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Matt “Guitar” Murphy Dies: Blues Brothers Guitarist And Noted Sideman Was 88

Matt “Guitar” Murphy Dies: Blues Brothers Guitarist And Noted Sideman Was 88
Matt “Guitar” Murphy, best known as one of the stalwarts of the Blues Brothers Band and a renowned sideman with Howlin’ Wolf, Memphis Slim, Muddy Waters, James Cotton and many others, has died. He was 88 and his death was confirmed by his nephew, Floyd Murphy Jr., on Facebook. Murphy gained his biggest audience as a member of the band in the Blues Brothers movies, appearing as the beleagured husband of cafe owner Aretha Franklin, insisting that he was “the man” when…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Elton John Biopic Rocketman Is All Sex, Drugs and Rock N Roll

Elton John Biopic Rocketman Is All Sex, Drugs and Rock N Roll
Matthew Vaughn, who is co-producing the upcoming Elton John biopic Rocketman alongside Paramount Pictures, has described the movie as "the first R-rated musical," including "drugs, sex, [and] rock'n'roll." Matthew Vaughn's production company Marv Studios will have a big hand in the upcoming biopic, and given a number of their previous movies such as Kingsman, it's understandable that this movie will be raunchy.

Vaughn's description of Rocketman being the "first R-rated musical" isn't entirely true, unfortunately. There have already been a number of R-rated musicals over the years, including serious ones like Sweeney Todd and Purple Rain, along with comedies like Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny and The Blues Brothers. Regardless, Vaughn's message comes across clear that Rocketman will be like no other musical we've seen before. While it won't technically be the first R-rated musical, it will most likely be the first of its kind.

Rocketman is set to star Taron Egerton,
See full article at MovieWeb »

5 Crazy Stories You Didn’t Know About the Making of ‘Caddyshack’

5 Crazy Stories You Didn’t Know About the Making of ‘Caddyshack’
Just like Carl Spackler and his imagined victory at the Masters, “Caddyshack” was the surprise cult comedy no one saw coming.

The year was 1980. Chevy Chase and Bill Murray were at the peak of their fame in their halcyon “Saturday Night Live” days; Rodney Dangerfield and Ted Knight were having career resurgences; and “Animal House” was a massive blockbuster that ushered in a new generation of slobs vs. snobs comedy into the mainstream.

And yet the cast, producer Doug Kenney and director Harold Ramis were prepared for “Caddyshack” to tank. Ramis was a first-time director trying to wrangle a fiasco of a production. Early preview screenings made them think they had floated a Baby Ruth in the pool rather than landed on the next “Animal House.” And the response from critics and the box office was tepid at best.

Entertainment Weekly film critic Chris Nashawaty’s new book, “Caddyshack: The Making of a Hollywood Cinderella Story,” charts the journey the film took to cult acclaim, from Kenney’s time at National Lampoon to the cast’s rise to stardom at Second City and “SNL.” There are a lot of surprise revelations about the making of “Caddyshack,” from cocaine-addled benders on set to some last minute scrambling to get Murray’s character in the film at all.

Also Read: 'Groundhog Day' at 25: How Bill Murray Rom-Com Became an Accidental Classic

The original draft of the script was 200 pages long – and Carl Spackler wasn’t in it

The original script of “Caddyshack” written by Ramis, Kenney and Brian Doyle-Murray clocked in at 200 pages and was far different from the movie it would become. “It looked like the Bible,” an executive on the film, Mark Canton, says in the book.

The script went through so many last minute changes on set that the actors lost track of them. Entire monologues and memorable lines of dialogue from Chase, Dangerfield, Murray and more were completely improvised, as was much of the film.

Not once in the 200 pages did the name Carl Spackler appear, Nashawaty writes. Murray was a late addition to the cast, and when he finally did have a character, he appeared in only a handful of scenes. His “Dalai Lama” story was given to another actor who struggled with it, his scene with Chase’s character Ty Webb was tacked on after Murray had already wrapped and returned to “SNL,” and his “Cinderella Story” monologue was entirely an invention of Murray. There was nothing written in the script for the scene, so Ramis gave Murray the direction, “Did you ever do imaginary golf commentary in your head?” The rest is, well, a miracle.

Also Read: Bill Murray to Open 'Caddyshack'-Themed Bar Near Chicago

Mickey Rourke was strongly considered to play Danny Noonan

The role of Danny Noonan went down to two finalists — Mickey Rourke and Michael O’Keefe, who ultimately booked it. “This was the early, young, hot, relaxed Mickey Rourke,” O’Keefe says in the book. “He was as compelling as Marlon Brando in a way back then…But I’m a little more easy on the eyes than Mickey. Clearly it would have been a much darker movie.”

