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Mort Fallick, Film Editor on 'Love at First Bite' and 'Moonlighting,' Dies at 86

Mort Fallick, Film Editor on 'Love at First Bite' and 'Moonlighting,' Dies at 86
Mort Fallick, a film editor with credits including Love at First Bite and TV's Moonlighting, has died. He was 86.

Fallick died Wednesday of kidney failure at the Motion Picture & Television Fund's Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills, his daughter, Allison Mupas, announced.

In the 1960s, Fallick launched CineMetric, a fully integrated production and postproduction services company, where he created commercial campaigns for Madison Avenue ad agencies and edited documentaries, government/corporate films, TV shows and movie trailers.

Editors including future Oscar nominees Craig McKay (The Silence of the Lambs), Barry Malkin (The Godfather: Part II) and Richard ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

New Dracula Movie Coming from Blumhouse

New Dracula Movie Coming from Blumhouse
“To die, to truly be dead,” Bela Lugosi said in Hollywood’s classic adaptation of Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula, “that must be glorious.” But beloved monsters never die, no matter how many stakes you drive through their hearts. They are rebooted. Following the box office and critical success of The Invisible Man, Jason Blum’s Blumhouse production banner is looking to resurrect Dracula, according to The Hollywood Reporter. While Universal hasn’t officially signed on, they do have a first-look deal with Blumhouse and a cloakroom of capes for the Transylvanian Count.

The new Dracula movie will be helmed by Karyn Kusama. Matt Manfredi and Phil Hay, who teamed with Kusama on those latter two films, will write the screenplay. Kusama also recently directed an episode of HBO’s adaptation of Stephen King’s The Outsider.

Universal has learned some lessons since unwrapping The Mummy, starring Tom Cruise, in
See full article at Den of Geek »

Film Review: Zone Pro Site: The Moveable Feast (2013) by Chen Yu-hsun

Film Review: Zone Pro Site: The Moveable Feast (2013) by Chen Yu-hsun
The New York Asian Film Festival Winter Showcase 2020 is here and, among other pleasantries, it brings a fistful of films that will make you hungry. Very hungry. Under the title of “Love at First Bite”, the festival teases you with magnificent seven films. One of them, Taiwanese “Zone Pro Site: The Moveable Feast”.

“Zone Pro Site: The Movable Feast” is screening at New York Asian Film Festival Winter Showcase 2020

Wan (Kimi Hsia) wants to break through in the world of modeling. Despite the effort, her career is far from getting started. Moreover, on her birthday, a pair of crooks knocks on Wan’s door. They ask nothing less from her than to pay her boyfriend’s debt of one million Nts. Desperate, she packs her luggage and leaves for Taiwan, to join her mother Ai-fong (Lin Mei-hsiu).

What you need to know is, Wen happens to be the daughter of
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Review: Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw

I have never seen a film in the Fast & Furious franchise so approached the latest release, Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw, with fresh eyes. I’ve certainly managed to absorb via pop culture osmosis the gist of the series’ evolution and the saturated play of the trailer all spring, certainly got me curious. So, kudos to the trailer’s editor.

While the premise behind the series does little for me, I enjoy a good buddy film and my understanding is that stars Dwayne Johnson and Jason Stratham had such different approaches to acting that I was curious to see how well they played together.

This is what we used to call a popcorn film: just enough plot to tie the action sequences together, appealing cast, and lots of things going boom. On those terms, the film works wonderfully and it is rather entertaining.

Hattie Shaw (Vanessa Kirby) is
See full article at Comicmix »

Arte Johnson Dies: Emmy-Winning ‘Laugh-In’ Standout Was 90

Arte Johnson Dies: Emmy-Winning ‘Laugh-In’ Standout Was 90
Arte Johnson, who won an Emmy for his memorable work on Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In and worked in TV and film for nearly half a century, died early Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles, his family said announced. He was 90 and had battled bladder and prostate cancer for the past three years.

Johnson earned three consecutive Emmy noms for Laugh-In from 1969-71, winning the first year. He was part of the politically tinged NBC sketch series’ main cast from its launch in January 1968 until 1971, playing myriad characters in the show that launched the careers of such stars as Lily Tomlin, Goldie Hawn, Eileen Brennan, Henry Gibson, Jo Anne Worley and many others.

