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30 Best World War II Movies for D-Day Anniversary (Photos)

  • The Wrap
Looking to look back on some history this Memorial Day? Critics and audiences alike didn’t think “Pearl Harbor” did WWII justice, but here are 29 other films that scored a 7/10 rating or higher on IMDb.

Pearl Harbor” (2001).

The Michael Bay-directed film starred Ben Affleck, Josh Hartnett and Kate Beckinsale and follows the story of two best friends as they go off to war.

Saving Private Ryan” (1998).

Starring Tom Hanks, Matt Damon, Tom Sizemore and Edward Burns, the film follows a group of U.S. soldiers that go behind enemy lines to retrieve a paratrooper.

The Thin Red Line” (1998).

Terrence Malick‘s adaptation of James Jones’ 1962 novel stars Jim Caviezel, Sean Penn and Nick Nolte, and focuses on the conflict at Guadalcanal.

A Midnight Clear” (1992).

The film starring Peter Berg, Kevin Dillon and Arye Gross tells the story of the American intelligence unit which finds a German platoon wishing to surrender.
See full article at The Wrap »

'Babette's Feast' star Stéphane Audran dies aged 85

'Babette's Feast' star Stéphane Audran dies aged 85
She was well-known for her long creative partnership with husband Claude Chabrol.

French actress Stéphane Audran, who starred in The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie and Babette’s Feast, has died aged 85.

Their son, actor Thomas Chabrol, told Afp: “She had been ill for some time. She had been in hospital for 10 days and she had returned home. She died peacefully at around 2 am [on Tuesday 27 March]”.

The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie and Babette’s Feast both won best foreign film at the Oscars. She won best actress at the Baftas for the former and was nominated again for the latter.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Siegfried Rauch, Steve McQueen's Racing Rival in 'Le Mans,' Dies at 85

Siegfried Rauch, the German actor who portrayed Steve McQueen's ruthless racing rival Erich Stahler in the 1971 classic film Le Mans, has died. He was 85.

Rauch died Sunday night as a result of a fall in his hometown of Untersochering, Bavaria, his agency announced.

Rauch also appeared in the war films Patton (1970), directed by Franklin J. Schaffner; John Sturges' The Eagle Has Landed (1976); George P. Cosmatos' Escape to Athena (1979); and Sam Fuller's The Big Red One (1980).

Le Mans, directed by Lee H. Katzin, tells the story of the Porsche and Ferrari rivalry through the eyes...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Siegfried Rauch, Steve McQueen's Racing Rival in 'Le Mans,' Dies at 85

Siegfried Rauch, Steve McQueen's Racing Rival in 'Le Mans,' Dies at 85
Siegfried Rauch, the German actor who portrayed Steve McQueen's ruthless racing rival Erich Stahler in the 1971 classic film Le Mans, has died. He was 85.

Rauch died Sunday night as a result of a fall in his hometown of Untersochering, Bavaria, his agency announced.

Rauch also appeared in the war films Patton (1970), directed by Franklin J. Schaffner; John Sturges' The Eagle Has Landed (1976); George P. Cosmatos' Escape to Athena (1979); and Sam Fuller's The Big Red One (1980).

Le Mans, directed by Lee H. Katzin, tells the story of the Porsche and Ferrari rivalry through the eyes...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘The Simpsons,’ ‘Sushi Girl’ and Mark Hamill’s Greatest Roles In This Galaxy

‘The Simpsons,’ ‘Sushi Girl’ and Mark Hamill’s Greatest Roles In This Galaxy
Mark Hamill isn’t just known for “Star Wars,” as any fan of “The Big Red One” or “Corvette Summer” will attest. The actor talked about how some of these other parts came to be.

Sushi Girl” (2012)

Hamill played a gang member in the ultraviolent cult indie that uses, among other things, creative dental work as a form of torture. “I was reading the script and thought it was very Tarantino, ‘Reservoir Dogs’ style, but I didn’t think I could do it. It was way too violent and I’m married to a dental hygienist, I can’t do this dental violence! Then my daughter said, ‘How often have we heard you complain you’re not considered for Steve Buscemi or William H. Macy or Phillip Seymour Hoffman parts?’ And I said, ‘You’re right.’” And it turned out to be a wonderful experience.”

Voice-Over Work

An expert mimic,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Kill, Baby…Kill! – The Blu Review

Review by Roger Carpenter

During the first half of the 60’s Mario Bava created several genuine horror classics that remain high-water marks in the genre over a half century later. Films such as Black Sunday (1960), Black Sabbath (1963), The Whip and the Body (1963), and Blood and Black Lace (1964) either pushed the boundaries of horror or helped to establish cinematic tropes still used in modern horror. Always saddled with shoestring budgets and bad deals, Bava nevertheless remained optimistic in the face of his cinematic struggles. A case in point is the troubled production of Kill, Baby…Kill! which ran out of money midway through the shoot. The cast and crew were so loyal to Bava they worked for free to finish the film—a film, by the way, which only had a 30-page script with no dialogue when filming commenced. Bava had the actors make up their own lines, preferring to resolve
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Review: "Cheech And Chong's Next Movie" (1980); Shout! Factory Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Cheech and Chong’s Next Movie, which opened on Friday, July 18, 1980, had stiff competition at the box office: Airplane!, The Empire Strikes Back, The Shining, Friday the 13th, The Blue Lagoon, The Big Red One, Dressed to Kill, Fame, and The Blues Brothers were all in major release at the time. While Next Movie and did respectable business, it went on to gross even more moola when Universal released is on a double bill with John Landis’s beloved Blues Brothers later. The film picks up sometime after Cheech and Chong’s maiden cinematic outing, Up in Smoke, left off two years earlier. Written by the slapdash and seemingly always high dynamic duo and directed by the latter of the two, Next Movie plays out like their comedy album routines (“Dave” from their self-titled 1971 debut album is one of their best-known and funniest bits) which is exactly
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Martin Scorsese Remembers Richard Schickel, ‘A Very Perceptive Critic and a Wonderful Writer’

  • Indiewire
Martin Scorsese Remembers Richard Schickel, ‘A Very Perceptive Critic and a Wonderful Writer’
Martin Scorsese has shared his thoughts on Richard Schickel, the influential film critic who passed away at 84 on Saturday. Schickel wrote dozens of books, most recently his 2015 memoir “Keepers: The Greatest Films — and Personal Favorites — of a Moviegoing Lifetime,” and served as film critic for Time from 1965–2010. Read Scorsese’s statement below.

Read More: Martin Scorsese Reveals the Status of His Upcoming Film ‘Devil in the White City’ With Leonardo DiCaprio

Richard Schickel was a very perceptive critic and a wonderful writer and documentary filmmaker,” writes the filmmaker. “As a person he was, to use a once popular term, ‘crusty,’ and he could be brutally funny. But it’s his deep and abiding love of movies that I’ll always remember about him. His early 70s PBS series ‘The Men Who Made the Movies,’ his 2004 restoration of Sam Fuller’s ‘The Big Red One,’ his wonderful little book about ‘Double Indemnity,
See full article at Indiewire »

Richard Schickel, Influential Time Magazine Film Critic, Dies at 84

Richard Schickel, Influential Time Magazine Film Critic, Dies at 84
Richard Schickel, the longtime film critic for Time magazine who also wrote 37 books, mostly on film, and directed a number of documentaries on film subjects, died on Saturday in Los Angeles of complications from a series of strokes, his family told the Los Angeles Times. He was 84.

“He was one of the fathers of American film criticism,” his daughter, writer Erika Schickel, told the Times. “He had a singular voice. When he wrote or spoke, he had an old-fashioned way of turning a phrase. He was blunt and succinct both on the page and in life.”

He wrote and/or directed more than 30 documentaries, mostly for television.

Schickel shared a 1977 Emmy nomination for the documentary “Life Goes to the Movies” and received two nominations in 1987 for the documentary “Minnelli on Minnelli: Liza Remembers Vincente,” which he directed.

Schickel wrote film reviews for Life magazine from 1965 until the magazine folded in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Episode 179 – Criterion Collection Wish List for 2017

Episode Links Past Wish List Episodes Episode 63.9 – Disc 3 – Top Criterion Blu-ray Upgrades for 2011 Episode 110 – Criterion Collection Blu-ray Upgrade Wish List for 2012 Episode 136 – Criterion Collection Blu-ray Upgrade Wish List for 2013 Episode 146 – Criterion Collection Blu-ray Upgrade Wish List for 2014 Episode 154 – Criterion Collection Blu-ray Upgrade Wish List for 2015 Episode 169 – Criterion Collection Blu-ray Upgrade Wish List for 2016 DVD to BluRay Wish Lists Aaron: The Shop on Main Street Pickup on South Street Arik: Cleo from 5 to 7 Berlin Alexanderplatz Mark: Taste of Cherry Sisters David: Do the Right Thing Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters Ld to Blu-Ray Wish Lists Aaron: Blue Velvet (Announced as Ld Spine #219 but never released) Early Hitchcock Box (Sabotage, The Secret Agent, Young and Innocent, The Lodger, The Man Who Knew Too Much) Arik: A Night at the Opera Singin’ in the Rain Mark: 2001: A Space Odyssey The Producers David: I Am Cuba Letter From an Unknown Woman
See full article at CriterionCast »

