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Recommended New Books on Filmmaking: ‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’ Stephen King, ‘Caddyshack,’ and Summer Reading

Welcome to almost-summer! That means it’s time to think summer reading. Fans of cinema will find plenty of recent gems to read here, along with some bonus novels, a visual feast for Beatles junkies, and a Blu-ray release of one of David Lynch’s most fascinatingly divisive films. Let’s start with a new look at films based on the work of the horror maestro of Bangor, Maine.

Screening Stephen King: Adaptation and the Horror Genre in Film and Television by Simon Brown (University of Texas Press)

It is high time we had a serious examination of the many film adaptations of Stephen King’s novels. In Screening Stephen King, Simon Brown offers deep analysis of not just the obvious choices like Carrie but low-budget fare like Children of the Corn and The Mangler. Especially fascinating is his study of the several ABC-tv miniseries of the late 1980s and early 1990s.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Hollywood Flashback: Rodney Dangerfield Hit the Books in 1986's 'Back to School'

Hollywood Flashback: Rodney Dangerfield Hit the Books in 1986's 'Back to School'
SyntaxError: Json Parse error: Unexpected identifier "The" The scholastic comedy vein that Melissa McCarthy mines in Warner Bros.' May 11release Life of the Party — empty nest parent goes to college, shows undergrads how to drunkenly frolic the old-school way — was first tapped by Rodney Dangerfield, then 64, in 1986's Back to School.

The bug-eyed stand-up, famous for his "I don't get no respect" catchphrase, had made his first major film appearance in 1980's Caddyshack, where he shared the screen with a dancing gopher. In...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

5 Crazy Stories You Didn’t Know About the Making of ‘Caddyshack’

5 Crazy Stories You Didn’t Know About the Making of ‘Caddyshack’
Just like Carl Spackler and his imagined victory at the Masters, “Caddyshack” was the surprise cult comedy no one saw coming.

The year was 1980. Chevy Chase and Bill Murray were at the peak of their fame in their halcyon “Saturday Night Live” days; Rodney Dangerfield and Ted Knight were having career resurgences; and “Animal House” was a massive blockbuster that ushered in a new generation of slobs vs. snobs comedy into the mainstream.

And yet the cast, producer Doug Kenney and director Harold Ramis were prepared for “Caddyshack” to tank. Ramis was a first-time director trying to wrangle a fiasco of a production. Early preview screenings made them think they had floated a Baby Ruth in the pool rather than landed on the next “Animal House.” And the response from critics and the box office was tepid at best.

Entertainment Weekly film critic Chris Nashawaty’s new book, “Caddyshack: The Making of a Hollywood Cinderella Story,” charts the journey the film took to cult acclaim, from Kenney’s time at National Lampoon to the cast’s rise to stardom at Second City and “SNL.” There are a lot of surprise revelations about the making of “Caddyshack,” from cocaine-addled benders on set to some last minute scrambling to get Murray’s character in the film at all.

Also Read: 'Groundhog Day' at 25: How Bill Murray Rom-Com Became an Accidental Classic

The original draft of the script was 200 pages long – and Carl Spackler wasn’t in it

The original script of “Caddyshack” written by Ramis, Kenney and Brian Doyle-Murray clocked in at 200 pages and was far different from the movie it would become. “It looked like the Bible,” an executive on the film, Mark Canton, says in the book.

The script went through so many last minute changes on set that the actors lost track of them. Entire monologues and memorable lines of dialogue from Chase, Dangerfield, Murray and more were completely improvised, as was much of the film.

Not once in the 200 pages did the name Carl Spackler appear, Nashawaty writes. Murray was a late addition to the cast, and when he finally did have a character, he appeared in only a handful of scenes. His “Dalai Lama” story was given to another actor who struggled with it, his scene with Chase’s character Ty Webb was tacked on after Murray had already wrapped and returned to “SNL,” and his “Cinderella Story” monologue was entirely an invention of Murray. There was nothing written in the script for the scene, so Ramis gave Murray the direction, “Did you ever do imaginary golf commentary in your head?” The rest is, well, a miracle.