Ramis described Rourke as “maybe too real for the movie,” saying, “Michael O’Keefe seemed like a really good boy. Plus, he was a scratch golfer. Mickey Rourke was much more complicated.”

Nearly everyone was doing cocaine – A Lot of it

Michael O’Keefe says in Nashawaty’s book that “cocaine was everywhere” on the set. He described his 11 weeks there as “a permanent party.” Instead of responsible producers making sure everyone played by the rules, Kenney led the charge of much of the cast and crew’s rampant drug use. “The eagle has landed; the eagle has landed! Get your per diems in cash, the dealer’s here,” he would yell, running through their motel hallways. Chase described that cocaine would just “materialize” on set, much to the annoyance of Knight, who always got to bed early, showed up for call time early and didn’t appreciate the looser, more improvisational approach to filming.

Also Read: 'Ghostbusters' Origin Story: How John Belushi and Cocaine Helped Inspire Slimer

Shooting at the same time and released the same summer was “The Blues Brothers,” which was also when John Belushi started getting heavily addicted to cocaine. According to Nashawaty, when that film’s budget started rising as a result of Belushi’s binges, the studio was forced to crack down on the parties on the “Caddyshack” set.

Bill Murray was a “magnificent flake”

Murray has countless urban legends to his name, but his legendary status started even before his “Caddyshack” days. He was shooting the Hunter S. Thompson movie “Where the Buffalo Roam” in the summer of ’79, and was due back in New York for “SNL” in the fall, so Ramis had him for just six days. But Murray never made it clear just when he’d show up on set. As far as Ramis knew, Murray was Mia.

Turns out Murray had commandeered Lorne Michaels’ Vw bug and had driven it everywhere from Los Angeles to Florida to Aspen and took it upon himself to install a stereo along the way. When he finally arrived, he rolled up in a golf cart and said, “Which way to the youth hostel?” The following morning, Murray and actress Cindy Morgan (who played Lacey Underall in the film) woke up together on a nude beach in Jupiter, Florida, after the two had just met.

The gopher saved the day

As Nashawaty writes, it became clear fairly quickly that Ramis was out of his depth in editing “Caddyshack.” He had come from an improv background and used a “yes and…” mentality during filming, but he struggled to find a connective thread for the countless scenes of his actors just riffing and being goofy. The first cut of “Caddyshack” clocked in at four and a half hours. And it was a mess.

They had several editors look at the footage and attempt to salvage it, but it was executive producer Jon Peters who suggested that the gopher, only seen sparingly at first, could be the thing that tied everything together. They were then forced to ask the studio for an extra half-million dollars to build an animatronic gopher and, in the process, cut out the romantic subplots of many of the younger actors. When Kenny Loggins saw that gopher dance, the theme song he wrote should’ve been a clue that everything with “Caddyshack” would be just fine: “I’m Alright. Nobody worry about me.”

Read original story 5 Crazy Stories You Didn’t Know About the Making of ‘Caddyshack’ At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

“The Banana Killer” to Strike on Blu-ray with New 4K Restoration of John Landis’ Schlock

Before Animal House, The Blues Brothers, and An American Werewolf in London, John Landis paid homage to classic genre films with Schlock. Set in a small town tormented by a creature known as "The Banana Killer," Landis' first feature film is coming out on Blu-ray with a limited edition 4K restoration this April from Turbine Media Group:

Press Release: New York, NY – March 15, 2018 – Turbine Media Group in association with director John Landis present John Landis' long out-of-print first feature film, the cult comedy Schlock, in its Blu-ray world premiere in an exclusive dual-format mediabook Blu-ray/DVD worldwide-playable combo set limited to 2000 copies, releasing April 27th, 2018.

