7.6/10
28,751
181 user 169 critic

Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht (original title)
Trailer
2:14 | Trailer

Watch Now

With Prime Video

ON DISC
ALL
Count Dracula moves from Transylvania to Wismar, spreading the Black Plague across the land. Only a woman pure of heart can bring an end to his reign of horror.

Director:

Werner Herzog

Writer:

Werner Herzog (book)
Reviews
5 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Nosferatu (1922)
Fantasy | Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

Vampire Count Orlok expresses interest in a new residence and real estate agent Hutter's wife.

Director: F.W. Murnau
Stars: Max Schreck, Alexander Granach, Gustav von Wangenheim
Fitzcarraldo (1982)
Adventure | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

The story of Brian Sweeney Fitzgerald, an extremely determined man who intends to build an opera house in the middle of a jungle.

Director: Werner Herzog
Stars: Klaus Kinski, Claudia Cardinale, José Lewgoy
Adventure | Biography | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

In the 16th century, the ruthless and insane Don Lope de Aguirre leads a Spanish expedition in search of El Dorado.

Director: Werner Herzog
Stars: Klaus Kinski, Ruy Guerra, Helena Rojo
Woyzeck (1979)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Franz Woyzeck is a hapless, hopeless soldier, alone and powerless in society, assaulted from all sides by forces he can not control.

Director: Werner Herzog
Stars: Klaus Kinski, Eva Mattes, Wolfgang Reichmann
Cobra Verde (1987)
Adventure | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

During the 1800s, paroled Brazilian bandit Cobra Verde is sent to West Africa with a few troops to man an old Portuguese fort and to convince the local African ruler to resume the slave trade with Brazil.

Director: Werner Herzog
Stars: Klaus Kinski, King Ampaw, José Lewgoy
Stroszek (1977)
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

In Berlin, an alcoholic man, recently released from prison, joins his elderly friend and a prostitute in a determined dream to leave Germany and seek a better life in Wisconsin.

Director: Werner Herzog
Stars: Bruno S., Eva Mattes, Clemens Scheitz
Biography | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

Herzog's film is based upon the true and mysterious story of Kaspar Hauser, a young man who suddenly appeared in Nuremberg in 1828, barely able to talk or walk, and bearing a strange note.

Director: Werner Herzog
Stars: Bruno S., Walter Ladengast, Brigitte Mira
My Best Fiend (1999)
Documentary | Biography
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

In the 1950s, an adolescent Werner Herzog was transfixed by a film performance of the young Klaus Kinski. Years later, they would share an apartment where, in an unabated, forty-eight-hour ... See full summary »

Director: Werner Herzog
Stars: Werner Herzog, Klaus Kinski, Claudia Cardinale
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

The foreman of a small village glassworks dies without revealing the secret to the famous "Ruby Glass".

Director: Werner Herzog
Stars: Josef Bierbichler, Stefan Güttler, Clemens Scheitz
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Klaus Kinski ... Count Dracula
Isabelle Adjani ... Lucy Harker
Bruno Ganz ... Jonathan Harker
Roland Topor ... Renfield
Walter Ladengast Walter Ladengast ... Dr. Van Helsing
Dan van Husen ... Warden
Jan Groth ... Harbormaster
Carsten Bodinus Carsten Bodinus ... Schrader
Martje Grohmann Martje Grohmann ... Mina
Rijk de Gooyer Rijk de Gooyer ... Town official (as Ryk de Gooyer)
Clemens Scheitz Clemens Scheitz ... Clerk
Lo van Hensbergen Lo van Hensbergen ... Harbormaster's Assistent
John Leddy John Leddy ... Coachman
Margiet van Hartingsveld Margiet van Hartingsveld ... Vrouw
Tim Beekman Tim Beekman ... Coffinbearer
Edit

Storyline

Jonathan Harker is sent away to Count Dracula's castle to sell him a house in Wismar where Jonathan lives. But Count Dracula is a vampire, an undead ghoul living off of men's blood. Inspired by a photograph of Lucy Harker, Jonathan's wife, Dracula moves to Wismar, bringing with him death and plague... An unusually contemplative version of Dracula, in which the vampire bears the curse of not being able to get old and die. Written by Yepok

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Horror

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

West Germany | France

Language:

German | English | Romany

Release Date:

17 January 1979 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Nosferatu the Vampyre See more »

Filming Locations:

Tatra Mountains, Slovakia See more »

Edit

Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$5,190,818
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (theatrical)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

One of five Dracula movies made and released around 1979. The films are Dracula (1979), Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979), Love at First Bite (1979), Nocturna (1979) and Dracula Blows His Cool (1979). Also from 1979 were the vampire movies Thirst (1979) and Salem's Lot (1979). See more »