Among his most popular characters was Wolfgang, a cigarette-smoking German soldier who believed that World War II was still ongoing, as he scouted the show while hidden behind bushes. He would then invariably comment on the preceding sketch
See full article at Deadline »

It Came From The Tube: Vampire (1979)

Boy howdy, people were sure digging vampires by the end of the ‘70s, weren’t they? Back in vogue, 1979 alone brought Frank Langella as a very sensuous Dracula, George Hamilton with a humorous take in Love at First Bite, Werner Herzog’s retelling of Nosferatu, and Tobe Hooper’s bone-chilling Stephen King miniseries adaptation, Salem’s Lot. There was another small screen vamp to appear that year no one talks about however and that’s ABC’s Vampire, a generically branded thriller that works due to some heavy Richard Lynch lifting as the titular doomed creature.

Originally broadcast on October 7th as The ABC Sunday Night Movie, Vampire had to contend with Alice/The Jeffersons and Trapper John, M.D. on CBS, and NBC’s The Big Event, their dumping ground for specials and TV flicks. And while it doesn’t hold a cross to any of the above entries,
See full article at DailyDead »

October Horrors 2018 Day 8 – Dracula (1958)

Dracula (a.k.a. Horror of Dracula), 1958.

Directed by Terence Fisher.

Starring Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Michael Gough, Melissa Stribling, and Carol Marsh.

Synopsis:

After his friend Jonathan Harker goes missing, vampire hunter Dr Van Helsing finds himself locked into a battle against his murderer, the centuries-old vampire known as Count Dracula.

To say that Bram Stoker’s classic novel Dracula has been adapted to the screen a few times would be a very grave understatement, with a with an estimated 217 films featuring the Count among its cast and with hundreds of actors taking on the role often to forgettable effect (although George Hamilton as a disco-era Dracula in Love at First Bite is a fun novelty).

Of course, it is Bela Lugosi’s iconic portrayal in Universal’s 1931 adaptation that still lingers as the definitive version of the bloodsucker and while Lugosi is iconic he’s not the only man to master the Count.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Stan Dragoti, Director of ‘Mr. Mom,’ ‘Love at First Bite,’ Dies at 85

Stan Dragoti, Director of ‘Mr. Mom,’ ‘Love at First Bite,’ Dies at 85
Stan Dragoti, director of “Love at First Bite” and “Mr. Mom,” died July 13 in Los Angeles. His wife Yolanda reported that he died after complications from pneumonia. He was 85.

In addition to rewatching his films such as “Mr. Mom” and “Love at First Bite,” he loved watching his movie “Necessary Roughness,” Yolanda Dragoti said, “Because he loved football.”

“He got me hooked on Turner Classic Movies, we would watch black and white movies all night long,” she recalled. “He was such a history buff, a film buff. I learned so much from him.”

Born in Manhattan, Dragoti was the son of Albanian immigrants.

He attended Cooper Union College and later the Visual Arts College before working at the New York City advertising agencies Young & Rubicam and Mary Wells Lawrence. He partnered with Charlie Moss to create the “I Love New York” tourism campaign.

Dragoti broke into Hollywood by teaming
See full article at Variety »

Stan Dragoti, ‘Mr. Mom’ Director and Co-Creator of ‘I Love New York’ Ad Campaign, Dies at 85

Stan Dragoti, ‘Mr. Mom’ Director and Co-Creator of ‘I Love New York’ Ad Campaign, Dies at 85
Stan Dragoti, the ad man-turned-film director who co-created the “I Love New York” campaign and is best known for his comedy films “Love at First Bite” and “Mr. Mom,” died July 13. He was in an assisted living facility and had been experiencing health issues following open heart surgery in 2014, the Hollywood Reporter reports.

Born in 1932 in New York to Albanian immigrant parents, Dragoti began his career directing commercials, most prominently for pioneering ad agency Wells Rich Greene beginning in 1966. There, he formed a creative partnership with future ad legend Charlie Moss, leading them to co-write the script for Dragoti’s debut feature film, the revisionist Western “Dirty Little Billy” in 1972.

The pair remained close after Dragoti’s departure from Wells Rich Greene in 1972. Five years later, Moss recruited Dragoti to help create the commercials for the “I Love New York” ad campaign, introduced in 1977.

Also Read: Steve Ditko, 'Spider-Man
See full article at The Wrap »

Stan Dragoti, Director of 'Love at First Bite' and 'Mr. Mom,' Dies at 85

Stan Dragoti, Director of 'Love at First Bite' and 'Mr. Mom,' Dies at 85
Stan Dragoti, who directed the popular big-screen comedies Love at First Bite and Mr. Mom and was the first husband of supermodel Cheryl Tiegs, has died. He was 85.