A love stronger, and stranger, than King Kong and Fay Wray! The long-slumbering banana monster Schlock wakes up after 20 million years and escapes from his cave, befriending a blind girl who thinks he's a dog, and causes mass panic in the small town with a
See full article at DailyDead »

Paul Shaffer Reveals How He Landed the 'Late Show With David Letterman' and 'SNL' (Exclusive)

In an exclusive interview with Closer Weekly, Paul Shaffer reminisces on how he landed his Late Show with David Letterman and Saturday Night Live gigs. The 68-year-old admits his goal was to be a musician. "The first real jobs I got out of college were playing weddings, bar mitzvahs, topless clubs — anything available! Then on a fluke, I was hired to conduct Godspell [in Toronto in 1972] with some of the funniest people I've ever worked with. Many remain my good friends today, including Martin Short, Andrea Martin, Eugene Levy, Dave Thomas, and Victor Garber." And that's how he ended up in comedy. "We hung out incessantly and tried to make each other laugh nonstop. I was influenced profoundly by them — they seemed like they were having a better time than anybody I knew. They looked at everything through a comedic prism, and I started doing the same." Paul tells Closer. He landed SNL when Howard Shore,
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Sam Moore Honored At 2018 Dream Ball Gala

The Legendary Soul Man Sam Moore was honored with the Trailblazer Award at the annual Dream Ball Gala on Monday, February 19 at the Bomb Factory in the Deep Ellum area of Dallas.

The Legendary Soul Man Sam Moore Performs At 2018 Dream Ball

The gala is produced by Nancy Lieberman Charities, a 501c3 organization that promotes healthy lifestyles and educational opportunities for young girls and boys, and is dedicated to expanding and ensuring that educational and sports opportunities exist for economically disadvantaged youth. Moore was presented with the Trailblazer Award by former Dallas Police Chief David Brown, and also performed a short set during the program, garnering rave reviews. Fellow honoree Billy Crystal was joined by Bo Derek, Tony Dorsett, Deion Sanders, Jose’ Guzman, and Spud Webb, among other celebrities and local dignitaries, who were also in attendance. The Dream Ball Gala is one of several annual charity events organized by Nancy Lieberman Charities.
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Oscars flashback: Denzel Washington beams in front of his mother winning Best Supporting Actor for ‘Glory’ [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Denzel Washington beams in front of his mother winning Best Supporting Actor for ‘Glory’ [Watch]
In the late 1980s after six successful years on “St. Elsewhere,” Denzel Washington was making a successful segue into the movies. Just as that show was about to end for NBC, he received his first Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor as a South African activist in the 1987 film “Cry Freedom.” He lost the award that evening to Sean Connery (“The Untouchables”), but it would be just two years later that he would take home the gold for his performance as Private Silas Tripp in “Glory.”

See Oscar Best Supporting Actor Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

Watch his acceptance speech above from the 1990 Academy Awards ceremony as the 36-year-old actor beams in front of his mother and wife after presenter Geena Davis announces his name. He also thanks the men of the 54th from the American Civil War. In the film, Washington played an emancipated former slave
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Contenders Christopher Nolan, Gary Oldman, and Saoirse Ronan Take on the Awards Circuit in Santa Barbara — Watch

Oscar Contenders Christopher Nolan, Gary Oldman, and Saoirse Ronan Take on the Awards Circuit in Santa Barbara — Watch
This past week saw a rogue’s gallery of Oscar contenders trek up the coast from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara, which is still recovering from the double-whammy of three weeks of fires followed by cataclysmic mud slides. Jeff Bridges’ Montecito home was among the houses buried in mud; his SUV was found seven houses away, but his office and archives (complete with his “The Big Lebowski” sweater) were spared. Among the movies world premiering at the city’s annual International Film Festival Festival under the direction of Roger Durling was Bridges’ environmental documentary “Living in the Future’s Past,” and as always the local community welcomed a stream of Hollywood visitors for a series of illuminating tributes and panels.

Check the videos below.

My “It Starts with the Script” panel featured director Edgar Wright, who attached a music file to his music-driven screenplay for “Baby Driver,” Chicago-born Virgil Williams
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Oscar Contenders Christopher Nolan, Gary Oldman, and Saoirse Ronan Take on the Awards Circuit in Santa Barbara — Watch

  • Indiewire
Oscar Contenders Christopher Nolan, Gary Oldman, and Saoirse Ronan Take on the Awards Circuit in Santa Barbara — Watch
This past week saw a rogue’s gallery of Oscar contenders trek up the coast from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara, which is still recovering from the double-whammy of three weeks of fires followed by cataclysmic mud slides. Jeff Bridges’ Montecito home was among the houses buried in mud; his SUV was found seven houses away, but his office and archives (complete with his “The Big Lebowski” sweater) were spared. Among the movies world premiering at the city’s annual International Film Festival Festival under the direction of Roger Durling was Bridges’ environmental documentary “Living in the Future’s Past,” and as always the local community welcomed a stream of Hollywood visitors for a series of illuminating tributes and panels.