Also Read: Bill Murray to Open 'Caddyshack'-Themed Bar Near Chicago

Mickey Rourke was strongly considered to play Danny Noonan

The role of Danny Noonan went down to two finalists — Mickey Rourke and Michael O’Keefe, who ultimately booked it. “This was the early, young, hot, relaxed Mickey Rourke,” O’Keefe says in the book. “He was as compelling as Marlon Brando in a way back then…But I’m a little more easy on the eyes than Mickey. Clearly it would have been a much darker movie.”

Ramis described Rourke as “maybe too real for the movie,” saying, “Michael O’Keefe seemed like a really good boy. Plus, he was a scratch golfer. Mickey Rourke was much more complicated.”

Nearly everyone was doing cocaine – A Lot of it

Michael O’Keefe says in Nashawaty’s book that “cocaine was everywhere” on the set. He described his 11 weeks there as “a permanent party.” Instead of responsible producers making sure everyone played by the rules, Kenney led the charge of much of the cast and crew’s rampant drug use. “The eagle has landed; the eagle has landed! Get your per diems in cash, the dealer’s here,” he would yell, running through their motel hallways. Chase described that cocaine would just “materialize” on set, much to the annoyance of Knight, who always got to bed early, showed up for call time early and didn’t appreciate the looser, more improvisational approach to filming.

Also Read: 'Ghostbusters' Origin Story: How John Belushi and Cocaine Helped Inspire Slimer

Shooting at the same time and released the same summer was “The Blues Brothers,” which was also when John Belushi started getting heavily addicted to cocaine. According to Nashawaty, when that film’s budget started rising as a result of Belushi’s binges, the studio was forced to crack down on the parties on the “Caddyshack” set.

Bill Murray was a “magnificent flake”

Murray has countless urban legends to his name, but his legendary status started even before his “Caddyshack” days. He was shooting the Hunter S. Thompson movie “Where the Buffalo Roam” in the summer of ’79, and was due back in New York for “SNL” in the fall, so Ramis had him for just six days. But Murray never made it clear just when he’d show up on set. As far as Ramis knew, Murray was Mia.

Turns out Murray had commandeered Lorne Michaels’ Vw bug and had driven it everywhere from Los Angeles to Florida to Aspen and took it upon himself to install a stereo along the way. When he finally arrived, he rolled up in a golf cart and said, “Which way to the youth hostel?” The following morning, Murray and actress Cindy Morgan (who played Lacey Underall in the film) woke up together on a nude beach in Jupiter, Florida, after the two had just met.

The gopher saved the day

As Nashawaty writes, it became clear fairly quickly that Ramis was out of his depth in editing “Caddyshack.” He had come from an improv background and used a “yes and…” mentality during filming, but he struggled to find a connective thread for the countless scenes of his actors just riffing and being goofy. The first cut of “Caddyshack” clocked in at four and a half hours. And it was a mess.

They had several editors look at the footage and attempt to salvage it, but it was executive producer Jon Peters who suggested that the gopher, only seen sparingly at first, could be the thing that tied everything together. They were then forced to ask the studio for an extra half-million dollars to build an animatronic gopher and, in the process, cut out the romantic subplots of many of the younger actors. When Kenny Loggins saw that gopher dance, the theme song he wrote should’ve been a clue that everything with “Caddyshack” would be just fine: “I’m Alright. Nobody worry about me.”

Read original story 5 Crazy Stories You Didn’t Know About the Making of ‘Caddyshack’ At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Second Opinion – Super Troopers 2 (2018)

Super Troopers 2, 2018.

Directed by Jay Chandrasekhar.

Starring Erik Stolhanske, Jay Chandrasekhar, Steve Lemme, Paul Sotor, Kevin Heffernan, Brian Cox, Marisa Coughlan, Bruce McCulloch, Lynda Carter, Rob Lowe, Hayes MacArthur, Tyler Labine, and Will Sasso.

Synopsis:

When a border dispute arises between the U.S. and Canada, the Super Troopers are tasked with establishing a Highway Patrol station in the disputed area.