Dragoti died Friday at an assisted living facility in Los Angeles, his wife, Yolanda, told The Hollywood Reporter. He had battled health issues since undergoing open-heart surgery four years ago, she said.

A son of an Albanian immigrant, Dragoti came from the world of New York advertising. He made his Hollywood debut by writing and directing Dirty Little Billy (1972), a Western about the early years of the outlaw Billy the Kid ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Joel Freeman Dies: Producer of ‘Shaft’ And ‘Love At First Bite’ Was 95

Joel Freeman Dies: Producer of ‘Shaft’ And ‘Love At First Bite’ Was 95
Joel Freeman, a veteran producer behind such films as Shaft, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter and Love at First Bite, has died. He was 95 and passed away Sunday night after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease and lung cancer at his Sherman Oaks, CA home. His death was confirmed by his wife, Betty, who called him “a wonderful man and entertainer.” Freeman had more than 100 films, series and movies for television on his long resume. Some of his films included The Tender Trap
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Joel Freeman Dies: Producer of ‘Shaft’ And ‘Love At First Bite’ Was 95

Joel Freeman, a veteran producer behind such films as Shaft, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter and Love at First Bite, has died. He was 95 and passed away Sunday night after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease and lung cancer at his Sherman Oaks, CA home. His death was confirmed by his wife, Betty, who called him “a wonderful man and entertainer.” Freeman had more than 100 films, series and movies for television on his long resume. Some of his films included The Tender Trap
See full article at Deadline TV »

Love at First Bite: Fyi Series Follows Couples Who Open Restaurants

Love at First Bite is a new restaurant series coming soon! The series will follow couples that open restaurants together. revealed more about this new series in a press release. Check that out below.“Panna, the award-winning digital cooking brand and home cooking app, has partnered with Fyi on the new seven-episode series, Love at First Bite. Each 30-minute episode follows a couple who met, fell in love, and followed their passion for food and creativity together by opening a restaurant."Love at First Bite" features accomplished chefs and their partners as they cook meaningful dishes in their home kitchen, showcasing their relationship while also providing educational cooking tips. An array of successful culinary stars including Vivian Howard, Nina Compton, Gavin Kaysen, Adam Sappington, John Shields, Elise Kornack, and Sohui Kim are featured over the course of the season.
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

It Came From The Tube: The Dead Don’T Die (1975)

Director Curtis Harrington always offered up solid, unassuming genre fare on the small screen (How Awful about Allan, the wonderfully goofy Devil Dog: The Hound of Hell); and when he collaborated with noted scribe Robert Bloch (Psycho), the result was NBC’s The Dead Don’t Die (1975), an effective throwback to the Lewton/Turneur era beloved by both, shot through with a big dose of pulpy goodness.

Originally broadcast on January 14th as an NBC World Premiere Movie, Tddd didn’t stand a chance against the likes of the ABC Tuesday Movie of the Week or the ironclad CBS lineup of M*A*S*H/Hawaii Five-o, and Bloch is on the record as not being a fan. Oh well; I still dig its entertaining mashup of neo noir and old fashioned zombies even if he doesn’t. And you might too if that particular elixir peaks your interest.

Crack
See full article at DailyDead »

It Came From The Tube: The Strange Possession Of Mrs. Oliver (1977)

TV horror lives and dies by the pen. From the ‘50s to the ‘90s, network TV shows and movies simply couldn’t carry the weight of special effects, and the content restrictions placed on TV (before the advent of cable, I’m talking the Big Three – ABC, CBS, NBC) back in the day did not allow for the most part a visceral experience. (Oh how times have changed.) So often the tale itself would have to suffice, and if it was gripping enough, blood speckled walls and torn limbs weren’t even necessary. Case in point: The Strange Possession of Mrs. Oliver (1977), an NBC Monday Night at the Movies written by none other than Richard Matheson, starring Karen Black.

