5.2/10
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52 user 16 critic

More American Graffiti (1979)

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College graduates deal with Vietnam and other issues of the late 1960s.

Director:

Bill Norton (as B.W.L. Norton)

Writers:

Bill Norton (as B.W.L. Norton), George Lucas (based on characters created by) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Candy Clark ... Debbie Dunham
Bo Hopkins ... Little Joe
Ron Howard ... Steve Bolander
Paul Le Mat ... John Milner
Mackenzie Phillips ... Carol / Rainbow
Charles Martin Smith ... Terry the Toad
Cindy Williams ... Laurie Bolander
Anna Bjorn ... Eva
Richard Bradford ... Major Creech
John Brent John Brent ... Ralph
Country Joe McDonald Country Joe McDonald ... Country Joe and the Fish
Barry Melton Barry Melton ... Country Joe and the Fish (as Barry 'the Fish' Melton)
Robert Hogins Robert Hogins ... Country Joe and the Fish
Robert Flurie Robert Flurie ... Country Joe and the Fish
Peter Albin Peter Albin ... Country Joe and the Fish
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Storyline

College graduates deal with Vietnam and other issues of the late 1960s.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The sights and sounds of the '60s. There were bittersweet times. There were funny times. And it was all unforgettable. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | War

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Icelandic

Release Date:

3 August 1979 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Purple Haze See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$15,014,674
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

George Lucas came up with the idea of shooting each of the four storylines in a different aspect ratio. Milner's Drag racing was in the 1950's exploitation style using a wide angle, stationary camera. The Vietnam sequences were shot on 16-milimeter film, like the television reports of the time. Laurie and Steve's campus riot resembled a Hollywood version of student rebellions like The Strawberry Statement (1970) or Getting Straight (1970). Debbie's trip were in multiple-image split-screen, inspired by Woodstock (1970). See more »

Goofs

The Vietnam sequence is set in 1965, around the time M16 rifles were introduced. Toad and other American soldiers are armed with later M16A1 rifles (distinguishable by their cylindrical muzzle and 30-round magazines) issued in 1967. While the early M16s were indeed notorious for jamming in Viet Nam's in jungle conditions, the M16A1 was specifically introduced to remedy this problem. See more »

Quotes

Army Sergeant: Now you git to it or I'll be talking to the major. This is his personal, favorite shithouse, you understand?
See more »

Crazy Credits

The Bolander twins in the end credits are listed as Kevin and Teddy, instead of their real names, Mark and Michael. See more »


Soundtracks

You Were on My Mind
Written by Sylvia Tyson
Performed by The We Five
Courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
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User Reviews

 
Their futures were foretold at the conclusion of the original...
31 July 2001 | by moonspinner55See all my reviews

So why did we need "More"? It must've been a corporate decision--with financial gain the bottom line. If so, that plan didn't quite work, as "More American Graffiti" failed to catch on with its target audience, mostly due to the fact it reflects not the 1960s but TV sitcoms derived from '60s nostalgia. The Ron Howard and Cindy Williams segment plays like a "Happy Days" rerun with bad language, however Charles Martin Smith's Vietnam episode is vividly captured--and the idea of him trying to blow off his own arm in order to get back home says more about the war than "The Deer Hunter" did in three hours. Paul LeMat has some good scenes flirting with a pretty Swede, while Candy Clark kicks around as a kooky hippie. The film, produced by George Lucas, is full of colorful distractions: multi-image cinematography, constant period music on the soundtrack and lots of overacting. Unfortunately, nothing can distract from the laziness of the writing, nor from the film's somewhat tiring concept--each story takes place on a different New Year's Eve--which is a gimmick, nothing more. The episodes aren't shaped with much cleverness, and the film is rather insensitive and preconceived. ** from ****


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