We catch up with the titular Vermont Highway patrol officers as Governor Jessman (erstwhile Wonder Woman Lynda Carter) offers them a shot at redemption for past slip-ups. Their mission: to take over policing duties in a small French-Canadian town recently remanded to the U.S. thanks to a snafu involving border markers. (Canada seems to have become regular comedic fodder because its relation to the U.S. feels tranquil enough for some semi-good-natured mockery.) Soon, the Troopers butt heads with the Canadian Mounties while attempting to unravel the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

What’s Leaving Netflix in April 2018

Heroes and criminals alike will depart Netflix in April. Some of the first titles on the streaming service’s chopping block for the month include four Batman films and Frank Darabont’s Oscar-nominated jailhouse drama “The Shawshank Redemption,” featuring Morgan Freeman and Tim Robbins.

The streaming giant will also let go of TV series like “Dukes of Hazzard” and “Happy Tree Friends,” with more movie tentpoles like “Kung Fu Panda 3” rounding out the month’s departures.

View the full list of titles leaving Netflix below.

April 1

30 Days of Night

88 Minutes

Ace Ventura: Pet Detective

Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Netflix schedule: Here’s what is coming and leaving in April 2018

Netflix has confirmed that a slew of new original series will be debuting on the streaming service in April. There will also be new to Netflix seasons of some of your favorites from other networks. Likewise, there will be plenty of movies making their first Netflix appearances including the animated classic “The Iron Giant” and several films in the “Pirates of the Caribbean” and “Despicable Me” series.

Of the new Netflix originals, several stand out as particularly binge-worthy, including the freshman seasons of the remake of “Lost in Space” and the TV version of the Oscar-nominated animated film “The Boss Baby.” And there are episodes of both the new David Letterman and Joel McHale talk shows as well as a comedy special from Kevin James.

Available April 1

A Sort of Family

Along Came Polly

Bad Boys

Battlefield Earth

Beethoven’s Christmas Adventure

Big Time

Body of Lies

Cabin Fever

Cabin Fever 2: Spring Fever
See full article at Gold Derby »

Joel McHale and Emmy Rossum on ‘A Futile and Stupid Gesture’ and Early Memories of National Lampoon

Now streaming on Netflix is director David Wain’s great new movie, A Futile and Stupid Gesture. The film chronicles the life and career of National Lampoon co-founder Doug Kenney (played by Will Forte) and doesn’t gloss over his troubled life. If you don’t know Doug’s name, he co-founded National Lampoon with fellow Harvard students Henry Beard and Robert Hoffman and helped grow it from a local college paper to a hugely successful nationwide brand. He also worked as a writer in Hollywood on films like National Lampoon’s Animal House and Caddyshack. The film …
See full article at Collider.com »

Netflix: Movies and TV Shows Leaving in April

Netflix is wasting no time in letting go of movies this month. On April 1 alone, Apollo 13, The Shawshank Redemption, The Whole Nine Yards, Cool Runnings, The Pursuit of Happyness and Wild Wild West leave.

Also leaving the streaming service at the beginning of the month are four Batman films: the 1966 Batman starring Adam West, Batman Returns, Batman Forever and Batman & Robin. Comedies American Pie, Ace Ventura and Caddyshack are also disappearing on Sunday.

As a number of titles are leaving, a variety of films and TV shows are being added to Netflix's library throughout the month....
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Netflix: Movies and TV Shows Leaving in April

Netflix is wasting no time in letting go of movies this month. On April 1 alone, Apollo 13, The Shawshank Redemption, The Whole Nine Yards, Cool Runnings, The Pursuit of Happyness and Wild Wild West leave.

Also leaving the streaming service at the beginning of the month are four Batman films: the 1966 Batman starring Adam West, Batman Returns, Batman Forever and Batman & Robin. Comedies American Pie, Ace Ventura and Caddyshack are also disappearing on Sunday.

As a number of titles are leaving, a variety of films and TV shows are being added to Netflix's library throughout the month....
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Here’s What Leaving Netflix in April 2018

Netflix has announced the titles it will be adding in April 2018, which means we also have to say good-bye to a handful of titles next month as well. The service is losing some noteworthy titles including Apollo 13, Batman, Batman Returns, Caddyshack, Cool Runnings, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, Eagle vs. Shark, John Mulaney: New in Town, Never Let Me Go, Small Soldiers, The Shawshank Redemption, The Prestige, and Exit Through the Gift Shop. If you had these movies on your list for a while, perhaps bump them up to the top so you can check them out before …
See full article at Collider.com »