Check the videos below.

My “It Starts with the Script” panel featured director Edgar Wright, who attached a music file to his music-driven screenplay for “Baby Driver,” Chicago-born Virgil Williams
See full article at Indiewire »

Jennifer Hudson to Play Aretha Franklin in Queen of Soul Biopic

Legendary singer Aretha Franklin has chosen singer and Oscar-winning actress Jennifer Hudson to play her in an upcoming biopic about the Queen of Soul. Franklin is unquestionably one of the greatest singers in history, the voice behind such classic 1960s R&B hits as “Respect,” “Chain of Fools,” “Think” and “(You Make Me Feel) A Natural Woman.” The tunes are so iconic that they, along with many others, have turned up in more than a couple hundred films and television shows over the years, including The Big Chill, The Blues Brothers (which she also appeared in), Sex and the City and more recently, Scandal.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Mark Hamill Remembers Carrie Fisher on One Year Anniversary of Her Death

Mark Hamill Remembers Carrie Fisher on One Year Anniversary of Her Death
It may be hard to believe that it's been one year since the death of Carrie Fisher. And the full blow of her untimely passing has been softened somewhat by her omnipresent force in this December's The Last Jedi. Now co-star Mark Hamill, who plays Carrie Fisher's on-screen twin brother in the iconic space opera, is remembering his friend with a line of memorable dialogue from the latest Skywalker saga sequel. He simply says this in her memory.

"No one's ever really gone."

Mark Hamill posted a few images on Instagram in remembering Carrie Fisher and her role as Princess Leia, which spawned five movies in total. Carrie Fisher passed away exactly one year ago today. The above line is delivered by Luke upon reuniting with General Leia Organa on the salt planet Crait, as they say their final good-bye.

Mark Hamill and Carrie Fisher were shot into the stratosphere
See full article at MovieWeb »

Hugh Jackman Jokes About The Possibility Of A Wolverine Musical

We all know that Hugh Jackman is brilliant as Wolverine, the role he’s shepherded for the past 17 years and finally vacated earlier this year in Logan. But we also know that he’s a great singer and dancer, too, as proven in the likes of Les Miserables and his new movie, The Greatest Showman. It stands to reason, then, that a Wolverine musical could be the best thing you’ve ever seen.

In fact, this suggestion was jokingly put to the star in a recent interview with Yahoo. At first, the actor laughed the idea off, explaining that Logan is not the kind of guy who would start singing and dancing in the middle of one of his movies. When asked if he would be up for the project though, he said:

“No, and nor would Wolverine, I can tell you right now. I think I’ve played him long enough…
See full article at We Got This Covered »

NYC Weekend Watch: Ozu, Peter Nestler, ‘Monterey Pop,’ Bertrand Tavernier & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

The best of Ozu in one series.

Films by members of Magnum Photos will screen, as does Alan Clarke’s Rita, Sue and Bob Too.

Museum of the Moving Image

The Spielberg series screens three underseen, rediscovery-ready titles this weekend.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

Largely unseen, the films of Peter Nestler, a key figure in post-war German cinema, are being given their due in a new series.

Nitehawk Cinema

Midnight brings the restored Monterey Pop, Street Trash, and The Holy Mountain.

The Blues Brothers (with pre-show performance) and The Lost World screen before noon.

Quad Cinema

The films made and loved by Bertrand Tavernier are screening.

Funeral Parade of Roses continues its run.

Museum of Modern Art

The Philippine series continues running, including two films by Lav Diaz.

IFC Center

Midnight brings To Live and Die in L.A., The Thing, The Italian Job, and Taxi Driver.

During the day, Stalker, No Country for Old Men, and Monterey Pop are offered.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Fulfill Your Naked Bike Riding Dreams + More London Events This Week 6/5-6/11

Maybe you’ve had one of those weeks: The tube was late, the audition sucked, then it rained over and over again. Well, let London apologise for its rudeness by finally revealing its fun side with our rundown of what to do in the next week… Saddle up!This is one’s only for the brave! June 10 is World Naked Bike Ride Day when thousands of cyclists ride through central London totally utterly nude. What started as an anti-car protest has become a gloriously eccentric celebration of the human body in all its shapes and sizes. (Free) Learn about the men behind the music.It’s hard to argue that the actor/director relationship is at the heart of any great work, and on June 17, director John Landis is at the British Film Institute to talk about working with Dan Ackroyd and John Belushi on his 1980 comedy classic, “The Blues Brothers.
See full article at Backstage »

Dan Aykroyd Pays Tribute To Carrie Fisher At Actress’ Emotional Joint Memorial With Debbie Reynolds

  • ET Canada
Carrie Fisher will always have a special place in Dan Aykroyd’s heart. The 64-year-old actor, who was once engaged to Fisher after proposing to her on the set of their 1980 film, “The Blues Brothers”, took the stage on Saturday to deliver an emotional tribute to the actress at the joint memorial for her and […]
See full article at ET Canada »

The Blues Brothers Lego Ideas concept reaches 10,000 supporters

Jake and Elwood Blues could soon be coming to a Lego Store near you, as Kai Einfeldt’s The Blues Mobile Lego Ideas concept has become the first project to hit 10,000 supporters to qualify for the First 2017 Review Stage.

Kai’s set is based upon the Dodge Monaco patrol car from the 1980 classic The Blues Brothers, and also comes with two minifigures for John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd’s Jake and Elwood. Here’s some images of the set…

See Also: Follow all of our Lego coverage here
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Pretty Packaging: The Blues Brothers Gets A German Edition Worth Going To Jail For

When I heard that a company in Germany was bringing out a special extended edition of John Landis' 1980 comedy The Blues Brothers, a few thoughts went through my mind. First of all, was it truly an extended version or did it put back scenes excised for the German market back in 1980? Hell, I could think of some... but apparently Germany got the same version in 1980 we all got, and the extended version is indeed a 15 minute longer cut edited by John Landis in 1999. The second question in my mind was: why is Germany the only country to bring out such a royally pimped edition? And the answer to that apparently has to do with the German tradition of dubbing all...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

'Catastrophe' Star and Writer Rob Delaney Remembers His TV Mom Carrie Fisher: She Was 'So Brilliant'

'Catastrophe' Star and Writer Rob Delaney Remembers His TV Mom Carrie Fisher: She Was 'So Brilliant'
Rob Delaney is remembering his Catastrophe co-star, Carrie Fisher.

The 39-year-old actor opened up about acting alongside Fisher in a hilarious and heartwarming piece published in The Guardian on Wednesday, in which he describes writing extra scenes to accommodate his brilliantly funny co-star, and his lifelong admiration and love for her.

Watch: Mark Hamill Mourns 'My Beloved Space-Twin' Carrie Fisher: 'This Is Downright Heartbreaking'

Fisher died on Tuesday after going into cardiac arrest last week during a flight from London to Los Angeles. She was in the U.K. filming scenes for Delaney's Amazon series, Catastrophe.

"Yes, I knew Carrie Fisher. She played my mom on Catastrophe, the sitcom I write and star in with Sharon Horgan. Or should I say, 'plays my mom,' since we just finished shooting last week and Carrie's scenes haven't been seen by anyone yet. Except for me and Sharon that is, and our director, producer and editor
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Carrie Fisher’s ‘Catastrophe’ Co-Star Rob Delaney Pens Emotional Tribute to His Onscreen Mom

Carrie Fisher’s ‘Catastrophe’ Co-Star Rob Delaney Pens Emotional Tribute to His Onscreen Mom
In the wake of Carrie Fisher’s death on Tuesday, many celebrities and co-stars have paid tribute to the “Star War” icon on social media. Now Rob Delaney, creator and star of “Catastrophe,” wrote a touching essay dedicated to his onscreen mom for The Guardian.

“Yes, I knew Carrie Fisher. She played my mom on ‘Catastrophe,’ the sitcom I write and star in with Sharon Horgan. Or should I say, ‘plays my mom,’ since we just finished shooting last week and Carrie’s scenes haven’t been seen by anyone yet. Except for me and Sharon that is, and our director, producer and editor,” he began. “We’ve seen them and they’re amazing.”

Read More: Carrie Fisher’s ‘Star Wars’ Family and More Celebrities Mourn Her Death on Twitter

Fisher portrayed Mia in Season 1 and 2 of the Amazon series, appearing in a total of four episodes. According to Delaney,
See full article at Indiewire »

Carrie Fisher's work on Episode VIII completed prior to unfortunate passing

  • JoBlo
The world mourns the loss of Carrie Fisher. While she is of course remembered as the strong-willed and fiesty Princess Leia, she was so much more than that. Beyond being a prolific character actress (in films such as The Blues Brothers, When Harry Met Sally, and Austin Powers), she was also one of the most expensive and sought after script doctors in the business for a while. She worked her magic on such... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »
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