Matt Zoller Seitz on ‘The Oliver Stone Experience’ and the Decline of American Cinema

It’s safe to say Oliver Stone isn’t exactly fashionable these days, a matter apparent in how the trailer for Snowden instantly became a punching bag on this writer’s Twitter feed. Yet film critic Matt Zoller Seitz’s behemoth of a book, The Oliver Stone Experience, should, with any luck, shift the conversation. Framed as a series of interviews with Stone conducted over the past half-decade or so and interspersed with everything from personal photos to studio-executive notes to archival reviews, this feels like the definitive text on someone once at the center of American cinema. It might not change anyone’s mind on Stone’s films, but with the man being such a raconteur, you’ll still find yourself tearing through it.

We were lucky enough to chat with Seitz over the phone about his undertaking, as well as some thoughts on American politics and cinema in general.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Criterion Close-Up – Episode 49 – Twilight Time Appreciation Show

We change things up by focusing on a boutique label, Twilight Time, that has found success through a unique business model. Mark and Aaron happen to be big fans, and feel that we have directly contributed towards some of their profits. We talk about the company, their business model, why they have succeeded, and we address some common critiques. We also review a few discs each, and finally count down our favorite Twilight Time titles.

About Nick Redman:

London-born Nick Redman, one of Hollywood’s leading producers of movie music, is also an award-winning documentary filmmaker. An Academy Award nominee as producer of the 1996 Warner Brothers documentary, The Wild Bunch: An Album in Montage, he went on to write, produce, and direct A Turning of the Earth: John Ford, John Wayne and The Searchers (1998), which became a prize-winner at multiple film festivals.

As a consultant to the Fox Music
See full article at CriterionCast »

Lee Marvin Died 29 Years Ago Today – Here Are His Ten Best Films

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Lee Marvin rose through the ranks of movie stardom as a character actor, delivering mostly villainous supporting turns in many films before finally graduating to leading roles. Regardless of which side of the law he was on however, he projected a tough-as-nails intensity and a two-fisted integrity which elevated even the slightest material. Born February 19, 1924, in New York City, Marvin quit high school to enter the Marine Corps and while serving in the South Pacific was badly wounded in battle when a machine gun nest shot off part of his buttocks and severed his sciatic nerve. He spent a year in recovery before returning to the U.S. where he began working as a plumber. The acting bug bit after filling in for an ailing summer-stock actor and he studied the art at the New York-based American Theater Wing. Upon making his debut in summer stock,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Star Wars: Mark Hamill on Being Luke Skywalker, ‘Episode VIII’

Star Wars: Mark Hamill on Being Luke Skywalker, ‘Episode VIII’
London — Luke Skywalker himself, Mark Hamill, kicked off proceedings at Star Wars Celebration Europe at London’s ExCel Centre on Friday with an admission.

“People say, “Give us a detail about ‘Episode VIII,’ ” he told the packed crowd. “I know you’ll love the irony that I am contractually forbidden to do so.”

When we last saw Luke Skywalker at the end of “The Force Awakens,” he was hiding out in a Jedi Temple on the aquatic planet Ahch-To. Rey (Daisy Ridley) tracks him down and hands him his lightsaber. Then, the movie ends — Hamill doesn’t utter a single word of dialogue in the film. Director J.J. Abrams called the moment “this great long drum roll up to seeing this guy,” but Hamill revealed he was initially skeptical.

“I was nervous,” he continued. “Say I turned and people groaned? But I want to do all movies like that — 30 seconds work and second billing.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street

The irrepressible Sam Fuller fashions a crime thriller for German TV with his expected eccentricity: old-fashioned hardboiled scripting, freeform direction and bits of graffiti from the French New Wave. Christa Lang is the femme fatale and Glenn Corbett is the twofisted American hero, whose name is Not Griff. And yes, a pigeon does bite the pavement on Beethoven Street, and I tell you, that's one dead pigeon. Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street Blu-ray Olive Films 1974 / Color / 1:33 flat full frame (for German TV / 127 min. / Tote Taube in der Beethovenstraße / Street Date April 19, 2016 / / available through the Olive Films website / 29.95 Starring Glenn Corbett, Christa Lang, Sieghardt Rupp, Anton Diffring, Stéphane Audran, Alexander D'Arcy, Anthony Chinn. Cinematography Jerzy Lipman Film Editor Liesgret Schmitt-Klink Original Music The Can German dialogue by Manfred R. Köhler Produced by Joachim von Mengershausen Written and Directed by Samuel Fuller

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Not that it helped Sam Fuller's career much,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Veteran Voice Director Kelly Ward Helps Bring Out the Roar in Disney Channel’s ‘Lion Guard’

Veteran Voice Director Kelly Ward Helps Bring Out the Roar in Disney Channel’s ‘Lion Guard’
When Disney Television Animation execs decided to create a series spinoff from the classic film “The Lion King,” they turned to veteran voice director Kelly Ward to ensure the vocal performances in “The Lion Guard” would roar to life.