Ace Ventura, American Pie, Batman and Wild Wild West Leaving Netflix in April 2018

Say goodbye to Ace Ventura, American Pie, Batman and more of your favorite film franchises. Netflix announced today which film and TV titles will no longer be available to stream in the month of April. Luckily, subscribers have a few more days to watch movies like Begin Again, Caddyshack, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Leap Year, The Whole Nine Yards and Wild Wild West before a new slate—featuring Along Came Polly, Scarface and Sin City—takes their places. Here's the full list of what's expiring on Netflix in April 2018: Leaving 4/1/18 30 Days of Night 88 Minutes Ace Ventura: Pet Detective Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls American Pie...
See full article at E! Online »

Harold Ramis' Daughter Shares Touching Message on Anniversary of Actor's Death

Harold Ramis' Daughter Shares Touching Message on Anniversary of Actor's Death
The daughter of Harold Ramis shared a sweet message on Saturday, which marked the anniversary of the actor's passing.

Along with a photo of Ramis as Egon Spengler from the Ghostbusters franchise, Violet Ramis Stiel wrote, "Death is but a door..."

This is a line from Ghostbusters II that is attributed to the villain, Vigo the Carpathian.

The full line is: "Death is but a door. Time is but a window. I'll be back."

The beloved actor and director died in 2014.

As a director, Ramis' films included Caddyshack, National Lampoon's Vacation, Groundhog Day and Analyze This.

As an actor, he appeared in such classics as Stripes, both...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Chevy Chase Says He Was Attacked in Road Rage Incident

  • TMZ
Chevy Chase Says He Was Attacked in Road Rage Incident
Chevy Chase tracked down a truck he says cut him off, but when he tried to confront the driver he ended up getting booted to the ground ... according to a police report. Chevy claims he was traveling over NY's Tappan Zee Bridge on February 9 when a black pickup cut him off. He told cops he though the truck hit his car, so he flashed his high beams and followed it until the driver pulled over.
See full article at TMZ »

25 Years of Groundhog Day! 12 Facts You Probably Didn’t Predict

  • Cineplex
25 Years of Groundhog Day! 12 Facts You Probably Didn’t Predict25 Years of Groundhog Day! 12 Facts You Probably Didn’t PredictKurt Anthony2/12/2018 1:20:00 Pm

Okay, campers. Rise and shine! It’s the 25th anniversary of Groundhog Day!

Directed by Harold Ramis (Caddyshack), the infinitely quotable cult classic stars Bill Murray (Ghostbusters) as a TV weatherman who’s having the day of his life…over, and over again. Featuring Andie MacDowell (Sex, Lies, and Videotape), Chris Elliott (The Abyss), and a hilariously repetitive script, this is one time warp comedy that never gets old!

Filmed on a budget of $14.6M, Groundhog Day was released in theatres on February 12, 1993 and went on to earn over $70M at the domestic box office. In fact, the film was so successful it was added to the United States National Film Registry in 2006!

Join us on an enlightening journey as we list 12 facts you probably didn’t predict about Groundhog Day.
See full article at Cineplex »

‘Groundhog Day’ at 25: How a Minor Holiday Gave Birth to an All-Time Comedy Classic

‘Groundhog Day’ at 25: How a Minor Holiday Gave Birth to an All-Time Comedy Classic
Some films have become so much a part of the culture that they almost seem like they’re playing on a continuous loop in our minds. Kind of like the loop Bill Murray finds himself stuck repeating in “Groundhog Day.” One of the most-beloved comedies of all time, the 1993 film celebrates its 25th anniversary on Feb. 12.

Just ask co-star Stephen Tobolowsky, who still can’t go anywhere without being recognized for his role as the annoyingly friendly insurance salesman Ned Ryerson.

Even at the ticket kiosk at ancient Roman ruins in the south of France where he was visiting with his wife. “Though the man selling the tickets couldn’t speak English, he knew the word ‘Ned.’”

“‘Groundhog Day’ always and forever is what I am linked to, which is a good thing to be linked to,” said Tobolowsky. “I mean, it’s quite a movie.”

Added to the National Film Registry for being deemed “culturally, historically
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A Futile and Stupid Gesture: Did That Ending Really Happen?