Goofs

Though everyone on the ship dies during its voyage with Dracula aboard, including its captain, it still manages to miraculously reach its intended destination, the very town in which Lucy and Jonathan live. Even assuming Dracula was a competent navigator, the ship would be left to wander aimlessly through the daylight hours, rendering it completely unfeasible that it could arrive before Jonathan. See more »

Quotes

Count Dracula: Death is not the worst. There are things more horrible than death.
See more »

Alternate Versions

The full 107 minute English version of Nosferatu has been released on DVD in the US and the UK by Anchor Bay. See more »

Connections

Followed by Vampire in Venice (1988) See more »

Soundtracks

Sanctus
by Charles Gounod
Performed by Vokal-Ensemble Gordela (uncredited)
Conducted by Jean-Claude Hartemann (uncredited)
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

 
The Most Complete of Vampire Films
11 February 2001 | by kilgres_bloodmoonSee all my reviews

The vampire genre has seen its share of lackluster films. Indeed, the centerpiece of the grand tradition, the Dracula legend, has seen so many remakes and revisionist attempts that one would be hard pressed to find a version of the tale that is original in its telling. Dracula, like it or not, is a cornerstone of Western society. And it is wholly unfortunate that Bela Lugosi is considered THE Dracula (although Hammer fans may contend that Christopher Lee holds the title since he played the good Count over twenty times).

With Werner Herzog's "Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht" (also known as "Nosferatu: The Vampyre"), the old Hollywood rules seem to have been thrown out the window in favor of F.W. Murnau's striking silent film, the 1922 masterpiece "Nosferatu: Eine Symphonie der Grauens" ("Nosferatu: A Symphony of Terror"). While many purists of the genre balk at the idea of favoring the Nosferatu tale over the time-tested Tod Browning and Terence Fisher entries, one must realize that the cape-clad widow's peak Count has been sullied by a thousand parodies over time, and is simply not a frightening entity any longer. This was a matter much pondered by Francis Ford Coppola when considering his adaptation. While Gary Oldman's portrayal was serviceable and definitely different, something key was lacking from the tale.

This is what Herzog and his long-time "trouble and strife" lead man Klaus Kinski found when they ventured upon the "Nosferatu" remake. Herzog shifted the attention of the viewer away from the plot, which acts mostly as a backdrop for the imagery, and made it so the primary intake becomes a visual one. Kinski's Dracula is not the scowling insect of the Murnau film. He portrays the Count in a way that no other actor has quite grasped. In this film, Dracula is a suffering being, loathing every moment of his curse's continuation. Of course, as the good Count himself states, "Young men. You are like the villagers. and cannot place yourself in the soul of the hunter." The vampyre is trapped by his instincts, and Kinski's eyes betray harrowing madness (as they did in "Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes"), spiteful malice, and a sorrow so bottomless it defies description. It is as if the beast wishes to weep, but has forgotten how.

Filming on location in Germany, Herzog uses the same dreamlike camera angles, mixing them with a rich color palette and masterful lighting. There is a certain uneasiness that filters outward from the screen as you watch. As Jonathan Harker explores his surroundings during his lodging at Castle Dracula, there is inexplicably a young gypsy boy incessantly playing a scratchy violin under the archway. The surreality of the picture is only matched by its attention to the dark magic of the vampire. Like its predecessor, it actually seems to believe in the creatures, and respects them. It holds the legend, the plight of the people of Wismar, and the plight of the Count himself in deep reverence.

What can be extracted from the dialogue and plot is that this is not your average bloodsuckers extravaganza. In fact, the good Count only sets his fangs to the throat of the living once on screen, and when that occurs, it lends more of a feeling of sacrifice and sorrow than of terror. Indeed, the tone of the film is driven toward tragedy, and does not shift its course. One of the film's more telling moments is when Dracula, alone with Harker's beloved Lucy, ventures to plead with the beautiful lady, "Will you come to me. become my ally? Bring salvation to your husband. and to me. The absence of love. is the most abject pain." When she refuses, he does not lash out or decide to make a meal of her then and there. He instead moans with the intonation of a wounded animal and slinks off into the night.

"Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht" is the most complete of vampire films, and towers over the genre. It could be considered a pity that the only film that sits upon its coattails is its predecessor of the same name. Under Herzog's direction (wisely choosing to avoid remaking classic shots), we get an entirely different film that exudes an entirely different feeling. It not only maintains the eerie horror that the genre deserves, but also achieves a beauty and mystique that has been lost over the years. A must-see.


134 of 148 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 181 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Popular Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed