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7/10
Fantastic Fun
no-skyline27 January 2006
This is one of the quality films from Jackie's early years made the year after Snake in Eagles Shadow with much of the same cast and crew this built on the comedic style of Kung Fu action that Jackie was to make his own. Of the two films I actually prefer the earlier Snake in.... but its this later film that is more often considered Chan's earliest masterpiece.

This is a more traditional set kung-fu film than the later stunt fests that made his name. The fighting styles on show are unique, inventive and fascinating to watch. The showdowns are impressive and with no trick photography, CG or massive effects fueled blow outs and shows just how good a martial artist Jackie is. The comedy works well and Jackies on screen master is very funny and they spark well off each other as a team.

This is a really good old style kung fu flick fans of Jackies later work such as Rush Hour etc. may not find what their looking for here this is Jackie in one of his most pure kung fu movies. But for anyone who loves martial arts you must see this!! Great entertainment 7/10
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10/10
The film that propelled Jackie to stardom
AwesomeWolf6 January 2005
I am not very familiar with the true story of Wong Fei Hung. I've read about him before, and from memory, he was an exceptional martial artist (he practiced Hung-Gar) and became a folk-hero to the people of China, much like his father, Wong Kei Ying. So there is the true story, and then there is the 200 or so movies made about him. 'Drunken Master' is one of these.

I haven't seen most of those 200 movies, except for the Drunken Master movies, Jet Li's 'Once Upon a Time in China' series, and 'Iron Monkey'. The 'Once Upon a Time in China' movies and 'Iron Monkey' may be somewhat over-the-top wu xia movies, but they portray Wong Fei Hung as a serious hero. 'Drunken Master' features a very different take on the character.

Jackie Chan's Wong Fei Hung is a rebellious trouble-maker. His father, Wong Kei Ying, has given up on disciplining him, and sends him to his uncle, So Hai, the master of drunken boxing, hoping that a year of training with So Hai will sort Fei Hung out. Fei doesn't seem to learn his lesson until a chance encounter with Thunderfoot (Hwang Jang Lee)...

Story-wise, it is a bit of a standard kung-fu plot. However, in a documentary on Jackie Chan (I can't remember the name, I know that as of this review, it isn't listed on IMDb, but it was shown on SBS in 2003), 'Drunken Master' was mentioned as his breakthrough hit that nearly killed his career: Apparently Chinese viewers were insulted by Jackie's portrayal of Wong Fei Hung and nearly boycotted him when he was just gaining fame as an actor.

Onto more important matters. Like kung-fu. 'Drunken Master' is one of the kung-fu classics. Boosted by the presence of martial-arts star Hwang Jang Lee, this pretty much made or solidified the careers of Jackie Chan and Yuen Woo Ping (in his directorial debut). 'Drunken Master' features some very well choreographed fights and training scenes. 'Drunken Master' is very funny too, and is one of two movies I know where a young main-character gets beaten by an older middle-aged lady (which is always funny, more movies need a scene like this) - the other movie is Battlefield Baseball.

As a matter of interest for Jackie Chan fans: 'Drunken Master' signaled the end of Jackie Chan's work with director Wei Lo. Yay. In fact, the Columbia Tristar DVD release of 'Drunken Master' includes audio commentary by experts on Hong Kong cinema. I will check that out sometime, but it sounds like it would appeal to fans of kung-fu movies. Some more trivia - the latest release doesn't have the complete Cantonese sound track, and so the English dub is used where the Cantonese track is incomplete.

'Drunken Master' features awesome kung-fu scenes, and has some interesting historical perspectives. Ah, kung-fu movies and history, some of my favourite hobbies together at last - 10/10, a must see for any fans of Jackie Chan or kung-fu movies, 'Drunken Master' is kung-fu perfection.
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9/10
not only lives up to legend, it creates it
winner5529 June 2006
It is said that this is the film that made Jackie Chan a star, but that isn't really true, since Snake in Eagle's Shadow actually had a bigger impact at the time, and allowed Chan to make this film. One way we know this is that there are some two dozen films made in the late '70s- early'80's designed to imitate Snake in Eagle's Shadow, and only a couple imitate this film. By the time Drunken Master had become legendary world-wide, the chop-socky cycle (to which it still belongs, to an extent) had passed into history, and Chan himself had abandoned historical 'fu films for contemporary comedy-thrillers.