  • BuzzSugar
The new Netflix biopic A Futile and Stupid Gesture depicts the triumphs and personal struggles of comedy writer Doug Kenney, the founder of the renowned National Lampoon humor magazine. Comedy fans are likely to be familiar with writer's tragic fate - at the age of 33, Kenney fell off a cliff while vacationing in Hawaii. The movie cuts from a scene of Kenney sitting on a cliff to one of his friend Henry Beard receiving a phone call about his death, making no speculation about how the comedian dies. However, it drops a wild, twist ending that no one saw coming, taking creative liberties in depicting what actually happened at Kenney's funeral. We're talking about that crazy food fight at the funeral. In a surrealist setup, we see Kenney and an older version of himself watching friends and family pay their respects. Bill Murray notes, "Every funny person in the world is here.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

The Real Story Behind Netflix's Surprisingly Crushing Comedy Biopic

  • BuzzSugar
Younger generations may not have heard of the humor magazine National Lampoon, but they are likely familiar with the works of its founder Doug Kenney, the genius behind comedy movies like Animal House and Caddyshack. Although the magazine only ran from 1970 to 1998, its impact still remains strong today. The magazine touted some of the brightest comedic minds of its time, some of whom would eventually become early cast members of Saturday Night Live. With a star-studded cast of contemporary comedians, the new Netflix movie A Futile and Stupid Gesture pays homage to Kenney's turbulent and difficult life while he ran the humor magazine. National Lampoon's legacy continues to influence comedians today, even though Kenney passed away at the age of 33 in 1980. The Harvard Lampoon National Lampoon started as a spinoff of The Harvard Lampoon, an undergraduate humor magazine that began at Harvard University in 1876. During his time at Harvard, Kenney
See full article at BuzzSugar »

4 Facts About National Lampoon Cofounder Doug Kenney

A Futile and Stupid Gesture, an inside look at the life of Doug Kenney, made its debut on Netflix on Jan. 26. Doug, played by comedian Will Forte, was the cofounder of National Lampoon magazine and was responsible for changing the trajectory of humor on the big screen. He was hailed as a comedic genius, carving out a permanent place for dark comedy and satire in the 1970s and 1980s in a way that still resonates today. As shown in the film, Kenney blazed the path for his contemporaries, many of whom eventually ended up on Saturday Night Live. While you may not have been familiar with Kenney by name, you've definitely benefited from his legacy. 1. Doug cofounded National Lampoon in 1970. While in college, he served as the editor of The Harvard Lampoon. Along with friends Henry Beard and Rob Hoffman, he was already writing parodies of other magazines and stories,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Recreating Animal House in the Netflix movie A Futile and Stupid Gesture

The Netflix original movie A Futile and Stupid Gesture tells the true story of National Lampoon co-founder Doug Kenney (Will Forte). It goes as far as the National Lampoon production of Animal House and Kenney’s Caddyshack before he died. Knowing that part of Kenney’s story would include Animal House, director David Wain didn’t want to just do the Animal House scenes everyone was expecting. “The goal was to pick moments that are very memorable from Animal House but see them from a different perspective and from a different context,” Wain said. There is a food fight in the movie, because...read more
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Kenny Loggins to Be Honored at Guild of Music Supervisors Awards (Exclusive)

Kenny Loggins to Be Honored at Guild of Music Supervisors Awards (Exclusive)
Kenny Loggins will receive the Icon Award at the Guild of Music Supervisors Awards on Feb. 8 at Los Angeles’ Theater at Ace Hotel. It is the first time the Guild is bestowing the honor, which recognizes outstanding achievements in film, television, and soundtracks.

Loggins, whose songs have been featured in such hit films as “Caddyshack” (“I’m Alright”), “Top Gun” (“Danger Zone”) and “Footloose,” will also perform a medley of at the ceremony.

Said Thomas Golubić, president of the Guild of Music Supervisors: “’Caddyshack,’ ‘Footloose,’ ‘Top Gun.’ It was the Kenny Loggins songs that sealed the deal on those movies becoming part of our collective experience of the 1980s. You remember the first time you saw those films and how you felt when the credits rolled. We are so thrilled to have Kenny Loggins accept our inaugural year in celebrating the great Icons of music in media.”

The Guild of Music Supervisors Awards, currently in its
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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