'I Need Help' (Video) “Very sad to hear
See full article at The Wrap »

Flashback: Shelley Duvall and Stanley Kubrick Battle Over 'The Shining'

Flashback: Shelley Duvall and Stanley Kubrick Battle Over 'The Shining'
A sad Dr. Phil interview with an unrecognizable Shelley Duvall hit the Internet last night that shows the actress clearly suffering from some sort of mental illness. Among other things, she says that Robin Williams is living as a shapeshifter, Robin Hood's Sheriff of Nottingham is somehow threatening her and there's a"whirling disc" implanted inside of her leg. "I'm very sick," she says. "I need help." Dr. Phil has been widely criticized for putting Duvall on television in this state, especially since she's been out of the public eye
See full article at Rolling Stone »
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