It should be noted that the idea of making a film based on the early years of Wong Fei Hong was not original to Chan; at roughly the same time this film was being made, well-known martial arts choreographer Liu Chia Leung made a straight (non-comic) version of the story (without drunken boxing) over at Shaw Brothers, Challenge of the Masters, with Gordon Liu as Wong Fei Hung.

The defining moment for the Chan-Yuen version of the film is the use of Drunken Boxing. There is no real evidence that the historical Wong Fei Hung was a master of this style; his more famous innovations involved the development of the shadowless hand technique and the no-shadow kick. Interestingly, in order to highlight Chan's use of Drunken Boxing, these other two techniques, better identified with Wong, are assigned in the film to the villain, "Thunderlegs" played by Hwang Jen Lee.

At any rate, it would not be clear that one could consider this a Wong Fei Hung film at all - if it weren't for the fact that this film effectively redefined the Wong legend, so that it has since become pro-forma to assume that Wong was a bit wild in his youth. (Just to set that record straight, Wong was actually extremely studious, and recognized as a real child-prodigy in the martial arts, winning his first major public duel at the age of thirteen.) Drunken Master is solid martial arts entertainment. There are decided weaknesses in the plot and over-all staging of the film, but these can easily be ignored, as the film thrusts us along with kung fu and comedy to the grand final fight at the end. It must also be noted that these characters - even the villain - are well acted and quite likable and familiar, and thus add a credibility to the film. And Yuen's direction is also very professional and a couple notches above the average for a Hong Kong genre film of the time.

Lives up to its own legend, and well-worth the viewing.
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Jackie Chan's finest hour
Mash khan8 December 2004
This for me is Jackie Chan's finest, and is the film which propelled him to super stardom in Hong Kong. Whilst other martial artists were trying to be the new Bruce Lee, Jackie did something different. Why replace the irreplaceable when you could do something completely different? What Jackie did was introduce slapstick into the Kung Fu formula, the rest as they say is history.

Jackie stars as Freddy Wong aka (Wong Fei Hung) depending upon which dub you watch. A juvenile delinquent with a penchant for feeling up immediate female members of his family. His father, fed up of his delinquency hires Sam Seed aka The Drunken Master to teach him some discipline as well as his secret fighting style. Naturally the two get off on the wrong foot but learn to respect each other as the film goes on whilst of course getting into the obligatory scrapes and japes. There is of course a villain of the piece in this case its the Tae Kwan Do master Hwang Jan Lee as the underworld assassin "Thunderfoot" who in real life was just as badass as he is in the film.

So it's all pretty derivative then? Well yes and no. There is a genuine rapport between Jackie and Yu Su Tien as pupil and teacher. The martial arts is brilliantly choreographed and inventive (the scene in the restaurant is probably my favourite) and the whole thing has a "joie de vivre". Watching it, it seems to me that the actors had a ball making the film. Which is just as well as I had a ball watching it.
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Classic Chan
gwerq17 March 1999
This is my favourite jackie chan film. It's one of the funniest films i've ever seen. It starts with a fight and ends with one,so the action crowd won't be disappointed! Plus it contains the funniest scenes chan has ever put on film,such as the taunting of his idiotic teacher and the horror of realising the woman who he picks a fight with is his auntie!Brilliant.
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Jackie Chan's finest hour
Mash khan3 December 2004
This for me is Jackie Chan's finest, and is the film which propelled him to super stardom in Hong Kong. Whilst other martial artists were trying to be the new Bruce Lee, Jackie did something different. Why replace the irreplaceable when you could do something completely different? What Jackie did was introduce slapstick into the Kung Fu formula, the rest as they say is history.

Jackie stars as Freddy Wong aka (Fong Sai Yuk) depending upon which dub you watch. A juvenile delinquent with a penchant for feeling up immediate female members of his family. His father, fed up of his delinquency hires Sam Seed aka The Drunken Master to teach him some discipline as well as his secret fighting style. Naturally the two get off on the wrong foot but learn to respect each other as the film goes on whilst of course getting into the obligatory scrapes and japes. There is of course a villain of the piece in this case its the Tae Kwan Do master Hwang Jan Lee as the underworld assassin "Thunderfoot" who in real life was just as badass as he is in the film.

So it's all pretty derivative then? Well yes and no. There is a genuine rapport between Jackie and Yu Su Tien as pupil and teacher. The martial arts is brilliantly choreographed and inventive (the scene in the restaurant is probably my favourite) and the whole thing has a "joie de vivre". Watching it, it seems to me that the actors had a ball making the film. Which is just as well as I had a ball watching it.
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9/10
Two Thumbs Up, and Kicking the Crap Out of You, Like a Drunk...
Thomas Hardcastle31 May 2008
What a wonderful film. This film has to rank amongst Chan's ultimate. There are so many incredible fights in this film, that you will certainly feel you're getting your money's worth.

The action is entertaining and beautiful. The comedy is rich and memorable.

I love the different factors that make a Hong Kong movie what it is. One of these factors is the quick zoom out from a shocked face, to the completed action. My favourite of these is in the restaurant, when Yuen Woo Ping's father laughs, then stops, as a fist comes into shot. The punch is blocked, and the camera zooms out, for the rest of the moves in the take. It's wonderful to watch, as it adds personality to the film, and tells you, "I'm from seventies Hong Kong, and I'm not gonna change for you!" Overall, one of my favourite films, and definitely one of Jackie's best.
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10/10
I wish I could fight Drunken fist Style.
Baker-635 August 2007
This movie is easily one of Jackie's best, even if it is one of his first roles where he plays a significant part. The fighting was amazing, and the training sessions with the red nosed master were funny as hell. I don't see Jackie complaining as much as he did as his character, but that didn't hurt it too bad.

The only thing I didn't like about this movie was in the English dub, they refer Wong Fei-Hung as "Freddy Hung". Seriously, Freddy?! That doesn't even sound like a name a martial artist would have! The kid that got his father knocked down also kind of irked me, as his voice sounded like it was being done by a older guy trying to imitate a kids voice. It just doesn't work.

The movie also had some kind of annoying sound effects, as was accustomed to older kung-fu movies. That loud whip-cracking noise whenever someone threw a blow, or got it blocked or hit someone. And there was also that wind cutting noise whenever someone threw a strike or moved their hands or feet. Besides these little annoyances, this was a great movie.

I actually tried to see if there were teachers that could teach me Drunken Boxing, but I found out the style can take many years to learn as it requires much former training in previous martial arts.
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6/10
Get drunk with this Kung Fu comedy...
Paul Magne Haakonsen15 August 2012
Being a fan of Jackie Chan and never having seen "Drunken Master" before 2012 is sacrilege, I know, but I just never gotten around to it, not even with all the high praises for this 1978 movie.

Well, I finally got around to watch it and it was with some expectation and anticipation to it. Was it worth it? Well, yeah it was, but at the same time it wasn't all that I had expected.

The story was fun and well-thought through, about Wong Fei-Hung who is a rascal, dishonoring his father who is a Kung Fu master. As a punishment he is to train with his uncle who is said to be ruthless and mean. The young Fei-Hung is in for some rough training, but eventually comes to see the meaning of the tough training.

"Drunken Master" is more of a comedy (or Comedy Fu, if you will) than it is an actual Kung Fu movie. There is a lot of slapstick comedy in this movie, as is to be expected from a Chan movie. But it also shows off the grace, dexterity and skills of Jackie Chan quite well. However, for the Kung Fu, well it was fun to watch, lots of great movies and funny situations, but wow it was so horribly staged that it was painful to watch at times. It just lacked that natural flow to it, to make it seem realistic and natural. I am not saying that it wasn't enjoyable, far from it, just don't expect it to be all that and a bucket of chicken, because it was really staged from start till end.

This Jackie Chan movie is a definite must have in any DVD collection of any Jackie Chan fan, just don't do the mistake that I did that compare this movie with the movies from the last two decades.

I got a Sony DVD release of the movie from Amazon, and despite playing the original Cantonese language track, it kept changing between Cantonese and some seriously doubtful English dubbing. The dubbing was so bad it was beyond belief, they were even doing racial, stereotypical slur at the dubbing - it was just horrible. Luckily the DVD was in Cantonese most of the time, but when it changed to English dub (by its own will) it was just painful to listen to. These movies are meant to be watched with the original language track. English dubbing always has, and always will, be a horrible experience.

And the ending of the movie, well I was stunned at that. It just ended immediately after the final showdown. It was the most abrupt and sudden ending to any movie that I have ever witnessed.
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10/10
Simply Jackie Chan at his finest
rustala10 June 2005
I don't have masses to say about this film, other than this by far Jackie Chan's finest hour. From the slapstick comedy and facial expression he always pulls out the bag, to the quite incredible feats of strength and endurance. There's not wires and extra stunt men, what you see is what you get! If you never see another Jackie Chan film see this. It's a shame he's taken so long to crack the mainstream, I've been a fan for years. I enjoy some of his more mainstream too, don't get me wrong, but if only western audiences were more familiar with his work 2 years ago, then perhaps he wouldn't have resulted in selling himself out for such films as the medallion.

If you liked this then check out some more of his back catalogue, a few personal favourites being 'police story' and rumble in the Bronx.

Long live the kung-fu master that is...
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10/10
A classic martial arts action-comedy
dee.reid28 December 2005
1978's "Drunken Master" contains the same manic, slapstick humor and acrobatic martial arts talents that would become a later trademark of Hong Kong action star Jackie Chan. This movie will have you rolling in your seat with laughter. Seriously, it has elements of "The Three Stooges" and balletic Keaton-like stunt-work so that in essence, "Drunken Master" is the perfect action-comedy.

Directed by Yuen Wo Ping, who would later become well-known to American audiences for his work on the "Matrix" films and the "Kill Bill" flicks, Chan stars as an undisciplined troublemaker who happens to be an expert martial artist. When his father disowns him following an incident with a close relative, Chan goes and finds apprenticeship with a drunkard hermit, who teaches him the ancient kung-fu fighting style of "drunken boxing."

For those that don't know, drunken boxing (a.k.a. "drunken fist" or "drunken master"), as the title would imply, is a martial arts style that utilizes the staggering, unfocused movements of the typical drunkard. Chan exercises the movements gracefully in one training sequence, and it's one of the most effective fighting techniques though one may need to have an incredibly flexible body to master it. Because of the apparently unfocused posture of the fighter, his movements are concealed from the opponent, making it nearly impossible to anticipate his strikes. (To be able to use the style though, I'm not sure if one needs to be genuinely intoxicated to master its movements.)

Chan eventually masters the techniques taught to him, and then uses his newfound skills to battle a lethal assassin who has since arrived to collect a price on his father's head.

I don't know what it is exactly that made me enjoy this picture so much. The character Chan plays has been the object of Chinese folklore for nearly two centuries, but he would later find more serious film characteristics in the "Once Upon a Time in China" movies with Jet Li. "Drunken Master" shows why Chan is the star he is today. The film captures his talents masterfully and is forthright in its execution of his hyper-active skills in the many fighting sequences.

I guess time has been good to "Drunken Master," since it's appeared on several all-time favorite lists for martial arts movies.

10/10
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7/10
bruce lee meets the three stooges...
tripperM24 January 2001
i have seen other jackie chan movies and have been glued to the wonderful choreography of the fights and laughed at his henny youngman-type humour but this is by far the BEST jc movie. i would have to say it's one of the best all around kung fu movies, too.

there is LOTS of humour, LOTS of shtick, and of course LOTS and LOTS of kung fu... crane kung fu, snake kung fu, tiger kung fu- i didn't know there were so many types of kung fu! seeing jc go through the "disciplines" is painful to watch, and auntie is cool! she makes sailor moon look like a power puff girl. this chick kicks a** with so much grace and style - and not a hair out of place! great, fun, popcorn-popin' movie.
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5/10
110 minutes of acrobatic physicality that is mindless, heartless, and without a story
c-blauvelt13 April 2006
Warning: Spoilers
The film that made Jackie Chan a star, Yuen Wo-Ping's "Drunken Master" constitutes a departure from previous Hong Kong cinema with its intensely comedic elements, while paying tribute to more ancient Chinese cultural traditions. The movie has very little plot relying instead on Jackie Chan's low-brow, Three Stooges-esquire comedic timing, and his acrobatic ability.

It begins with an action scene and really doesn't let up until the very end of the film. The plot concerns a feckless kung fu student (Chan) whose father forces him to study the fighting style of the Eight Drunken Gods. Of course, this means that Jackie fights his many opponents acting as if he is drunk. His physical comedy is impressive, such as his drunken stagger, his slapstick demeanor, and his acrobatic artistry is breathtaking. Chan was raised in the Peking opera, where he learned acrobatics and dancing in addition to the martial arts. This gives his fighting style a unique fluidity, as he tumbles, falls, and leaps out of the way of opponent's blows rather than confronting them head on, fist-to-fist. Most of the movie is really just him using his acrobatics to escape from superior enemies rather than actually fighting them. As impressive physically as this is, few fights actually seem to have any resolution, meaning that the fights do little to advance the narrative, functioning similarly to Busby Berkeley show-stoppers in his 1930 musicals.

Most of Chan's comedy is low humor, involving bodily functions, vomiting, hitting other people a la the Three Stooges, drunkenness, and harassing the opposite sex. The action scenes become monumentally repetitive, having a mind-numbing effect on the viewer by the time you reach the end of the movie. The acting is distorted and exaggerated for comedic effect, but becomes shamelessly boring when combined with the redundant action scenes. The only reason why I give this movie a 5 is for Chan's acrobatic ability. Really, that is the only thing going for this movie, since Yuen Wo-Ping doesn't concentrate at all on mastering the film's formal qualities. The editing is choppy with poor coverage of the individual scenes. Clearly all the fight scenes were edited in camera, so the emphasis is more on the choreography of the fights rather than the filming of them, making them seem rather static and lifeless actually. The movie fails in its formal, textual qualities, so its only draw is Jackie Chan's childish humor and acrobatics.
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10/10
Old School diamond in the rough...
poe4266 December 2008
Warning: Spoilers
Way back before wirework and cgi became the order of the day, there was something called old-fashioned hard work (which led, over a period of time, to skill, which could be refined). Jackie Chan paid his dues many times over and nowhere is it more evident than here, in one of his earliest efforts. While he would go on to do the spectacular LEGEND OF THE DRUNKEN MASTER (in which he literally brought the house down), DRUNKEN MASTER also showcases his many and varied talents to great effect. Watching him being put through his (often excruciating) paces makes one aware of the years of preparation that had to go into his training. And while his characters are more often than not put through the proverbial ringer physically, it's the mental and emotional pounding they take that makes them so sympathetic (see NEW POLICE STORY, in which Chan and his young co-stars go through the tortures of the damned before the final showdown). Great gung fu feature.
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10/10
Drunken Dubbing Master.
j_m_strang16 November 2008
I just bought a DVD copy of "Drunken Master", having owned it on VHS about 10 years back (but had lost it in my movements). I was shocked and disappointed to find the new version's dubbed English is a different and (in my opinion) far less amusing voice-over. Does anyone know where I can find the version that was for sale in the 90's- The one with such characters as "Old jade seller", "Sam Seed" and "The tough old bitch" with their 'proper' voices? I am at a loss to work out why the second English version exists at all- I only hope that some DVDs exist of the original. The later dubbing isn't as bad as all that, but people who have heard the original will agree (I hope!)

I realise purists will always prefer Cantonese, but for this single film I respectfully dissent.
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THE BEST OF THE MARTIAL ARTS COMEDIES
EL BUNCHO16 April 2002
Warning: Spoilers
There are those who prefer Jackie Chan's later work (the POLICE STORY series, WHO AM I?, RUMBLE IN THE BRONX), but give me the early stuff! DRUNKEN MASTER is the perfect balance between action and humor, and the story is pure fun from start to finish.

SPOILER WARNING!!!

Sort of a remake of the previous year's SNAKE IN THE EAGLE'S SHADOW (which was again sort-of-remade right after this one as THE FEARLESS HYENA), DRUNKEN MASTER tells the story of Freddy Wong (Wong Fei Hung in the original Chinese), the troublemaking son of a martial arts teacher, who is simply incapable of not getting into fights. At his wits' end, his father calls in his Freddy's uncle, the infamous Sam Tse, to discipline the boy. Sam Tse also happens to be a master of the "eight drunk gods" technique, which is fueled by Herculean ingestion of wine. When a drunken master gets loose, God help anyone foolish enough to fight him!!!

Freddy's training is so harsh that it could be seen as torture, so Freddy runs away because he is too lazy to learn it. Besides, he already knows his dad's style of kung fu, right? He promptly runs into a killer-for-hire who teaches the kid a humiliating lesson in the art of ass-whuppin'. He also engages Freddy in one of the all-time classic exchanges in a genre that is replete with classic exchanges:

BAD GUY- Hmmph! Who teaches you that kung fu? FREDDY (proudly)- My dad does! BAD GUY- Hmmph! Judging by your kung fu, he's useless! I wouldn't hire him to wipe my ass!!! (He then seriously kicks Freddy's sorry butt)

After that, Freddy trains hard in the eight drunk gods, and his transformation is a joy to behold. The sequence in which Jackie demonstrates seven of the eight forms is a jaw-dropping display of what a highly-trained martial artist/acrobat can do. YOU WILL BE AMAZED. Highly recommended, and whatever you do, don't miss Jackie's fight with an old lady in the middle of the street (old school kung fu fans, you know the rule: if the person is really old, DO NOT FIGHT THEM!!!), and his drunken-style fight with "the king of sticks." It's not as slick as Jackie's later films, but this one has fun and energy to burn!
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10/10
masterpiece of kung fu
royalyanghk5 September 2016
after watch the movie, impress by the Drunken Fist pattern very much. i tried to search Drunken Fist history in internet and even want to learn the pattern. based on the internet information, seems there never been really have any Drunken fist or Drunken master in Chinese history.

all the pattern perform by jackie chan in the movie, probably design by the movie kung fu design team/stunt and jackie chan.

the action design, fight pattern, original pattern design, hard to find any nowadays movie can compare.

jackie chan perform many action style in this movie very well and very impressive. one of the best kung fu movie.
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8/10
Jackie is staggering.
BA_Harrison29 June 2014
Directed by legendary kung fu choreographer Yuen Woo-Ping, Drunken Master is considered by many martial arts fans to be one of the best films of Jackie Chan's career, but while it certainly displays the star's kung fu and acrobatic ability to great effect, and is a thoroughly enjoyable watch, I found the plot just a little too generic (and the comedy a little too broad) to rate it any higher than an 8 (I actually give it a 7.5, but I've rounded my score up for IMDb).

There really is very little going on here in terms of storyline, and what there is most seasoned fans of old school martial arts fans will have seen countless times before: a young upstart, Wong Fei-Hung (Chan), causes trouble in his local town and is sent by his disappointed father to train with a kung fu master, Beggar Su (Siu Tin Yuen). Beggar Su's techniques are harsh but very effective, so when an assassin named Thunderfoot (Hwang Jang Lee) is hired to kill Fei-Hung's father, the young man is able to step in and save the day.

Jackie Chan's comedic style is very much in evidence here, with buffoonery, slapstick action, and fart and poo gags, plus quite a few characters with peculiar facial features (a hairy mole, a red nose, drawn on freckles and goofy teeth), and the humour will not appeal to all (I nearly always struggle with Chinese comedy). Thankfully, the excellent fighting more than makes up for the silliness, with Jackie performing some mind-bogglingly amazing feats of physical prowess, making the absolute most of his Chinese Circus training. He leaps, he flips, he tumbles, he kicks, and he punches, performing snake style, monkey style and—of course—drunken style, all with incredible energy, speed and split second timing; it's absolutely breathtaking to behold.