Premiering Monday, February 28th, 1977, Strange’s beat down would come at the hands of ABC’s Monday Night Movie (I just love the creative monikers), which regularly trounced any and all comers in that time slot.
See full article at DailyDead »

Therapy For A Vampire – Review

Summer just officially started just a few days ago, so Halloween is months away. Perhaps a great way to get us cooled off, to put us in a Fall state of mind, would be to pay a visit to one of the oldest horror movie icons: the vampire. Everyone’s aware of how scary those fanged fiends can be, but you may have forgotten how funny they are (intentionally, of course). Movie audiences have emitted nervous laughter ever since Max Schreck emerged from the shadows in the silent classic Nosferatu. And certainly there are bits (and bites) of humor (mostly comic relief supporting players) in 1931’s Dracula and Mark Of The Vampire, both with Bela Lugosi. It wasn’t until 1948 that he was in an all out farce (though the Count is never lampooned) in Abbott And Costello Meet Frankenstein. After Hammer Studios brought back (in full gory color) the bloodsuckers ten years later,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sliff 2015 Review – Silver Skies

Silver Skies screens Sunday November 8th at 6:45pm at The Tivoli Theater as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The film’s director, Rosemary Rodriguez, will be in attendance and will receive Sliff’s ‘Women in Film’ Award.Ticket information for the event can be found Here

Review by Dana Jung.

Today, more than ever, with our shortened attention spans, inundation by multi-media delivery systems, and almost obsessive need for instant information, it is easy to forget the wonderful actors of the 1960s, 70s, and 80s who inspired and influenced us. So many great moments created by sometimes iconic performers live on in the movies and television of certain eras. From Mr. Spock to Archie Bunker, Annie Hall to James Bond, or Mrs. Peel to Lieutenant Columbo, these and other memorable characters fueled everything from fashion choices to sexual fantasies. That’s why the new
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

American Horror Story: Hotel Premiere Recap: Did You Enjoy Your Stay?

American Horror Story: Hotel Premiere Recap: Did You Enjoy Your Stay?
In its premiere, American Horror Story: Hotel went for the jugular, serving up everything from a blood-soaked foursome to an eyeless monster with a drill-bit dildo. But did it deliver shock and awe or shock and “eh”? Read on, then we’ll discuss.

RelatedAhs: Hotel Scoop: Lady Gaga Will Romance Angela Bassett

Tourist Trap | As “Checking In” began, two comely Swedish girls — unimpressed by the retro-fabulousness of the Hotel Cortez — were trying to get their money back from bespectacled front desk clerk Iris (Kathy Bates) so that they could stay somewhere else. But, informed that a refund was
See full article at TVLine.com »

Sandler to Have Biggest Opening Weekend of His Career with 'Hotel Transylvania 2'? Think Again.

'Hotel Transylvania 2.' 'Hotel Transylvania 2' far surpasses expectations at domestic box office: Adam Sandler a hit when heard but not seen Adam Sandler has been having his share of domestic box office flops lately. Chris Columbus' Pixels, which opened in late July to scathing reviews and indifferent audiences, was the latest one: a reported $88 million production (plus marketing and distribution expenses) that earned $76.67 million in the U.S. and Canada (plus an estimated $145.1 million elsewhere). But now comes the Sony Pictures release Hotel Transylvania 2, the concisely titled sequel to the late Sept. 2012 hit Hotel Transylvania. Directed by Genndy Tartakovsky, the $80-85 million-budgeted animated feature should open around $48 million from 3,754 theaters according to early weekend box office estimates found at Deadline.com. The report adds that some “rival studio box office analysts” believe Hotel Transylvania 2 may actually pass the $50 million mark. On Friday, Sept. 25, '15, it collected a better than expected (estimated) $13.5 million.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Richard Benjamin To Attend "The Sunshine Boys" 40th Anniversary Screening In L.A., August 4

Herbert Ross’s 1975 film The Sunshine Boys, which stars Walter Matthau, George Burns, and Richard Benjamin, celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. The Royale Laemmle Theater in Los Angeles will be holding a special one-night-only showing of the 111-minute film on Tuesday, August 4th, 2015 at 7:00 pm. Actor Richard Benjamin is scheduled to appear at the screening and is due to partake in a Q & A and discussion on the making of the film.

From the press release:

Fortieth anniversary screening of The Sunshine Boys (1975), Tuesday, August 4 at 7 Pm at the Royal.

Walter Matthau, George Burns, and Richard Benjamin star in the film version of Neil Simon's hit Broadway comedy about a pair of feuding vaudeville stars who are pressured to reunite for a TV special. The film was nominated for four Academy Awards, and Burns won the Oscar for his first significant film role since Honolulu in 1939. The
See full article at CinemaRetro »
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