The series premieres Friday, Jan. 15, with back-to-back episodes beginning at 9:30 a.m. on the Disney Channel.

The Lion Guard,” which has a decidedly ecological spin, follows the exploits of Kion, the Prince of the Pride Lands and the second cub of the original film’s Simba and Nala. He and his friends — a cheetah, a hippotamus, a cattle egret and a honey badger — make up the Lion Guard to protect their homeland.

The series initially kicked off with a TV movie, “The Lion Guard: Return of the Roar,” last November. It drew impressive ratings for the Disney Channel, averaging 5.358 million viewers, according to Nielsen’s “live plus-3” estimates.

Ward has
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'Willy Wonka,' 'Saving Private Ryan,' 'Big Lebowski' added to National Film Registry

  • Hitfix
'Willy Wonka,' 'Saving Private Ryan,' 'Big Lebowski' added to National Film Registry
Each year, the Library of Congress selects 25 films to be named to the National Film Registry, a proclamation of commitment to preserving the chosen pictures for all time. They can be big studio pictures or experimental short films, goofball comedies or poetic meditations on life. The National Film Registery "showcases the extraordinary diversity of America’s film heritage and the disparate strands making it so vibrant" and by preserving the films, the Library of Congress hopes to "a crucial element of American creativity, culture and history.” This year’s selections span the period 1913 to 2004 and include a number of films you’re familiar with. Unless you’ve never heard of "Saving Private Ryan," "The Big Lebowski," “Rosemary’s Baby” or "Ferris Bueller's Day Off." Highlights from the list include the aforementioned film, Arthur Penn’s Western "Little Big Man," John Lasseter’s 1986 animated film, “Luxo Jr.," 1953’s “House of Wax,
See full article at Hitfix »

‘Saving Private Ryan’, ‘Ferris Bueller’ & More Added To National Film Registry

‘Saving Private Ryan’, ‘Ferris Bueller’ & More Added To National Film Registry
Spanning the years 1913-2004, the 25 films to be added to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry for 2014 include Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan, Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby, Arthur Penn’s Little Big Man, John Hughes’ Ferris Bueller’s Day Off and the Coen brothers’ The Big Lebowski. The annual selection helps to ensure that the movies will be preserved for all time. This year’s list brings the number of films in the registry to 650.

Also on the list are John Lasseter’s 1986 animated film, Luxo Jr; the original Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory with Gene Wilder; and Howard Hawks’ classic 1959 Western Rio Bravo. Documentaries and silent films also make up part of the selection which represents titles that are “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant; they must also each be at least 10 years old. Check out the rundown of all 25 movies below:

2014 National Film Registry
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Samantha Fuller's "A Fuller Life"

  • MUBI
A photograph of Samuel Fuller in "the shack."

It is always well to remember that documentaries are first of all films like other films, meaning that no less than fictional narrative movies, they too have a narrative shaped by the vision of their maker and are not only about their subjects but also are that vision and the individual elements that make it up. So, in A Fuller Life there are a number of choices that Samantha Fuller as director has made, for example to film in “the shack”—the bungalow her father kept as office and filled with his memorabilia from his days as a crime reporter, an infantryman in WWII, a writer and filmmaker; or to use her “readers” (including both actors—mostly from Fuller’s movies—and some well-chosen directors) dramatically, effectively acting their readings from Fuller’s posthumous autobiography A Third Face; or, very simply, to
See full article at MUBI »

No "Hollywood Heroes" In Brad Pitt's "Fury"

  • CinemaRetro
Dave Worrall reports from London, where the film is scheduled to open this week.

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There was no laughter in the audience following this morning's press show for David Ayer's WWII drama Fury - just stunned silence, as we all walked out feeling battered and bruised after watching two hours of the most brutal and realistic scenes of war ever captured on film. Set in the last month of the European theatre of war in April 1945, as the Allies make their final push into Nazi Germany, we are introduced to the world of four tough GI's and their new rookie, who go into battle in their tank named 'Fury'. It's dark and grim, and portrays the horrors of war similar to that of the D-Day sequence in Saving Private Ryan - but far worse. As the film unfolds you
See full article at CinemaRetro »
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