Naturally, Beggar Su and Thunderfoot are no slouches in the chop socky department either, the old drunken beggar pulling off some very cool moves against a baddie called The Stick King (Hsia Hsu) and Thunderfoot more than living up to his title: with his technique 30% hands and 70% legs, Hwang Jang Lee is given plenty of opportunity to show off his legendary kicking skills. Also very impressive in her small role as Wong Fei Hung's auntie is Linda Lin Ying: I don't know much about her, but the one fight scene she shares with Jackie is quite stunning—her flexibility and leg control made my jaw drop (I must check out some of the other titles in her filmography—Dance of the Drunk Mantis also stars Hwang Jang Lee, so that would seem like an obvious place to start).
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8/10
More than what I expected! It really shows what Jackie Chan was capable of doing in films
KineticSeoul17 August 2013
Now I saw "Legend of Drunken Master" first which is a kung-fu film that blew my mind because of it's awesomeness. And since this film didn't seem all that notorious, I shunned this one sorta. Despite it being the film with Jackie Chan showing his drunken boxing and being kind of a pioneer of that style. I just wasn't expecting this film to be so darn entertaining. Sure, it doesn't have that much resources going for it. But Jackie did just about everything physically possible. And it really did pay off. I also wasn't expecting such high comedic moments even for a Jackie Chan film and I was wrong in every way. This film has all that trademark Jackie Chan elements and it's highly entertaining and humorous. Sure it is kind of cheesy but it actually works for a film like this. And for a Kung-fu flick from the 70's it seemed to be ahead of it's time. I was either smirking or laughing most of the way through while watching this amazing kung-fu film. The plot does seem a bit random at times and more bonding parts with Jackie Chan and the Drunken Master would have been cool. This is like the way better version of "The Karate Kid", comparing because it does have slight similarities. Except this film came first. The creativity in this is also top notch, especially when it comes to the fight sequences. This film was made during the prime of Jackie Chan and it does show what Jackie is capable physically and athletically. I saw this with English Dub and despite Jackie's British accent, it wasn't bad. "Drunken Master" is one of Jackie Chan's best.

8.4/10
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9/10
Amazing
MyOpinionIsFact14 January 2005
Drunken Master is probably the movie that cemented Jackie Chan's stardom (credited as Jacky Chan). Although slightly addled by some the corniness that is common in Chinese comedies, there are also some very funny moments. But a martial arts movie, of course, is really about the fighting. What can I say? The kung fu starts out good and gets better and better and better until the final fight scene that you will want to watch multiple times (some parts in slow motion). The situations of the film will feel fresh and original to viewers that have seen mostly Hollywood films. As to be expected from an 1978 Asian movie, the sound and video are not up to today's standards and shouldn't be criticized because of that as is often done by young and naive viewers. This film offers you a chance to see expert martial artists doing physical stunts that almost nobody can do. If you can see the beauty in that (or dance, or bodybuilding, or anything else that requires dedication and loads of practice before the end product) you will love this movie. If not, Drunken Master will make you laugh a few times too.
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10/10
One of my favorites!
arielle-217 April 1999
Everyone's comments say it all. This movie has incredible fighting and incredible comedy. Make sure to check out the Snake in the Eagle's Shadow which also features the Drunken Master up to his tricks again...he is amazing with those gourds full of wine!
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More wine please!
blackman22 January 1999
Wonderful, brilliant, fantastic are a few words used to describe this film. This is one of the few Jackie Chan films that have got everything including, of course humour. The Kung-Fu is top rate and it's good entertainment. Let's hope Jackie Chan can get back to this top form.
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#1 FOR JACKIE CHAN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Nick_Vorobyov26 June 2001
This film rocks!!!!!!!!!!!!! This is the film that made Jackie famous at that time. This film is great on all levels. Lots of action plus comedy involved here. And of course the end is were we see Jackie get really drunk and fight the bad guy. Just like in "The Legend of Drunken Master". This film isn't as good as the sequel but still has it's moment's. This film has couple fight scenes but the end is the best I think. But I do like the very cool training sequence. Also you get to see Jackie fight "Bolo Yeung". A very good fighter. I licked the fight in the bar or what ever that was. I also liked the two or three fights were Jackie beats up some thugs. I think this film is really good. And I hope you agree. So go see Jackie get drunk and beat up on some thugs.
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8/10
Unbelievably Funny !!
ebiros27 June 2009
This of course is the famous movie that propelled Jacky Chan into stardom with new style of action movie - Kung-Fu comedy. But even for his movie, this one somehow is a notch funnier because the timing is so quick and action so raw. Back in the '70s people made no apologies about beating scoundrels up, and this strait forwardness in beating the opponent adds extra humor to the action.

This was before Jacky Chan had a family, and 24 year young Jack Chan's moves although not as refined as his later movies, have edge that's refreshing to watch.

For the first of its kind, this movie is so well made, and it still stands as one of the best kung-fu action comedy.

If you've missed seeing this movie, you really owe it to yourself to see it at least once.

History of Hong Kong cinema being made right in front of your eyes, that started the fantastic entertainment industry that is Jacky Chan and his movies, spanning the next 30 years and still counting.
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