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Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)

Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht (original title)
Trailer
2:14 | Trailer
Count Dracula moves from Transylvania to Wismar, spreading the Black Plague across the land. Only a woman pure of heart can bring an end to his reign of horror.

Director:

Werner Herzog

Writer:

Werner Herzog
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Popularity
2,916 ( 611)
5 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Klaus Kinski ... Count Dracula
Isabelle Adjani ... Lucy Harker
Bruno Ganz ... Jonathan Harker
Roland Topor ... Renfield
Walter Ladengast Walter Ladengast ... Dr. Van Helsing
Dan van Husen ... Warden
Jan Groth ... Harbormaster
Carsten Bodinus Carsten Bodinus ... Schrader
Martje Grohmann Martje Grohmann ... Mina
Rijk de Gooyer ... Town official (as Ryk de Gooyer)
Clemens Scheitz Clemens Scheitz ... Clerk
Lo van Hensbergen Lo van Hensbergen ... Harbormaster's Assistent
John Leddy John Leddy ... Coachman
Margiet van Hartingsveld Margiet van Hartingsveld ... Vrouw
Tim Beekman Tim Beekman ... Coffinbearer
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Storyline

Jonathan Harker is sent away to Count Dracula's castle to sell him a house in Wismar where Jonathan lives. But Count Dracula is a vampire, an undead ghoul living off of men's blood. Inspired by a photograph of Lucy Harker, Jonathan's wife, Dracula moves to Wismar, bringing with him death and plague... An unusually contemplative version of Dracula, in which the vampire bears the curse of not being able to get old and die. Written by Yepok

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Horror

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Klaus Kinski (Count Dracula) previously played Renfield in Count Dracula (1970). See more »

Goofs

When Dracula breaks in on Lucy Harker at night and talks to her, you can see the tips of his fingers being reflected in the mirror, as well as his face in the top right-hand corner, until Lucy moves in front of it. Later on, Lucy reads that vampires do not have a reflection. See more »

Quotes

Count Dracula: The absence of love is the most abject pain.
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Alternate Versions

The English-language version was only available in a shorter cut until 2000, which was about 10 minutes shorter. See more »

Connections

Version of Vampyre (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Listen He Who Ventures
(uncredited)
(Featured in German and American film versions)
Written by Florian Fricke
Performed by Popol Vuh
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User Reviews

 
Bloodsucking of the breathtakingly grand.
16 October 2007 | by lost-in-limboSee all my reviews

What artistic brilliance upon Werner Herzog's behalf, but Klaus Kiniski and Isabelle Adjani stamp their lasting marks as well. Never have I been so caught up, amazed and blown away from such profound positioning, poetically creative imagery and mesmerizing performances. I found it incredibly hard to take my eyes off the screen, even though the story has been done to death. Each vividly lush and fairy-tale engraved set piece is set-up, and I hungrily waited to analyse and soak-up this magnificent art form of symbolic and superstitious embellishment. Atmospheric, old fashion chills of the subtle, but still blood-curdling kind fill Herzog's stunningly protracted direction. The story is there, but it's the little details that sets this canvas in motion. The gloomy tone of the film is powerfully brooding from the air of growing despair, loneliness to the smothering stench of dark, lingering death. Kiniski sensationally emit's a sullen, heart-felt turn where he's shadowy exterior creeps up upon you and causes goose bumps. His make-up and body movement is simply trance-like, and stares you down. He's a scavenger, which goes after what he wants and not under any sort seductive appeal. A soulful Adjani is awe-inspiring, and gracefully evokes a versatile performance that also demands your attention. A quite dry Bruno Gaz does well, and an unforgettable Roland Topor as Dracula's loyal servant totally cackles like an on edge hyena. Picturesque cinematography with unique camera-shots, and a forlornly dreamy orchestral music score set the tone. I pretty much agree with others when they say it's a hard one to put into clear and concise words. Just see it.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

West Germany | France

Language:

German | English | Romany

Release Date:

17 January 1979 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Nosferatu the Vampyre See more »

Filming Locations:

Tatra Mountains, Slovakia See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,874
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (theatrical)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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