7.5/10
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Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht (original title)
Trailer
2:14 | Trailer
Count Dracula moves from Transylvania to Wismar, spreading the Black Plague across the land. Only a woman pure of heart can bring an end to his reign of horror.

Director:

Werner Herzog

Writer:

Werner Herzog
5 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Klaus Kinski ... Count Dracula
Isabelle Adjani ... Lucy Harker
Bruno Ganz ... Jonathan Harker
Roland Topor ... Renfield
Walter Ladengast Walter Ladengast ... Dr. Van Helsing
Dan van Husen ... Warden
Jan Groth ... Harbormaster
Carsten Bodinus Carsten Bodinus ... Schrader
Martje Grohmann Martje Grohmann ... Mina
Rijk de Gooyer ... Town official (as Ryk de Gooyer)
Clemens Scheitz Clemens Scheitz ... Clerk
Lo van Hensbergen Lo van Hensbergen ... Harbormaster's Assistent
John Leddy John Leddy ... Coachman
Margiet van Hartingsveld Margiet van Hartingsveld ... Vrouw
Tim Beekman Tim Beekman ... Coffinbearer
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Storyline

Jonathan Harker is sent away to Count Dracula's castle to sell him a house in Wismar where Jonathan lives. But Count Dracula is a vampire, an undead ghoul living off of men's blood. Inspired by a photograph of Lucy Harker, Jonathan's wife, Dracula moves to Wismar, bringing with him death and plague... An unusually contemplative version of Dracula, in which the vampire bears the curse of not being able to get old and die. Written by Yepok

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Horror

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although Werner Herzog knew about the traditional vampire lore, he had no experience with vampire fiction beyond Bram Stoker's novel "Dracula", German director F.W. Murnau's classic Nosferatu (1922), and Roman Polanski's parody The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967). See more »

Goofs

When Harker walks along a rocky ledge by a river on his way to the Count's castle, a sturdy guardrail made of cement posts and thick metal wires is clearly visible along the edge of the path. See more »

Quotes

Warden: The patient that came in yesterday is having a fit.
Van Helsing: Which one?
Warden: The one that bit the cow.
See more »

Alternate Versions

The English-language version was only available in a shorter cut until 2000, which was about 10 minutes shorter. See more »

Connections

Version of Dracula (1931) See more »

Soundtracks

Vocal Ensemble Gordela: 'Zinzkaro'
Georgian folk music (uncredited)
Performed by Vocal Ansambl Gordela (uncredited)
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User Reviews

 
A work of art in motion
18 December 2006 | by Jonny_NumbSee all my reviews

If anybody ever founds a Vampire Museum (and who knows, somebody somewhere probably already has), it would be unjust to devote anything less than a wing to Werner Herzog's "Nosferatu," one of the most stunningly beautiful 'horror' films I've ever seen. While I place 'horror' in quotes, it is not because of a default urge to pigeonhole something into a genre to which it barely qualifies--no, it's because "Nosferatu" is like watching an exquisite painting magically put in motion. There is fear and eerie atmosphere aplenty (much of which is provided by a recurring classical music cue), mixed with a rat fixation that becomes oddly symbolic. Unlike F.W. Murnau's 1922 version, this 1979 remake is as much about the existential despair of the undead condition rather than simply the plight of a blood-sucking vampire; while many scenes are recreated shot-for-shot, Herzog is no plagiarist, and actually improves on many of the technical shortcomings that hindered Murnau's film decades before ('night' no longer looks like mid-day, for instance). The film's supernatural love triangle remains intact, and again hinges on Lucy Harker (Isabelle Adjani), who steals the movie from the none-too-modest talents of Klaus Kinski (Count Dracula) and Bruno Ganz (Jonathan Harker). While some may find it slow and ponderous, this "Nosferatu" is one of the best vampire films ever made (besting even Murnau's version), a moody character piece with visual ingenuity to spare.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

West Germany | France

Language:

German | English | Romany

Release Date:

17 January 1979 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Nosferatu the Vampyre See more »

Filming Locations:

Tatra Mountains, Slovakia See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,874
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (theatrical)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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